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Need a crappy ski resort in upstate NY

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Tried to teach the wife how to ski at Bristol. She has an anxiety disorder and didn't like all the people and the chairlifts. I am looking for a place that has few people and many t-bar lifts to see if she progress in baby steps to the next level. We live in Rochester, so somewhere near there.

Thanks in advance,

Solarity
post #2 of 21

Swain may be a little more low key, but the beginner terrain at Bristol is better, especially the Morningstar area.

If you can arrange to get to Bristol on a non holiday weekday, I'm sure you'll find it much less crowded, especially between the time when the old folks quit (about 10:30) and 3:00 when the kids start to arrive for ski club.

 

Can't say I'd recommend a T-Bar for a beginner if a chair lift was available..........................!

post #3 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by John V. View Post
 

Swain may be a little more low key, but the beginner terrain at Bristol is better, especially the Morningstar area.

If you can arrange to get to Bristol on a non holiday weekday, I'm sure you'll find it much less crowded, especially between the time when the old folks quit (about 10:30) and 3:00 when the kids start to arrive for ski club.

 

Can't say I'd recommend a T-Bar for a beginner if a chair lift was available..........................!

John, be careful what you say.  Why not come out and join them for a run or two?

post #4 of 21

I never recommend nor condone anyone trying to teach their SO, child, cousin, nephews, nieces, etc how to ski.  99+% of the time it does not turn out well.  Being a competent skier doesn't qualify anyone to teach someone else, unless all the person wants to do is teach their own bad habits to someone else.  Get her a private lesson with a female level 2 or 3 instructor and discuss her anxiety with the instructor before hand.

post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 

I never recommend nor condone anyone trying to teach their SO, child, cousin, nephews, nieces, etc how to ski.  99+% of the time it does not turn out well.  Being a competent skier doesn't qualify anyone to teach someone else, unless all the person wants to do is teach their own bad habits to someone else.  Get her a private lesson with a female level 2 or 3 instructor and discuss her anxiety with the instructor before hand.

Yes!

 

Also, unless the beginner has a real fear of heights, a chair is an awful lot easier to use than a T bar.

post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 
I do prefer someone teaching her than me. She has anxiety with heights (planes and farris wheels), she refused to try a chairlift. She doesn't mind falling. She used the convior style lift, but we could walk quicker.
post #7 of 21
Quote:
between the time when the old folks quit (about 10:30)

Seeing as how I can collect Social Security as of today, I was including myself in the group! (although my days are usually much longer than 10:30).  :D

post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 

I never recommend nor condone anyone trying to teach their SO, child, cousin, nephews, nieces, etc how to ski.  99+% of the time it does not turn out well.  Being a competent skier doesn't qualify anyone to teach someone else, unless all the person wants to do is teach their own bad habits to someone else.  Get her a private lesson with a female level 2 or 3 instructor and discuss her anxiety with the instructor before hand.


Teaching a SO is damn near impossible.  Not because of the bad habits and all that "pro instructor" line of b.s.  Your wife is emotionally connected and is going to expect you to care and sympathize with her when she is "scared".  Any one but you - even drunk Uncle Bob on his old straight skis - will force her to muster up some confidence.  Like a toddler that cries whenever mom's around because it thinks mom makes it "all better", your wife is pre-programmed to save that out of control run not by ditching or remembering to turn, but heading straight for the "safety" of your personal space.  Very bad for your health.  Multiply that by 100x if she is the "nervous" type. 

 

I tried to teach my wife 10 years ago.  Now I teach my kids.  Then they compete to teach mom.  It's funny.  But she's got to a competent wedge turn in about three sessions, and compared to the rest of the folks skiing the crappy little hill we live near, including the ones in the group lessons, you have to wonder if it's easier to learn from a bossy 4 y.o. than it is from the "pro" instructors here.

