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How is Park Skiing?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I never done it, though I have been watching a lot of it on the Olympics. Seems cool, yet dangerous. The place near my house has a park, though I have yet to make to that side of the mountain. How do people learn w/o killing themselves? At 32 I wonder if I am to old for it, though I have never been a skater, I do like moguls.

 

-Solarity

post #2 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by solarity View Post
 

I never done it, though I have been watching a lot of it on the Olympics. Seems cool, yet dangerous. The place near my house has a park, though I have yet to make to that side of the mountain. How do people learn w/o killing themselves? At 32 I wonder if I am to old for it, though I have never been a skater, I do like moguls.

 

-Solarity


There are different sizes/flavor of parks. Start out small, and work your way up.

post #3 of 19

Try not to squish any kids.

 

Make sure your health insurance is paid up.

post #4 of 19

it is not too old.  i would agree, any resort that advertises that they have parks will have a progression series, that start out with small features that might just a few lumps in a row and a box to ski on.

On/off piste you can also start looking for small natural lips or jumps to catch a little air.

 

Read the terrain park safety code, which also makes sense to carry over some of the principles to the regular piste.

 

http://www.nsaa.org/safety-programs/smart-style/

 

and of course, as always you can take a lesson

post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by solarity View Post
 

At 32 I wonder if I am to old for it....

 

 

 

I have to chuckle at your use of "32" and "too old" in  the same sentence...    I started skiing seven years ago at the age of 53.  Last year, egged on by my then 12-year-old daughter, I started trying jumps.  So far, I've not had more than 5-6 feet of air.  I'll never make the U.S. Olympic team, but that's not my goal.  As long as you don't panic, and don't stiffen up when landing, it's not that hard.  Try it!

post #6 of 19
Perhaps not too old a in physical age, but if you get hurt, the price you pay and impact on your life when you are in your 30s is much higher than when you are 16. So even at 31 I'm hesitant on trying park skiing.

That and I'm trying to suck less at on piste skiing first. biggrin.gif
post #7 of 19

I still dip in and hit the small and medium jumps.  Full disclosure though, three years ago I cracked a rib simply landing a little hard near the end of the LZ of a small jump.  I didn't fall, but it felt like somebody shot me and I was suddenly gasping to catch my breath after I bottomed out my knees sucking up the hard landing.  It was very near the end of the day and I skied two more runs, but couldn't sleep on one side for six weeks after that.  Getting old sucks!

post #8 of 19

At your age you should take park lessons. There are a lot of ways to seriously injure yourself in a park. Think of the lessons as insurance against yourself.

post #9 of 19
Some resorts have park specific classes. I am 36, started skiing last season, and took a woodward premium lesson a few weeks back (that is the i guess park version of classes). They start you doing some trampolines indoors and so on then you go outside and practice in the park. My instructor was probably 20 years younger than me and looked about 20 times cooler complete with baggy pants =) But he was surprisingly mature and insightful and was actually one of the best instructors I've had. I had tried the boxes and smallest jumps on my own before but having taken the class it made a huge difference. He taught me how to 'pop' which is to jump with a neutral balance, and you are supposed to pop on all jumps and boxes and so on. That gives you control so you are not just going off of the jump off balance due to the lip being weird. (some jumps send you up and out of balance if you do not pop yourself). Also learned to ski backwards properly etc. One great thing he taught me was to go through the park once or twice without hitting the features and observe others to see how fast people go on the jumps etc and not to just charge in and try it.

I have to say the park is very fun and is much easier than it first looks and one main reason I like to ski it is because my 5 year old is really impressed with it. I did bruise my ribs falling on a jump and now I wear body armor/back protector which makes me look like the hunchback of notre dame. I think the biggest danger in the park comes from people who fall and then stay below the jump where incoming people can't see you.
post #10 of 19

You should ask your question in the Patrol Shack forum.

post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
I just watched some kid tear his ACL on the half pipe ski event...ouch!

