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My local shop did a bad thing

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I bought my lovely wife a pair of Blizzard Black Pearls and had the bindings mounted by the local shop. She has been on them six days since the beginning of the season. Today  I put them on the tuning bench for the first time and was shocked to find following

 

On both skis, the bases have been distorted by the mounting screws which were set too deep. While there is no breaching of the base surface, one is close. This is the worse of the two skis, but both have this flaw to greater and lesser degrees.

I have mounted bindings before with a buddy and recall that we had a drill bit that had a stop on it that limited the depth of the hole. This seems to be inexplicable for shop work.

I have not approached the shop and can't for the moment because we are leaving for Utah tomorrow. Just thinking ahead, I am concerned if a repair is offered. Even if they back out the screws, I assume that the bases will still be compromised, and perhaps the integrity of the skis. I would be real concerned about grinding the bases as well because that might expose the screw breaches.

Please share your thoughts on the severity and permanence of this defect and whether a repair or replacement is the right thing to expect.

Thanks,

D1

post #2 of 16
All I can say is wow, bummer! mad.gif Unless they're a reputable shop you have a relationship with I'd think twice about having them repaired, even if others here think they're repairable. I'd have the same concerns you do--the bases are drilled right through to the bases, which have been bent outward by the pressure, which may not make the ski patently unsafe to ski immediately, but affects maintenance and definitely the resale value. My sympathies, though. IMO,they should pay her demo fees so she can at least be on the ski during vacation.
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post

All I can say is wow, bummer! mad.gif Unless they're a reputable shop you have a relationship with I'd think twice about having them repaired, even if others here think they're repairable. I'd have the same concerns you do--the bases are drilled right through to the bases, which have been bent outward by the pressure, which may not make the ski patently unsafe to ski immediately, but affects maintenance and definitely the resale value. My sympathies, though. IMO,they should pay her demo fees so she can at least be on the ski during vacation.

Actually,I do know the shop manager and have done business there for a long time. I do not anticipate any serious resistance. I just want to know if an offer to repair would be reasonable. Bummer for certain, though. And even more bizarre.

D1

post #4 of 16
Usually you can backout the screws with no problem and the base will be fine. having said that sometimes you have to remount and change the holes. if you do this I would have the base stone ground again. have them look at them at a shop where you are skiing and then make your decision. if the shop says you need a new pair I would call where you had to work done and tell them that. having worked in a ski shop I would tell you that that's absolutely ridiculous work
post #5 of 16
To fix: have the shop back the screws all the way out, put epoxy in the hole, use shorter screws (duh), flatten any residual bumps (they should go way down when the screws are removed), and start negotiations for redress.

The holes may not have been drilled all the way in, forcing material to compress down to the bases, or the screws may have been too long, but I suspect the former. I don't think you will find the bases to be compromised, but as far as I'm concerned (as an ex-shop rat), the shop did shoddy work and needs to make it up to you.

But just between us, the skis are probably fine if the shop fixes them right per the above.
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

Usually you can backout the screws with no problem and the base will be fine. having said that sometimes you have to remount and change the holes. if you do this I would have the base stone ground again. have them look at them at a shop where you are skiing and then make your decision. if the shop says you need a new pair I would call where you had to work done and tell them that. having worked in a ski shop I would tell you that that's absolutely ridiculous work

Good Idea. I will have the shop at Pow Mou look at them for a recommendation.

D1

post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

The holes may not have been drilled all the way in, forcing material to compress down to the bases, or the screws may have been too long, but I suspect the former. 

Makes sense, Bob. When I did the mount of another pair with a pal, seems that we tapped the hole, removing all the material before putting in the final screws. If that is not done, I presume that the material from the hole has no where to go but push towards the base. Yes?

D1

post #8 of 16

D1, they may have drilled the holes to the correct depth and failed to clean out the shavings before mounting the bindings to cause the bulge. Why would they have used longer than normal screws?

 

The repair suggestions above should get the job done.

 

Edit: Bob may be right that they short drilled the holes leaving too much material in there too.

post #9 of 16
Looks like either a tyrolia or salomon binding. Are there base bubbles under the toe piece? Is there a lifter or riser under the heel piece.
post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chenzo View Post

Looks like either a tyrolia or salomon binding. Are there base bubbles under the toe piece? Is there a lifter or riser under the heel piece.

There are bubbles under nearly all of the screw points. Skis are packed away for our departure tomorrow so I can not check the mfg. No adjunct riser. Just the binding out of the box. Significance?

 

D1

post #11 of 16

I imagine the screws are the correct length for mounting, and it's just excess material in the hole putting pressure at the point of least resistance - your bases.  The original holes may have stopped a smidge short.  You may be able to back out the screws, clean out any material within the holes, re-drill if necessary and then re-mount.  The bases should flatten once that pressure is removed.

 

Good luck with it.

post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinbad7 View Post

You may be able to back out the screws, clean out any material within the holes, re-drill if necessary and then re-mount.

I'd be a bit careful about re-drilling. Actually, I wouldn't do that at all because it might compromise the existing threads in the hole. What I'd do is check for loose material, and if I didn't find any I'd get shorter screws or grind down the ones you have.
post #13 of 16

Let the store know what's happened asap.  If something is amiss with their approach you might stop them from repeating the same problem on a bunch of new mounts.

post #14 of 16
You dont want to use shorter screws you want to always use the correct screws. sometimes you can back them out use glue and remount. the shop you take them to will know what to do.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sinbad7 View Post

You may be able to back out the screws, clean out any material within the holes, re-drill if necessary and then re-mount.

I'd be a bit careful about re-drilling. Actually, I wouldn't do that at all because it might compromise the existing threads in the hole. What I'd do is check for loose material, and if I didn't find any I'd get shorter screws or grind down the ones you have.
post #15 of 16
Is the ski thin? Volkl kendos are very thin, and if you didn't grind the screws you would bubble the base from standard length screws.

Another scenario when this happens is the tech installs the binding without the riser.

I am afraid to say that those bumps are likely not going to disappear completely. Best way to fix is to remove binding, heat area, and hammer flat. Then stone grind. And grind screws.
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

You dont want to use shorter screws you want to always use the correct screws. sometimes you can back them out use glue and remount. the shop you take them to will know what to do.

The screws don't have to be significantly shorter - look at the picture. We're talking like 1/16 of an inch, 1/8 at the most. That isn't going to affect the holding strength of the screws significantly.

What do you think the shop is going to do, other than redrill in a different location and move the bindings?
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