 

But seriously, here's my advice on where to go.  Take her to the local golf course and let her get comfortable running down some bluffs and just have her sidestep her way up.  Probably the worst place for someone with anxiety disorder to learn to ski is a "bunny hill" where they are surrounded by people falling down. 

post #9 of 21

Id go to Gore, IMO its the best mountain in NY

post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 

We took our neighbors oldest out for skating, TBH I think it helped my wife. It was both of their first time to go skating, though as she seems to worry more about others than herself, I think if she is worrying about the other person, then it will get her mind off herself. I guess this makes sense, why she went into social work.

 

I think you guys. She uses me as a bail-out option. I need to do that or get someone else that she is comfortable to do a lesson with.

 

Three years ago I bought a boat. First time out she was balling ><

 

It took a few times out and now she likes it. Granted I can't go fast and she only likes it when me or someone else that is very experienced with boats captains.

 

We did cross country for the first time a few years ago, she loves it and laughs when she falls down. The funny thing there are hills that are more intimidating in XC than the double diamond on the slope is and she manages fine on skis that have no metal edges and no hill attached.  She some how knows how to snow plow w/ XC skis, but not with downhill skis?

 

She does have an anxiety problem and does take adivan, when she goes on a plane.

post #11 of 21
As a level 1-2 instructor your suggestion is perfect.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

I never recommend nor condone anyone trying to teach their SO, child, cousin, nephews, nieces, etc how to ski.  99+% of the time it does not turn out well.  Being a competent skier doesn't qualify anyone to teach someone else, unless all the person wants to do is teach their own bad habits to someone else.  Get her a private lesson with a female level 2 or 3 instructor and discuss her anxiety with the instructor before hand.
post #12 of 21
your pro instructor remark is uncalled for. one of the best things instructors are taught is how to take the anxiety out of people so they have fun while they are learning. a shame you couldn't come up with a few bucks to help your wife.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdeangel View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

 
I never recommend nor condone anyone trying to teach their SO, child, cousin, nephews, nieces, etc how to ski.  99+% of the time it does not turn out well.  Being a competent skier doesn't qualify anyone to teach someone else, unless all the person wants to do is teach their own bad habits to someone else.  Get her a private lesson with a female level 2 or 3 instructor and discuss her anxiety with the instructor before hand.


Teaching a SO is damn near impossible.  Not because of the bad habits and all that "pro instructor" line of b.s.  Your wife is emotionally connected and is going to expect you to care and sympathize with her when she is "scared".  Any one but you - even drunk Uncle Bob on his old straight skis - will force her to muster up some confidence.  Like a toddler that cries whenever mom's around because it thinks mom makes it "all better", your wife is pre-programmed to save that out of control run not by ditching or remembering to turn, but heading straight for the "safety" of your personal space.  Very bad for your health.  Multiply that by 100x if she is the "nervous" type. 

I tried to teach my wife 10 years ago.  Now I teach my kids.  Then they compete to teach mom.  It's funny.  But she's got to a competent wedge turn in about three sessions, and compared to the rest of the folks skiing the crappy little hill we live near, including the ones in the group lessons, you have to wonder if it's easier to learn from a bossy 4 y.o. than it is from the "pro" instructors here.

But seriously, here's my advice on where to go.  Take her to the local golf course and let her get comfortable running down some bluffs and just have her sidestep her way up.  Probably the worst place for someone with anxiety disorder to learn to ski is a "bunny hill" where they are surrounded by people falling down. 
post #13 of 21
Who are you calling old! I am 66 and I never quit before 330!
Quote:
Originally Posted by John V. View Post

Quote:
between the time when the old folks quit (about 10:30)
Seeing as how I can collect Social Security as of today, I was including myself in the group! (although my days are usually much longer than 10:30).  biggrin.gif
post #14 of 21
If you think she can deal with a rope tow you might want to try Powder Mill Park right here in rochester. Doesn't get any more laid back than that place. I brought my son there for his first time out back when he was 4 or 5. I believe that they offer lessons also.
Edited by DMAS - 2/21/14 at 12:29pm
post #15 of 21

If you want to try a great ski area in Western New York check out Buffalo Ski Club. It's located outside of Buffalo. Actually, there running an end-of-year sale on passes right now. It's a BOGO offer for only $25. Here's the link: http://buffalo.sweetdealscumulus.com/

post #16 of 21

Wait, she doesn’t like chairlifts?

