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Expanding Brakes

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I know this might be bit of a gimmick, but I recently saw a pair of bindings with brakes that contracted next to the heel when you stepped in.  E.g. they looked too narrow, but when you pop out they actually fit the ski.  Any idea what they might have been?

post #2 of 14

Where did you see them? What were they on? Linky?

post #3 of 14

My Look PX15 expand and then drop.  My old Marker M48's did the same thing.  Old Tyrolia 360's actually rotated as they went up and down (neat design, but I never thought it was the best brake, but it was around for a longtime).

 

On higher end bindings you will general see that they come in closer to the bindings so that they don't interfere with edging the ski.

 

Years ago, a lot of after market brakes didn't do that (yes really old bindings didn't have brakes) and when brakes came along there was a bunch of aftermarket brake designs.

 

What we have now is a god send.

post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinHK View Post
 

I know this might be bit of a gimmick, but I recently saw a pair of bindings with brakes that contracted next to the heel when you stepped in.  E.g. they looked too narrow, but when you pop out they actually fit the ski.  Any idea what they might have been?

Could be a troll but maybe not. All binding brakes do this.

post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 

Nope, not a troll!  It wasn't the normal pop up/down, it was a side-to-side expansion, which it seems like some other people have seen too. 

 

Again, I'm not sure of the functional benefits (actually seems like one more thing to break) but if one of my contenders for Bonafide bindings had it I might have considered it.  It was probably the PX15s since they were a current year demo ski.

post #6 of 14

I haven't yet seen a pair of brakes that don't contract next to the heel piece when up and expand (obviously) when they are released. Maybe there are such brakes but none that I've seen in the last 10 years (not that they are that new--only that I can't remember bindings back any further than that.)

post #7 of 14

Intrigued to learn exactly how fixed heel brakes open and close horizontally while moving vertically, since there's no such thing when it comes to free heel i.e. NTN brakes. 

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinHK View Post
 

Nope, not a troll!  It wasn't the normal pop up/down, it was a side-to-side expansion, which it seems like some other people have seen too. 

 

Again, I'm not sure of the functional benefits (actually seems like one more thing to break) but if one of my contenders for Bonafide bindings had it I might have considered it.  It was probably the PX15s since they were a current year demo ski.

I meant no disrespect but it happens around here from time to time. All brakes need to pull in as well as up otherwise they might drag in the snow at extreme angulation. FWIW I'm a big fan of the PX binding series and have 6 pairs. Huge elasticity range, simple design and have been around almost forever. The only disadvantage is you need to press hard to get out of them so no flimsy carbon poles please.

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Lutes View Post
 

Intrigued to learn exactly how fixed heel brakes open and close horizontally while moving vertically, since there's no such thing when it comes to free heel i.e. NTN brakes. 

Ha. Back in the day we didn't bother with brakes on tele skis--we just used a leash since with tele skis when you fall you get beaten by the ski anyway. I did learn the hard way not to tie the leash to the bail of a three pin binding. 

post #10 of 14

Double Ha; we were so pathetic we used shoe laces as leashes back in the day.  Still perplexed, however, regarding horizontal retraction/extension of fixed heel brakes.  NTN brakes (and old 7TM, as well), are one continuous piece of metal rod - manually bendable, but otherwise, nyet.  Are the fixed heel brakes actually two separate pieces with some kind of spring loaded center piece??

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Lutes View Post
 

Double Ha; we were so pathetic we used shoe laces as leashes back in the day.  Still perplexed, however, regarding horizontal retraction/extension of fixed heel brakes.  NTN brakes (and old 7TM, as well), are one continuous piece of metal rod - manually bendable, but otherwise, nyet.  Are the fixed heel brakes actually two separate pieces with some kind of spring loaded center piece??

I have to assume so but I've never taken one apart.

post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Lutes View Post

Double Ha; we were so pathetic we used shoe laces as leashes back in the day.  Still perplexed, however, regarding horizontal retraction/extension of fixed heel brakes.  NTN brakes (and old 7TM, as well), are one continuous piece of metal rod - manually bendable, but otherwise, nyet.  Are the fixed heel brakes actually two separate pieces with some kind of spring loaded center piece??

The section that goes under heel is not straight across but bent into a W shape. As the boot clicks in the heel push the W into a premolded plastic and tighten the space between the bends so the two arms gets closer to each other.
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
 All brakes need to pull in as well as up otherwise they might drag in the snow at extreme angulation. FWIW I'm a big fan of the PX binding series and have 6 pairs. Huge elasticity range, simple design and have been around almost forever. The only disadvantage is you need to press hard to get out of them so no flimsy carbon poles please.

 

Fair enough.  I probably never noticed on my skis since the effect was much more pronounced on the pair I was looking at (e.g. two fat skis side by side, one with the brakes tucked over the ski, the other with them hanging out).

 

Anyway, now I know (even though I started skiing at 7... still learning!)

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post


The section that goes under heel is not straight across but bent into a W shape. As the boot clicks in the heel push the W into a premolded plastic and tighten the space between the bends so the two arms gets closer to each other.

 

An elegant design - thanks JZ!

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