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Finding a ski partner

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

How do you go about finding a ski partner?

Skiing is a little different than other activities, because both you and your partner need to be about the same skill level as well as have enough in common to make riding the chair enjoyable.

 

I don't have a lot of friends - I tend to go it alone rather than always be with a group of people - but skiing in the trees and off-piste is something that I must do with another person for safety sake.

 

Appreciate hearing how you found your ski partners.

post #2 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Skier View Post
 

How do you go about finding a ski partner?

Skiing is a little different than other activities, because both you and your partner need to be about the same skill level as well as have enough in common to make riding the chair enjoyable.

 

I don't have a lot of friends - I tend to go it alone rather than always be with a group of people - but skiing in the trees and off-piste is something that I must do with another person for safety sake.

 

Appreciate hearing how you found your ski partners.

Are you looking for a ski buddy locally or for trips elsewhere?  Very different processes.

 

For my trips out west, going to gatherings or small "meet ups" was a good way to start.  When I started, I had a friend or two who was a better skier but willing to ski some runs with me.  Then we would ski separately and meet up for lunch or at the end of the day.  Or we would ski somewhere that it was easy to choose different routes and meet up at the bottom of a lift.

post #3 of 21

 Personalities,skill level,schedules. It either works or it doesn't. You can always ask someone to make a tree run/ski partner if you hit it off on the ride up.

post #4 of 21
After returning to skiing a few years ago I met my ski partners here on Epicski. The timing was sorta a fluke as a gathering was scheduled not long after I joined the site. I showed up a day or two early and was welcomed with open arms. More weeks than not a small group of us gets together to enjoy the snow and camaraderie.
post #5 of 21

I ski by myself every week and usually just ask another single if I can ride the lift with them.  Usually if the conversation takes off we'll end up skiing together for several runs or the whole night.

 

Now I'm running into those same people again at the hill.   It helps to ski at a smaller region hill for this type of thing to happen.

post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Skier View Post

 

I tend to go it alone rather than always be with a group of people - but skiing in the trees and off-piste is something that I must do with another person for safety sake.

 

 

I agree with not skiing the trees alone, but there are plenty of wide open off-piste areas that I think are perfectly safe to ski alone.  It's really a question of how likely someone is to see you if something bad happens, and in a big open bowl it's pretty likely.  

 

I end up skiing alone a lot for various reasons.  When I do, I run an app on my phone so my wife can see where I am at all times.  That only works if you ski where there is data service.   There are several good threads on skiing alone if you you search.

post #7 of 21
I regularly ski alone, but have been skiing at the same hill for ten years, so I add and drop people throughout the day. There are treed areas I ski alone, but I am extremely careful about my route and stop a lot to judge subsurface conditions, all the time the phrase, "you are being SO STUPID" is going through my head. But... Yesterday was so good I couldn't let lack of buddy keep me from some of the untracked!!! Except for the tree well issue, I often find myself to be my best company. No arguments about where next, how fast, need for breaks, etc. No politics. It is really really rare to find the perfect day in, day out, ski partner. I go through stages when I ski with a person a lot and then suddenly I can't stand it anymore.
post #8 of 21

Have a kid and don't let him take up basketball.

post #9 of 21

Powder days on Aspen Mountain everyone bee lines to chair 6 ASAP.   During the 80's, first one there was either him or me.  Being the two fastest guys, we eventually just started skiing together and are now best friends.

He still skis everyday and can kick my ass now, but we still ski together whenever I'm in town.

post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
Except for the tree well issue, I often find myself to be my best company. No arguments about where next, how fast, need for breaks, etc. No politics. It is really really rare to find the perfect day in, day out, ski partner. I go through stages when I ski with a person a lot and then suddenly I can't stand it anymore.

Agree with Sib. When I'm not skiing with my wife (which is 90% of the time; we are compatible skiers), I tend to ski alone and like it. I have a few friends who ski at my level, but not many, and they're often on different season passes than me. I try to avoid skiing an groups larger than 4 for the reasons stated above...unless they are all really good skiers with compatible personalities and the same taste in terrain. Getting 4 of those people together is very rare, but when it works, it's fun. A meet-up would be a good way to go. 

post #11 of 21
Look for ski clubs in your area or join a 'meetup' group in your area (or start a meet up group)
http://www.meetup.com/
post #12 of 21

If your mountain has them, sign up for one of those progressive locals clinics. Some places have them once a week for six weeks or so. Some have them separated by age or gender. You'll be paired with local skiers of similar ability.

