or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › What sort of brush should I use?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What sort of brush should I use?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Hi guys, 

 

I recently started waxing my own ski's and in the shop they gave me three sorts of brushes.

 

For the moment I have a steel brush, a copper base brush and a horsehair brush.

The problem is that I don't really know which brush I should use before and after waxing. I would say the copper brush before waxing to open the base structure, after waxing first the steel brush and the horsehair brush to finish. Any other opinions? 

 

And what sort of brush would you use between different layers of wax or for example after a 'hot scrape' (as English isn't my first language I don't know if this is a common used term, but I think you understand what i mean :)) to clean the base?

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Gregory

post #2 of 21

Here is a good place to start.

If I only had one brush this would be it.

Shop around...

https://www.reliableracing.com/detail.cfm?edp=10920627

post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
Ok, well thanks a lot but I already have a steel, copper and horsehair brush and I don't know what brush I should use when smile.gif
post #4 of 21

Opinions may vary.

It is really cold here and I am using hard waxes.

Hot scraping hard wax is mandatory.

I use a brass rotobrush for a first pass because I can't bear to put steel on sharp edges.

Then I brush like hell with the brush above.

Then a good stiff horsehair is enough for all but racing.

If  it's racing then use a short nylon brush before you try something fancy with an overlay.

Hi fluro overlays require a dedicated set of brushes.

post #5 of 21
Does the steel brush feel soft? If it's stiff you should wait to find out how to use it. Steel can scratch your edges, so be sure you're using it as prescribed. Steel brushes have specific uses, and you'll have to see who pipes up to say what it's used for.

Your "copper" brush is either bronze or brass, probably bronze. It's used to clean out the bases before waxing and as a first brush after scraping. After it removes most of the wax you'd use the horsehair to remove the rest and polish. I'd suggest picking up a white nylon brush to use between bronze and horsehair because it's more aggressive than horsehair. Unless, of course, others with more experience say to use the steel instead.

As for me, I have the Swix bronze/blue nylon brush, and it's really nice (my understanding is that the nylon is there to reduce static electricity; some bronze brushes come without it). I use it before waxing to clean any debris or wax out of the bases and open the structure, and it's my first brush after scraping. After that I use white (hard) nylon and then horsehair. Brass or bronze, white nylon, and horsehair are what's in most brush kits, so that's what I went with. I get great results.
post #6 of 21
Sorry, I forgot hot scraping. For a new or freshly ground ski I don't even scrape between the first few layers, just reheat the wax. I go through my brush sequence between the next layers to get rid of any grime or residue the wax picked up, and I do the same when I'm putting on my final layers.
post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregorysuy View Post
 

Hi guys, 

 

I recently started waxing my own ski's and in the shop they gave me three sorts of brushes.

 

For the moment I have a steel brush, a copper base brush and a horsehair brush.

The problem is that I don't really know which brush I should use before and after waxing. I would say the copper brush before waxing to open the base structure, after waxing first the steel brush and the horsehair brush to finish. Any other opinions? 

 

And what sort of brush would you use between different layers of wax or for example after a 'hot scrape' (as English isn't my first language I don't know if this is a common used term, but I think you understand what i mean :)) to clean the base?

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Gregory


Gregory, before any waxing use your steel, then go ahead and use the copper too.  After scraping wax use all three.  Steel, Copper, Horsehair last.  The Horsehair can be used in both directions as polishing a shoe. 

post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post

Does the steel brush feel soft? If it's stiff you should wait to find out how to use it. Steel can scratch your edges, so be sure you're using it as prescribed. Steel brushes have specific uses, and you'll have to see who pipes up to say what it's used for.

Your "copper" brush is either bronze or brass, probably bronze. It's used to clean out the bases before waxing and as a first brush after scraping. After it removes most of the wax you'd use the horsehair to remove the rest and polish. I'd suggest picking up a white nylon brush to use between bronze and horsehair because it's more aggressive than horsehair. Unless, of course, others with more experience say to use the steel instead.

As for me, I have the Swix bronze/blue nylon brush, and it's really nice (my understanding is that the nylon is there to reduce static electricity; some bronze brushes come without it). I use it before waxing to clean any debris or wax out of the bases and open the structure, and it's my first brush after scraping. After that I use white (hard) nylon and then horsehair. Brass or bronze, white nylon, and horsehair are what's in most brush kits, so that's what I went with. I get great results.

 

It sounds like you are suggesting that copper brushes don't exist and the he is mistaken about the type of brush he has. Copper brushes do exist so he certainly could have one.

post #9 of 21

Brushes, are like wax, there is no one size fits all.  Different brushes are used to achieve different results and what results you wish to achieve will be dependent on the conditions you will be skiing in.  Hard wax, soft wax, overlays, powders, then you have the type of snow you're going to be on.  Is it wet, dry, hard or icy.  Is it new snow or old snow.  Is the air temp warm but the snow is still firm and cold.  This would apply for racers only but has the course been salted.  There are sooooooooo many variables. 

 

What I'm getting at is even though we are only talking about brushes and you would think this would be a very simple  a b c answer, it is not quite as simple as you would think and the more you know about conditions, waxing, brushing, and tuning skis, the more complex the answer/s get. 

