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shins hurt skiing [2nd season, PacNW]

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Greetings! I started skiing last year but now I notice a lot of shin pain. Maybe it's because it snowed a lot or because I'm skiing harder trails now. Don't know. That's why I want your help.

 

In crud or soft mogels, the burning pain in the shins intensifies very quickly. I have to stop all the time. From google-fu I think it is the tibialis anterior or peroneus. Do you think lessons would fix it? Or are there exercises to make it stronger? I want to get better at skiing but it hurts too much. :( 

post #2 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbster View Post
 

Greetings! I started skiing last year but now I notice a lot of shin pain. Maybe it's because it snowed a lot or because I'm skiing harder trails now. Don't know. That's why I want your help.

 

In crud or soft mogels, the burning pain in the shins intensifies very quickly. I have to stop all the time. From google-fu I think it is the tibialis anterior or peroneus. Do you think lessons would fix it? Or are there exercises to make it stronger? I want to get better at skiing but it hurts too much. :( 

Welcome to EpicSki!  Probably need to know more before you can get any useful suggestions.  Where are you skiing?  Are these rental boots or boots that you bought?  If they are your own boots, how did you choose the place where you bought them?

post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the welcome! It seems like a friendly place. :)

 

I am skiing at Stevens Pass and Crystal Mountain. I started trying blacks three weekends ago, but this weekend the burning shins were worse.

 

The boots are from Evo, a shop in Seattle. I went there because my friend got his skis there and it was easy to get to.

post #4 of 16
Are your boots holding your lower legs snugly or are there any play?
post #5 of 16
I am not sure what burning shin pain is... Are you saying your shins ache, are bruised, tender?

Shin bruising or similar discomfort is called shin bang. It usually comes from boots being too loose at the cuff. Your feet can't bruise if they can't move. Try tightening things down on the top two buckles.

In many cases the natural inclination for boot pain is to loosen the boots, but most cases pain is from too loose.

Tingling, numbness, and cold feet are associated with too tight. Bruising and cramping, and soreness in feet muscles are generally too loose sensations.
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 

My boots are pretty snug. At first I tightened them too much but now they are okay.

 

The shin pain is on the outside part of my shin. It gets worse when I am skiing but slowly subsides when I stop. On the groomed runs I can go longer before it bothers m. By the time I get home, I don't feel it anymore. I don't think they are bruised. That happened the first couple times I went skiing but not anymore.

post #7 of 16

I used to get this when I was in a boot with too much forward lean. It's that muscle that brings your toes up toward your shin, right? Pull your toes up and feel the muscle that flexes. If it is in that overly flexed position all day, it gets tired. At least mine did. It would even start cramping, which really sucks in a ski boot btw.

 

I'm not exactly sure how to fix it, I ended up with new boots. But I think trying a heel lift inside the boot will open up your ankle a bit more, and then you can see if that is what is wrong, at least.

post #8 of 16

Make sure you aren't tucking anything into your boot either.

 

Just the skiing sock and the boot should be down there.

post #9 of 16
Some people have unusually sharp shinbones. Tall skinny people are the usual suspects. Do your boots have a wrap type liner that overlaps in front of your shin or is there a flat padded tongue in front like a shoe?

With the wrap type liner (such as an Intuition) I've had trouble with shin pain.

http://www.manoove.com/

Take a look at Shintronics - maybe it'll help.
post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 

I think it might be the muscle that brings the toes up. Or it might be just outside of it. I can't tell exactly. I will see if I can try the heel lifts! Sad my wallet will be if I need to buy new boots.

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbster View Post
 

I think it might be the muscle that brings the toes up. Or it might be just outside of it. I can't tell exactly. I will see if I can try the heel lifts! Sad my wallet will be if I need to buy new boots.

Well, it's not the only reason I needed new boots ... just that I didn't spend any time trying to fix that issue in the old boots, and when I switched boots, it did fix that problem. I still have the sharp shinbone problem that Spikedog described.

post #12 of 16
What did you say the boot flex was?
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 

Oh, ok. Well I'm not tall and skinny. Maybe I won't get the sharp shinbone problem!