The snowboard cross looked fun...and less dangerous lol
post #12 of 19
In general it kind of sucks . Started age 14 got into the park at 20 no interest at age 23 now I'm 25.

Living in north nJ I started to spend more time in the park when the conditions were really shitty on the mountain .

You don't want right racing style boots because you will get turf toe . You want center mount twin tips helps a ton .

My best day in the park was probally as enjoyable as a good day skiing on an average conditions day. Though when the mountains icy as shit or slushy as poo , I didn't mind hanging out in the park . Now I just don't ski when the weather sucks.

Give it a shot
post #13 of 19
Also having some snowboarding friends helps they can explain neat things that made it easier for me
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by solarity View Post

I just watched some kid tear his ACL on the half pipe ski event...ouch!

The snowboard cross looked fun...and less dangerous lol

 

I'm 33 now, and spent a whole ton of time in the park in my early 20's. I don't do much of it at all anymore, mostly because my body just doesn't like it anymore. Skiing park beats you up pretty badly, and I'd rather wreck my knees over the course of the entire season in the trees and on bumps than over the course of one afternoon in the park.

 

Snowboard/skiercross... super dangerous, much more dangerous than slopestyle or the pipe. All the air of the other disciplines, but you're taking air with 5 other people in close proximity. It gets ugly with a capital U. I inflicted more damage on myself doing skiercross stuff than I ever did in the park or pipe.

post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by solarity View Post

I just watched some kid tear his ACL on the half pipe ski event...ouch!

The snowboard cross looked fun...and less dangerous lol

Tell that to Maria Komissarova, she dislocated her spine in training for the skier cross this week. What the hell I didn't even know you could dislocate a spine. 

That being said, The park is a blast. Its all about progression. If you go right to the biggest hit on the hill and strait line of course you are going to get hurt. Done correctly, the jumps are smooth and life in the air can be a blast. I have been riding a lot more pipe this season and a will planed out half pipe run is smooth and easy on the body. let gravity do its job and all is good.  

post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

 

I'm 33 now, and spent a whole ton of time in the park in my early 20's. I don't do much of it at all anymore, mostly because my body just doesn't like it anymore. Skiing park beats you up pretty badly, and I'd rather wreck my knees over the course of the entire season in the trees and on bumps than over the course of one afternoon in the park.

 

Snowboard/skiercross... super dangerous, much more dangerous than slopestyle or the pipe. All the air of the other disciplines, but you're taking air with 5 other people in close proximity. It gets ugly with a capital U. I inflicted more damage on myself doing skiercross stuff than I ever did in the park or pipe.

Then there's snowmobile cross.

post #17 of 19

Yeah start small and work up. Also if there is a table (flat part between jump and landing) speed is your friend. There is no better way, outside the half pipe, to jack your self up than coming up short on a jump. Seriously, if your mountain has properly built jumps it's pretty hard to seriously hurt yourself provided you make the landing. I have landed on my side/back with no feet hitting and it certainly doesn't feel good but you walk away with a bruise. I stressed fractured my foot coming up short on a 25 footer and have seen multiple people carted off after hitting the knuckle.

 

Starting off your going to feel like your going mach 5 into a jump only to barely clear the landing. Don't be afraid to ask questions most people are more than happy to give you pointers. Contrary to their rep most people in the park are super friendly and are excited to see everyone progressing whether it's your first air, first 360 or landing double corked. When I first learned to spin a 3 I had guy come up an tell me that was awesome. Latter in the day I saw the guy throwing 9s and rodeos. 

 

BTW the size of jumps is measured by the length of the table

post #18 of 19
Thread Starter 

I was messing around with some jumps that flanks a green. One of them was so steep that my skis decided not to stay on anymore. I might try to get a lesson in this as I think it might help my overall skill, though I don't see me doing flips.

post #19 of 19

I hit the park every once in a while, it's all about staying within your comfort zone. Take a jump or ski around it. Not everyone going down the hill is Gus Kenworthy.

 

Maybe the youngsters will snicker at you, but they're young and dumb anyhow.

 

& I'm 46.

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