 

I'm sure all the tuners on this forum can remember back to when they first started working on skis and had 1 wax and 1 brush.  Things were so simple then, they certainly were a lot cheaper.  But, then we screwed it up and started learning more about waxing/brushing for different conditions and we continue to learn and the wax companies continue to come up with new and better products so it's pretty much always evolving. 

 

By now, the OP is probably thinking wtf, can't someone just say use these 2 or 3 brushes in this order and be done.  For the most part, yes, we can and Jacques suggestion of steel, brass/copper/bronze, horsehair and in that order will likely achieve what you want for a wide array of conditions.  Remember, always let the brushes bristles do the work.  Applying light to medium pressure, depending on the type of brush, is ok but pressing down hard is not what you want to do which is why I always tell people, brushing is just like filing, let the tool you're using do the work not your muscles.

post #10 of 21

Do yourself a favor and watch the ski tuning & waxing playlist on Jacques' YouTube playlist.  You will learn a lot about ski maintenance.  You want to use the steel and copper brushes to remove the old wax, clean the ski and open up the ski for the new wax.  After waxing use all three brushes with the horse hair last. The YouTube videos are long but very educational.

post #11 of 21

So when do you use a cork board?   My ski shop talked me into buying one of these, but I have no idea when to use it.  Cork on one side, felt on the other.  

 

Not sure when I should be using it...

 

After my nylon brush?

post #12 of 21
Cork is for heating a wax into the base. You rub hard so friction generates the heat.

Mostly it is used with overlays. I use one on cross country skis that I wax in the field for the conditions at hand. I have different corks for xc than I do for overlays.
post #13 of 21
post #14 of 21

If you're a racer, cork and felt are used for HF overlays but for the most part, overlays don't last very long so unless you are racing I don't see why you would use any overlays.

 

I have seen quite a few boarders and skiers in the parking area using cork and felt for some of these quickie rub on wax's.  I don't know how well this works, I suppose it's better than nothing, but I don't believe they will last very long.  I don't believe there is any substitute for a hot wax using the correct wax for the days conditions.  And there is certainly no substitute for good base wax saturation and the only way that happens is with a hot box or lots and lots of hot wax cycles.

 

So, unless you are doing some sort of HF overlay on your race skis, I doubt you'll ever use a cork very much.

post #15 of 21

Ok thanks for the reply...  

post #16 of 21
I'm glad the OP brought it up because this thread has. doubled or tripled my knowledge about brushes.
post #17 of 21

Here is a list of YouTube playlists on ski maintenance.  I'm ordering them like one would level a college class.  

 

Ski Maintenance 101 (One video that gives you the basics)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FcujBO4ksGE

 

Ski Maintenance 250 (Several short videos but you could do worse)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oKpSBE8YWXk&list=PL3iULOH9egqckrK0Z60fLcnLuK0g92yPm

 

Ski Maintenance 410 (If you are serious about knowing the skills, just skip to this one)

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCE6EC3798FC72CF1

 

Ski Maintenance 420 (You race?  You probably should watch these... too bad they haven't made their maintenance videos into a playlist)

http://www.youtube.com/user/thestarthaus/videos

post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by voghan View Post
 

Do yourself a favor and watch the ski tuning & waxing playlist on Jacques' YouTube playlist.  You will learn a lot about ski maintenance.  You want to use the steel and copper brushes to remove the old wax, clean the ski and open up the ski for the new wax.  After waxing use all three brushes with the horse hair last. The YouTube videos are long but very educational.


Thanks for that "vote".  I found the new series from The Start Haus to be very good and short.  He is working on skis without bindings which makes high end sidewall work easier.  There are also ways to sneak in around bindings, but if you are not a big racer don't get too worried about all that.  Start Haus did his videos voiced over and did a good job.  There are many ways and most are all good if the end result is what you are looking for.  Brush away by hand and have no worries.  I will say that I am to cheep to spend 150 plus dollars for a brush though!

post #19 of 21
Thread Starter 
Hi everybody,

Thanks for all the replies! And those Start Haus videos are really good!!!
post #20 of 21
Friend, congratulations for your interest in waxing. I have just started down that path as well and geared-up last week. Since then I have done the mandatory multiple hot wax prep on the skis. I started with a brass brush with a nylon perimeter, all to open the base pattern that helps to hold the wax. Between the wax coats I brushed with the brass brush. After around five coats, and final brass brushing I took out the nylon brush and spent several minutes buffing the base till smooth and shiny.
Both my wife and I skied today for the first time since i prepped our skis. The effect was quite noticeable. The skis traveled without any hesitation over soft snow conditions. My wife is the best judge of such things because she had no preconceived idea of the benefits of a well-waxed ski. And she was very pleased with the results, as was I.
Bottom line, from one neophyte to another, do not over think all this. Rather than research multiple videos as I did, look till you find one that makes sense and use it as your guide. That will get you 90% of the way there. For the remaining 10%, when all the snow melts, you will have lots of time to refine your technique.
D
post #21 of 21

Before waxing use a brass brush to clean out old wax and open the structure.

 

After scraping use a stiff nylon brush.  That is all you need.

 

After that if you want use a softer nylon brush.

 

If you really want to go to town, finish with a horsehair brush.

 

 

The stiff nylon after scraping is really enough though.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › What sort of brush should I use?