 

I think the boot flex is 80.

post #14 of 16

Boot issues can be very hard to diagnose.  Often its a simple fix, like making sure that NOTHING is tucked into your boot.  The only thing that should be inside any part of your boot is your foot and a well fitting sock.  

 

Sometimes its not so simple.  I don't know anything about the shop that sold you your boots, so I'm curious about the process they used to find you the right boot.  Did you pick one off the wall that looked good, or did the boot fitter select a few that he thought would best fit your anatomy?  Did they measure your foot, or did you simply tell them your shoe size?

 

You might want to consider a custom orthodic.  If you have flat feet, or high arches, or any other abnormal foot structure, your foot won't be supported well by the thin little wafer in the bottom of that boot.  A good orthodic will make sure your foot is properly supported. If it is not, there could be tension where it shouldn't be and it will pull on muscles when they should be relaxed.  It can also lead to various other foot issues.  

 

It is possible that your muscles are burning because they aren't strong enough, but typically this isn't the case.  You are using the same muscles to stand in ski boots as you do to stand in sneakers.  If you don't have problems normally, you shouldn't expect to have problems skiing.  

 

My reccomendation is to get to a GOOD boot fitter.  They can make an orthodic if necessary, and they can modify your boot to better accommodate your foot and ankle, and make sure that your boots aren't throwing off your stance and alignment.   

post #15 of 16

Shin bang is a very real and painful thing and much will depend on the brand of the boot and as well as the padding, how, depending on the shape of your leg the boot conforms to you.  Each boot is a bit different though the usual complaints are in the toe box (toe bang that leaves you with black infected toe nails) or heel lift that is critical and perhaps the most important part of how the boot will affect your skiing.  It's like a steering linkage in the drive line of your car, any flop or loose area and the "Porsche" is all over the track.

 

Going to a professional boot fiitter is probably the answer.  But they may not be able to make adjustments to the boots you bought.  Often they have used boots that may be better so be open to that since they get folks like myself in there who after years of pain (run over as a kid), I'd trade my first born to ski pain free.  Greg Hoffman did more than that, kept my boots and the adjustment left me pain free and the balance was outstanding.  I was a new me after 40+ years on skis.

 

This has to be said.  There is also a chance that you are skiing more and I noted your comment that you have been risking some black runs.  This also tells me that you are probably sitting back (a natural reaction when you fear steeper terrain.  Is the pain more intense if you are staying on the easier greens that are well groomed.  Crud and moguls are tough on all of us because the sudden braking effect in junk snow will pitch you forward of course.  Now, keep in mind that in a boot that fits very well and is snug there isn't the room for the movement and crash bang.

 

Martial Arts and skiing?  Yeah, there is something in common and be it knuckles or any other contact surface we "harden" by developing callouses or in the case of shins, (not to the extreme like Thai boxing) you eventually, through contact will deaden the nerves.

 

My shins would hurt like the blazes for the first week or two back in the boots after a lazy summer.  Once I realized it, and I don't expect you to do this, I would start to spend time kicking the heavy bag with my shins a few weeks before the season started.  Instructors don't aside from usually having a good fit, have any magic aside from having deadened most of the tender spots.

 

One of my initial thoughts would be to get your doc to prescribe a thin Lidoderm patch but that would probably just bunch, tear and blister being a bigger problem.

post #16 of 16

@newbster, have you seen this article?

 

http://www.epicski.com/a/boot-fitting-which-boot-will-work-for-me

 

So, you are in a 80 flex boot.....great, but that tells us next to nothing unfortunately. What boot is it exactly? Did EVO properly fit the boot or did you self-fit it?

You very well could be in the wrong boot or size of boot for you and your expanding skill set.


Edited by GorgeSkier - 2/23/14 at 5:42pm
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