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I would LOVE to become a pro at skiing, even some competition, I want to become a ski instructor too!

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Ok, so I'm a beginner, maybe a level 5 or 6 skier. I have been skiing three times in the past ten years..(I know right?!) I feel like I have picked up the sport rather well, I feel confident while skiing even when I haven't been on the lopes in many years. I honestly feel like I was born in the wrong part of the country (ALABAMA).  Since my last trip to Taos N.M I have been obesesd with skiing, I want to learn everything there is to know about it. I want to become a Pro essentially, I would especially love sharing what I learn with other novice and beginner skiers. I want to know how to achive my new profound dream! I can not stop thinking about it. I am currently trying different "dry land" training to get my body ready for the challenge this December. If you guys have any tips, advice or anything please let me know. Thanks, and I can't wait to see what the future holds for me!

post #2 of 14

ski 100 days every year.

post #3 of 14

Welcome to Epic...If you are a good communicator and have experience coaching, teaching, working with kids, etc it is not that hard to get a job at a ski school...you might start out with the younger never-evers and the pay will stink, but if you pick the right resort, you will have access to good trainers who will teach you to become a better skier and teacher.

 

http://www.jobmonkey.com/ski/html/hired_as_an_instructor.html

 

If you can't catch on right away as an instructor, resorts are hiring new lifties, etc each season.  

post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ambitiousskier View Post
 

Ok, so I'm a beginner, maybe a level 5 or 6 skier. I have been skiing three times in the past ten years..(I know right?!) I feel like I have picked up the sport rather well, I feel confident while skiing even when I haven't been on the lopes in many years. I honestly feel like I was born in the wrong part of the country (ALABAMA).  Since my last trip to Taos N.M I have been obesesd with skiing, I want to learn everything there is to know about it. I want to become a Pro essentially, I would especially love sharing what I learn with other novice and beginner skiers. I want to know how to achive my new profound dream! I can not stop thinking about it. I am currently trying different "dry land" training to get my body ready for the challenge this December. If you guys have any tips, advice or anything please let me know. Thanks, and I can't wait to see what the future holds for me!

 

Are you currently living in ALABAMA?  It's going to be difficult until you move.

You can plan one trip every season, and make it a week long trip.  

There's still time this season for that week long trip.

Take lessons so you won't embed bad habits.

Then when you can move away, pick your location based on the skiing and GO....

I get your issue; I was born in MISSISSIPPI.

You don't have to ski 100 days per season to become a ski instructor.

Welcome to Epic.

post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ambitiousskier View Post
 

Ok, so I'm a beginner, maybe a level 5 or 6 skier. I have been skiing three times in the past ten years..(I know right?!) I feel like I have picked up the sport rather well, I feel confident while skiing even when I haven't been on the lopes in many years. I honestly feel like I was born in the wrong part of the country (ALABAMA).  Since my last trip to Taos N.M I have been obesesd with skiing, I want to learn everything there is to know about it. I want to become a Pro essentially, I would especially love sharing what I learn with other novice and beginner skiers. I want to know how to achive my new profound dream! I can not stop thinking about it. I am currently trying different "dry land" training to get my body ready for the challenge this December. If you guys have any tips, advice or anything please let me know. Thanks, and I can't wait to see what the future holds for me!

Welcome to EpicSki!  You are in the right place to learn more about skiing and what it takes to be an instructor, even though you can't get to any slopes very often.  I know folks who drive from Alabama to ski in the small hills in North Carolina because they don't want to wait until a trip out west is possible.  I drive 4 hours from central NC to ski in northern VA as often as possible.  That way I can make the most of time spent out west.

 

Have you looked around the Fitness section for threads about ski conditioning?  Working on balance and core strength can make a big difference.  Pilates, yoga, tai chi are all good preparation.  It's not just about what your legs are ready to do.

 

Even though I'm guessing you probably aren't a boomer, I like this series for general ski fitness preparation.

http://www.bumpsforboomers.com/basic-ski-fitness-free-online-video-skiing-exercises

post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 

thank you so much for the input!! My family and I currently have a timeshare we use when we go on extended trips. But I'm trying to get rid of the darn thing. It has actually come in handy for our most recent trip. I'm learning that I need to commit two to three weeks each season. which the TS would help a little as far as housing.  My husband is active duty military (Army Guard Reserves) he is currently looking for positions out west. Of course I want to be ready once we get the chance to make the big move! I'm currently conditioning myself with video workouts of yoga, P90x, and a few other core strengthening . I'll check out the "boomers" training. thanks ya'll!!

post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ambitiousskier View Post
 

thank you so much for the input!! My family and I currently have a timeshare we use when we go on extended trips. But I'm trying to get rid of the darn thing. It has actually come in handy for our most recent trip. I'm learning that I need to commit two to three weeks each season. which the TS would help a little as far as housing.  My husband is active duty military (Army Guard Reserves) he is currently looking for positions out west. Of course I want to be ready once we get the chance to make the big move! I'm currently conditioning myself with video workouts of yoga, P90x, and a few other core strengthening . I'll check out the "boomers" training. thanks ya'll!!