 

Or become a volunteer for your local adaptive program (if they have one).

 

Teach.

post #13 of 21

I ride the lift solo and chat the strangers up. If it's my home mountain, usually find tourists that are looking for someone to show them the goods. If i'm somewhere else, it's the opposite. 

post #14 of 21
Why don't you ski with the friends you mention in your other thread?
Edited by mtcyclist - 2/22/14 at 9:37am
post #15 of 21
Maybe he feels like an anchor. I don't mind skiing with people who are slightly better than I am, but HATE always feeling like I'm holding someone up.
post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I'm an anchor for those guys. They're kind to let me ski with them 1x or 2x a year, but I can't ski regularly with them.

They go through packed powder like it's a groomer run. Absolutely amazing to watch them glide down the hills.
post #17 of 21
If I only skied (or rode a bike for that matter) with partners, I'd be doing a whole lot less of both.

Killington for some reason is one mountain I never skied alone, but for whatever reason, it's been more hit or miss everywhere else.

Partnering up is great, but I still have plenty of fun solo, and never pass up an opportunity to chat it up with whomever I'm riding the chair with. Sometimes I'll even end up skiing with them.

IME, it's harder to find someone you're compatible enough to ride with, and at least for road riding, often safer to go solo.
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Skier View Post

How do you go about finding a ski partner?


Skiing is a little different than other activities, because both you and your partner need to be about the same skill level as well as have enough in common to make riding the chair enjoyable.

I don't have a lot of friends - I tend to go it alone rather than always be with a group of people - but skiing in the trees and off-piste is something that I must do with another person for safety sake.

Appreciate hearing how you found your ski partners.

Join EpicSki and ask if there are any locals who want to meet up with you. A lot of folks here are AMAZING skiers with whom the average bear can't hope to ski. But they're generous and will take a run or two with a fellow bear. And then there are the rest of us mere mortals. We're usually happy to meet up and ski with another bear. I've met a number of my regular ski buddies through the site.

As someone else suggested, definitely go to a Gathering. Will let you ski with a variety of people and find others at a similar skill level.
post #19 of 21

It's really pretty simple.  Just decide roughly where you plan to ski and check out the Getting Together, Gatherings and Let's Go forum area and the Groups forum area.  See if there are already conversations there that include your favorite ski resort.  If there are, post in them expressing interest to ski a certain day and locals almost always respond.  If you don't see one there feel free to start one.

Off you go!

:ski:ski 

post #20 of 21

I have a strange work schedule that usually allows for midweek skiing and weekend working. Because of the unorthodox schedule I go to the mountain solo, A LOT. If i'm ever in need of some company I just ski over to the double chair and hop on with another single, if our chat went well I would ask to ski together, about 3 turns into the run you can tell if they are right for you or not. If they are too slow, say goodbye, if they are too fast, tell them to be on their way.. Its that easy. 

Just last week a 6 minutes chair lift conversation turned into a half day of skiing and multiple rounds at the bar that night with a really interesting dude! 

post #21 of 21

I am seasonally unemployed, so I am lucky enough to ski whenever I want.  Here in NY, the city crowd swarms the mountains on the weekends, and its just not worth it to me.  Midweek, its like a ghost town.  Most days, I'm amazed they are even running the lifts for the handful of people that showed up.  Often its really hard to even get on a chairlift with someone, because there are so few people.  

 

I guess you just have to keep trying though.  You might not find someone to ski with every time, but if you get a chance to ride up with someone, and have a chat, you might meet your future ski buddy for life.  I like to ski bumps, and at my home mountain, the best bump run is under the lift.  If I see a skier that looks like they are really into it, I'll chase them down and start a conversation.  I've met a lot of really cool people this way.  Worst case scenario, they don't want to ski with you.  You don't have much to lose by trying.  

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