or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › First time buyer [in NYC, beginner/intermediate]
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

First time buyer [in NYC, beginner/intermediate]

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hello all, I've been skiing 6 times and I've found myself enjoying it more and more each time. I have, for a while now, wanted to get my own skis, but a recent outing in which I (who have only ever done one intermediate run before), accidently went down a black diamond trail, and I don't want to say I nailed it, but I was thoroughly impressed with how well I did. Now I feel committed to getting my own gear and making this a regular part of my life, but being an I.T. guy from NYC, my knowledge ski types and sizes is limited at best. From reading up on sizing charts I think I'm going to need 153-155cm skis, but I could be wrong. My stats are as follows: I'm male, 5'11" tall and 103 (no that's not a mistake, I am actually one-hundred and three pounds), and about a size 10.5-11 shoe. I would, after my recent experience, classify myself as an intermediate skier. So, does anyone have any suggestions as to what size skis I should be looking to get? I don't see myself doing anything but the groomed trails in the Poconos, maybe some of the bigger places in upstate NY (as I understand snow type and conditions make a difference).

post #2 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by VCElliott88 View Post
 

Hello all, I've been skiing 6 times and I've found myself enjoying it more and more each time. I have, for a while now, wanted to get my own skis, but a recent outing in which I (who have only ever done one intermediate run before), accidently went down a black diamond trail, and I don't want to say I nailed it, but I was thoroughly impressed with how well I did. Now I feel committed to getting my own gear and making this a regular part of my life, but being an I.T. guy from NYC, my knowledge ski types and sizes is limited at best. From reading up on sizing charts I think I'm going to need 153-155cm skis, but I could be wrong. My stats are as follows: I'm male, 5'11" tall and 103 (no that's not a mistake, I am actually one-hundred and three pounds), and about a size 10.5-11 shoe. I would, after my recent experience, classify myself as an intermediate skier. So, does anyone have any suggestions as to what size skis I should be looking to get? I don't see myself doing anything but the groomed trails in the Poconos, maybe some of the bigger places in upstate NY (as I understand snow type and conditions make a difference).

Welcome to EpicSki!  I'm going to move this thread to Ski Gear because you are more likely to get suggestions.

 

Have you read the EpicSki articles about buying gear?  Have you noticed that the more important first purchase is boots?

 

Note that the rating of trails (green, blue, black) is only relevant to the one ski area.  A black in a smaller ski area in a region like the Poconos can easily be much easier than a blue elsewhere.

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the tips, and i didn't know that trail difficulty is relative, i always though there were some generally agreed upon standards that a trail had to meet to get a certain difficulty. I appreciate the info, and i'll check out those buyers guides, and i had planned on getting skis and boots together.

post #4 of 6

Buy boots first.  FInd someone that knows what they are doing.  Don't buy from a big sports store or online.  You will want a custom footbed and if the boots need adjustments they can do it on the spot.  As for skis, I'd go out and see what a store rep sizes you at then go rent at those sizes.  When I rented they kept on giving me skis that were was too small for me and boots that where too big.  You can normally find great deals in Skis in March through October.  They want to sell what they have to make room for next years products.  Also, ski boots are meant to fit tight so if its comfortable in the store...its too big.  They shouldn't pinch or hurt but should feel very snug.  After you ski on them a few times they will adjust to you.

post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by VCElliott88 View Post
 

Thanks for the tips, and i didn't know that trail difficulty is relative, i always though there were some generally agreed upon standards that a trail had to meet to get a certain difficulty. I appreciate the info, and i'll check out those buyers guides, and i had planned on getting skis and boots together.

Although it may seem logical to get skis and boots together, it's not necessarily the best strategy.  There are advantages to buying good boots first, then continuing to rent skis while you learn more about the options available.  Or simply buying basic skis knowing that you will replace them within a year or two.  Used skis can be fine, but better if they are only 2-3 years old.

 

That said, if your local ski shop has a deal on skis then not much risk to go ahead and get them.

 

Don't worry that much about getting a custom footbed at the start.  That can be added later.  Note that a custom footbed can last 10-20 years and can be moved to another boot.  However, it is worth getting a generic after-market footbed instead of using the one that comes in the boot.

post #6 of 6

As others have said, boots first.  Skis are secondary.  With properly fitted boots I can get on just about any ski, even a badly tuned rental ski and have a pretty good time.  And I can and do notice os of subtle differences between different skis that I would not and never did notice with boots that don't actually fit.  I spent a lot of money chasing improvement in skiing by buying new hot skis and it was money wasted because I then tried to find the cheapest boot possible.  I've owned boots as large as 27.5 but my current boots, which fit quite nicely are 26.0 and I can wear 25.5.  When I was finally talked into getting boots that actually fit, my skiing improved instantly because I could totally control the skis and controlling your skis is what it's about.  The boot is your connection to the ski, it transmits your intention to the ski.  If your boot are 2-3 sizes too big(very common), when you want to turn, your foot has to move inside the boot before it can relay that information to the ski.  The natural inclination is to then tighten the buckles more and then some more until the circulation to the feet is impeded resulting to pain and cold feet.  If that is how you want to ski, then by all means, go to a big box store and buy boots and skis from some kid who probably doesn't even ski and knows absolutely nothing about how a ski boot is supposed to fit.  Then you can do it all over again in 1-2 seasons because your feet will be in pain most of the time.  OTOH, if you would rather not experience that pain and don't want to have to buy new boots every 1-2 seasons, you need to see a genuine boot fitter and you happen to be in luck living in NYC.  There are two very qualified fitters in your area, well at least one anyway.

 

Jeff Rich

U.S. Orthotic Center

515 Madison Avenue
New York NY 10022

email: drbalance@msn.com

(212) 832-1648

 

John Mihlik

404 Warren Street

Scotch Plains, NJ 07076

johnnyatomic9@hotmail.com

 

After you get boots that actually fit your feet, then you worry about skis.

 

And what marznc said about rating for runs is absolutely true.  I've skied in the midwest and have seen "black" runs there that would barely be considered a blue run out here in the Rockies.  I can ski all the double blacks at my home area. Red Lodge Mountain, but there are double blacks at other areas that I would never even consider trying.  It is all relative to each area.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › First time buyer [in NYC, beginner/intermediate]