I am also a timeshare owner.  If you are willing to make the drive, can get pretty good units in Boone for skiing at Sugar or Beech in the NC mountains.  I stay on resort at Massanutten all the time.  Relatively easy to get a unit during the winter.

 

Another good place for a woman to ask questions about all sorts of ski related topics is TheSkiDiva.com .  Plenty who live hours away from a ski mountain.

 

Paging @contesstant 

post #8 of 14

Just had to chime in here, as my experience coming up early in life was a lot like what your describing, although I washed out of racing in college from a knee injury.

 

First off, you should try to refine what you mean for professional / competition / instructor.

 

The post above about instructing little kids is right.  At the many ski schools, they used to rely on volunteers to teach the little kids (we called it Ski Wee but there are lots of names for these classes where it's about 50-50 ski / daycare program), and in exchange you got a pass for the rest of the day, and it went in 1/2 day cycles, so you could spend the AM towing the kids up and down the carpets, and then get a good afternoon in skiing.  Do that with a friend who will push you to ski as fast as you can during your free ski time.

 

I never progressed to professional instructor, mainly because there are a bunch of hoops to jump through if you want to get hired as a paid instructor, i.e., get "certified", and IMHO it's more about lining the pockets of the ski school than improving how you ski... A lot of what you have to do to be certified is based on taking lessons yourself, or at least it used to be.  I can count on one hand the things lessons I really got anything out of.  That's not always true, so judge the value of going through certification for yourself... lots of lesson time may make you a better skier, or it may get you stuck in a rut.  The main factor is going to be where you ski most of the time.  If it's some rinky dink place in NC, I wouldn't be very optimistic.  It was my racing coaches who really got my skiing to an *expert* level. And I got good enough to race from lots of all out runs with my buddies after spending the mornings with 5 y.o.'s on the bunny hill.  If you want to know about how the "professional ski instrustors of america" came about, have a read here: http://www.epicski.com/t/72187/a-little-history-of-the-ski-instructors-certification-in-the-us.  Things seem to have improved, but when I was coming up in the 80's, it was run more like a guilde than a bona fide standards body.  It's a very different sport now, and the economics have changed a lot, so who knows, you may enjoy it.

 

Also joining a ski club that has a race league is a great way to improve.  Many leagues require there to be a certain ratio of men to women, and, although more women are racing now, it used to be many clubs would be happy just to have get a female body on their roster, no matter what times you could throw down, and then you could learn a lot from the faster racers.  That's how my mother progressed from a relatively weaker intermediate skier to what I'd call "aggressive advanced" but not quite "expert" level.

 

Now, as far as general advice, if you go the racing route, be prepared for the injuries.  They WILL happen when you start skiing at the most aggressive level where you are more concerned about popping out of your skis in a hard turn than you are about falling.  You didn't mention how old you are, or how well insured you are, but the vast majority of USSA racers through college will at some point be very happy to be insured by their parents.  Bindings my have improved over the years, but the new pair I just bought lst week came with fine print that says, basically, this binding will only protect your lower leg NOT your knee.  Lawyers.  I just shook my head.  But the point is that there is  HUGE difference in the amount of risk you assume racing recreationally (e.g., NASTAR or beer league) and as a "pro" (i.e., USSA). 

 

Anyway, that's my 2c.  Good luck!

post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thank for the input! I suppose I'm a little all over the place with my question.. I have to thank my ADD for that! LOL.  I have  been doing a lot of reading on the topic and a lot of what I call "dry land" conditioning. I am 32 years old. I would like to think that I am well insured (military) but that can always change, so I suppose and secondary insurance probably wouldn't be a bad idea.  For the moment I really need to better my skiing capabilities. My form. speed, and confidence. I figured traveling twice a year to the western slopes for two weeks at a time will help get me there until we make the "BIG MOVE"!  We currently live in Alabama, and waiting on positions for my husbands work to open up in other states. I really don't like the slopes on the north eastern side, they seem shallow compared to places like Taos, Angel Fire N.M, and Durango CO. The overall terrain is better and the snow conditions feel better too! 

 

As far as competition, I only know of NAVSTAR races, I'm guessing that's a good place to start? I assume becoming a great racer equals becoming a expert, however I maybe totally wrong, I have no Idea!   I read last night that I should join a team or a league, I need to find out how to do that! I still have much to learn for competition skiing, or skiing in general rather. I'm a beginner, but feel like I can take the blues with ease, I can do turns pretty well, except when I get tired I make many, many form mistakes. I have a lot of bad habits. Which is most likely because Ive never had any "lessons"!  Should I find a coach or just pay for someone who teaches through the resort and pay out the ass for meager lessons? How do I find a coach?