How will she ever like resort skiing ?

post #17 of 21
I remember holding on to the chair in a death grip for over two years. As lessons gave me more confindance I became comfortable with the chair. Being on a chair that has a bar that comes over your head really helps
post #18 of 21

Brantling. T-bar and 4 handle tows.  250' of vert. Produced an Olympian. I went once on a mid-week on a heavy powder day  to try my new Manaslu's. The slope serviced by the T-bar wasn't groomed and I was the only one riding it. Had a personal liftie. Groomers weren't empty but not busy. It's close enough to you that if the snow or crowd is bad you can drop by Shutts Cider Mill on the way home to salvage trip. They use a special cider making process.  Produces clear sweet cider unlike any other. Get  doughnut.s 6 fried cakes and 6 glazed.  Eat/Drink on the way home. I miss it.

post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by John V. View Post
Can't say I'd recommend a T-Bar for a beginner if a chair lift was available..........................!

 

When I first arrived At Sugarbush from a ski area with a chairlift on the beginner hill I looked at the Poma lift and thought "this is going to be a problem". I've since decided that for skiers it's the perfect lift, as you have to ski uphill. If you have a competent person to ride the T bar with them and talk them through it so much the better I would think. You get to learn how to stand and let the skis glide without the fear of gravity taking over.

 

It has since been replaced by a conveyor belt which is much easier for snowboarders to negotiate. Funny thing is, it's so slow many boarders walk instead of ride if there is any kind of line.     

Quote:
Originally Posted by gdeangel View Post
 


Teaching a SO is damn near impossible.  Not because of the bad habits and all that "pro instructor" line of b.s.  

Your wife is emotionally connected and is going to expect you to care and sympathize with her when she is "scared".

 

The real problem that I see with most SO lessons is that at it's heart skiing is incredibly easy. Stay ahead of your feet, roll and point your feet where you want to go, and enjoy the ride. The problem is, until you know you are not going to die it is next to impossible to stay ahead of your feet, roll and point your feet where you want to go, and enjoy the ride.  Most of the ""pro instructor" line of b.s." consists of understanding how to chose terrain and break down tasks into small enough increments to keep the fear down while the skills build. Because you know there nothing for YOU to fear it's easy to put scared in quotes and not realize mastering fear is part of learning any new skill. Another problem is that of the SO knowing you too well. I wouldn't go to any of my high school class mates as a doctor because I know what kind of screwups they were. As it happens my doctor may have been worse, but since I don't know that as a fact I can happily listen to his advice knowing only that he is trained to do his job.

 

I would like to know about your observational skills since you say                  

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gdeangel View Post
 


Any one but you - even drunk Uncle Bob on his old straight skis - will force her to muster up some confidence. 

 

  But she's got to a competent wedge turn in about three sessions, and compared to the rest of the folks skiing the crappy little hill we live near, including the ones in the group lessons, you have to wonder if it's easier to learn from a bossy 4 y.o. than it is from the "pro" instructors here.

 

 

If the instructors at your local hill aren't routinely getting the bulk of the people they teach to a competent wedge turn in an hour or two perhaps you need to send you drunk uncle Bob to be the training director.

post #20 of 21
Anyone could ski their first time..........
If their mind would let them!


Enter the instructor
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by solarity View Post

Tried to teach the wife how to ski at Bristol. She has an anxiety disorder and didn't like all the people and the chairlifts. I am looking for a place that has few people and many t-bar lifts to see if she progress in baby steps to the next level. We live in Rochester, so somewhere near there.

Thanks in advance,

Solarity

 

Trust me. I have experience in teaching my wife to ski and golf. The alpine lessons ended the first day and on an icy slope at Holiday Valley. 40 years ago. Her last alpine lesson from me and her last day ever on alpine gear.

 

But first, what is "the next level? What experience with skiing is she at now?

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