 

I know I'm all over the place again, and my grammar sucks too! Now, back to skiing, I figured I would become a instructor during my down time. Maybe teach the little youngsters...and some adults, too, and perhaps help pay for my new addiction! I realize the pay can be crap, but I'm not looking to fill my nest egg for retirement. I have read that Taos has instructor clinics IMHO, it seems pricey, you only get three days and have to pay for lift tickets at a greatly reduced rate. According to the website, if your hired from the school, you get your entry fee back...but three days? Is that really long enough? I'm great with people I never meet a stranger, I'm energetic and ready to learn new things! I'm just not sure how three days in a instructor camp makes good instructors! I think you have to already know a lot about the slopes and proper form to be a great instructor. As far as being good with kids.. I think I can handle that!  I'm raising three right now and they seem to be surviving me! LOL No, really they love me, or at least I think they do! On second thought they could be planning to throw me into geriatric jail (nursing home) as soon as they can!

 

Again thanks for your input, I can use it! If I still haven't clarified my questions let me know! Like I said I still have much to learn on the sport oh, yeah! I want to do giant slalom racing!! That's the one I really like.. anyway. Any info you think I can use please pass it along.. Thanks for reading my incomplete sentences and trying to follow my random writing. You guys are great!

post #10 of 14

I you are talking two separate 2 week trips out West (4 weeks total) , then I would consider an Epic local season pass (under $600) along with the Keystone or Breck unlimited Adult Group lesson pass (about $300- call them to find out when it is on sale).  There might be other lesson options, but you should get quality instruction at a good price at either place.

 

A Masters Race program might be another way to go- some offer punch passes or drop in days.  This would offer more of a challenge than Nastar and provide some coaching.

post #11 of 14
One question about your husbands active duty service, you said above that: "My husband is active duty military (Army Guard Reserves) he is currently looking for positions out west." You just mentioned all the possibly service categories and I'm just confused about which one because it matters about his (and your) medical insurance status and possible job locations, thus possible ski locations. A soldier can either be active duty, in the Army Reserve (part timers who work for the federal government) or in the Army National Guard (part timers who work for a state government). Each of these categories have their own specific bases or forts for your husbands job. Here's where it gets more complicated, your husband can be put on active duty orders from either the reserves or guard and might be serving in an active duty position even though he's in the guard or reserves. Depending on which status he is I can tell you where his possible locations are for moving and then the fine people of epicski can give you the pros and cons of the locations from a skiing perspective.
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Ewok, I was wrong, my Hubbs, is Active Guard Reserves. Or AGR, he enlisted in the Alabama national guard after being active duty Army for 6 years, but is currently AGR for the past 12 years. So he's only been looking for E7-E8 slots nation wide. He has several MOS qualifications 92Y, 74D and various others. Only problem is AGR slots especially E7 are very hard to come by. He tried to re-enlist ACTIVE DUTY Army but with the cut backs they aren't taking any prior service. He only has 7 years left before he's eligible to retire. Our fingers are crossed for openings in some ideal locations! I hope that answered your question, I try to understand the military garb but I get lost pretty quickly. I think I understand that once he retires we have the option to keep tricare standard. Which means co-pays and limited PCM choices. I probably gave too much info. But oh well!
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ambitiousskier View Post

Our fingers are crossed for openings in some ideal locations!

This phrase may have a lot to do with your success in moving to ski country.  Make sure you are aware of all of the great ski locations in the West.  There are many that fly under the radar but may be perfect for you.  Start with the Resorts and the Unofficial Guides linked at the top of every page here.  Have fun.

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ambitiousskier View Post

Ewok, I was wrong, my Hubbs, is Active Guard Reserves. Or AGR, he enlisted in the Alabama national guard after being active duty Army for 6 years, but is currently AGR for the past 12 years. So he's only been looking for E7-E8 slots nation wide. He has several MOS qualifications 92Y, 74D and various others. Only problem is AGR slots especially E7 are very hard to come by. He tried to re-enlist ACTIVE DUTY Army but with the cut backs they aren't taking any prior service. He only has 7 years left before he's eligible to retire. Our fingers are crossed for openings in some ideal locations! I hope that answered your question, I try to understand the military garb but I get lost pretty quickly. I think I understand that once he retires we have the option to keep tricare standard. Which means co-pays and limited PCM choices. I probably gave too much info. But oh well!

Got it. If he has been in so long then he knows where to look for openings. Is he interested in taking a traditional (part time) guard or reserve job to get his foot in the door with a unit so that can apply for an AGR job within?

I think a good place to look would be Fort Lewis, it's just outside Seattle and a relatively short drive to many great skiing locations in the PNW.
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