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Need Ski help

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I got boots and poles and I like them both. I demo'ed about 6 skis and I was leaning to the Amphibio 14's, which were on sale for $499 at my Local shop, though they sold out of them, before I could buy some :(

 

I really liked how easily they blasted through everything crud and ice. They also seemed to turn on a dime. Someone did mention that skis with metal in them aren't the best for bumps. While I love bumps, there is only about 100ft of them on the mountain that is 38 minutes from my house. This place is the best place within hours of my house as well. My heart was initially set for the 14's, though I am hard pressed to find them again at that price at this point in the season. So I guess that leaves me wondering what should I do? Try to find a similar ski for about the same price point?

 

I tried the Amphibio 74's, which are currently selling for same price as the old 14's, though they are this year and the 14's were the previous year. I also liked them as the preformed close to the 14's, but my buddy said I skied much more aggressively with the 14's.

 

I also liked the 78ti's which I initially tested out, though the shop is selling this years for $650.

 

I am also wondering about skis that are more for moguls. Though seeing I am 32 and due to the lack of moguls around here I am wondering if this might not be such a good idea.

 

What I was skiing the other day was mostly regular groomed slopes, with some patches of ice with lots of crud at the end of every patch.

post #2 of 13

Where do you ski? I know that's a question that is bound to come up soon and pretty important to answering about what skis will work well for you and suit your needs.

 

Also, you mention moguls, but also skiing groomed, ice, and crud, which, to my eye (forgive if I'm wrong due to inexperience), seem to be four fairly divergent categories and somewhat exclusive even. I know from personal experience that buying a ski designed for sport performance down a groomer (like non-FIS race skis) is not built to handle bumps nor extensive crud. So, in what order are those types of skiing important to you?

 

Also, why do you like the Amphibio's so much? Are you willing to try other skis beside that brand?

 

This is a good starting point.

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmrobins3 View Post
 

Where do you ski? I know that's a question that is bound to come up soon and pretty important to answering about what skis will work well for you and suit your needs.

 

Also, you mention moguls, but also skiing groomed, ice, and crud, which, to my eye (forgive if I'm wrong due to inexperience), seem to be four fairly divergent categories and somewhat exclusive even. I know from personal experience that buying a ski designed for sport performance down a groomer (like non-FIS race skis) is not built to handle bumps nor extensive crud. So, in what order are those types of skiing important to you?

 

Also, why do you like the Amphibio's so much? Are you willing to try other skis beside that brand?

 

This is a good starting point.


I ski Bristol Mountain (38 mins away from my house now). I use to Ski Deer Valley, Utah over a decade ago. The place I ski now is a lot easier than what I use to do. I say the diamonds would be a a hard blue in Utah. When I say groomed, I am not going off trails at this time, I have done some skiing between trees, though that was a while back. When I say ice, I mean a sheet of ice, that sound of scraping when you go to stop and it hurts like hell when you fall. When I say crud, I am referring to the piles, of powdered that can catch your ski by surprise, if you are not paying attention. As I have been out of the sport for a while, my terminology could be badly phrased.

 

I tried out 5 skis my first time on the mountain this year. I liked the Amphibio the best, I came back this past weekend and tried 2 other Amphibio and liked them just as much as the first. I would consider myself an advance skier that can comfortably ski any part of the mountain. Granted I like bumps, though I am pretty slow on them. I don't want to ski at race speeds as I do not want to get injured and also would prefer more time going down the mountain than waiting in line to go back up. I would prefer finding a cheaper ski that gives me as much as a wow factor as the Amphibio's.

 

All I know is the following:

I like the ~168cm range

I don't see me skiing much powder if any at this time

I am 5'10" @ 180lbs

Ski where ice is expected

Like bumps, though don't have much opportunity to ski them.

 

I like the 14's, though the 78 TI might be a better ski for me as it is less stiff. I will seldom get up to speeds that will require a faster ski. I am wondering if the 76 (no metal) might be god enough though it is ranked as int-adv.

post #4 of 13

I don't have any personal experience with the Amphibio series, but I do have some friends who ski on Elans and have nothing but good things to say about them. The Amphibio series is definitely the right choice for you if you're into skiing variable terrain. It seems like a ski that is ready to conquer it all.

 

I would look at these two reviews:

http://www.skinet.com/skiing/products/gear/elan-amphibio-14-fusion-2014

http://www.skinet.com/ski/gear/elan-amphibio-78-ti-fusion-2014

 

I would say that the 78ti is probably more what you're looking for, being a little wider underfoot it just gives off that vibe of "I can ski everything proficiently" and falls just under the mid-fat/all-mountain range that starts around 80, so it has a tendency toward ice and hardpack. If you're looking at that series, I recommend the 78, but either would probably perform well.

post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 

The funny thing is Elan recommends a 176 for the 78ti, while they recommend a 168 for the 14 and the 76. I skied on 168's for all of them, I think I skied on a 177 and thought it was a little harder to control, though it wasn't an elan.

post #6 of 13

I'm similar in physical size to you, a little taller and weigh a little less, but generally the same category and I don't like skis that are taller than me. I would expect the 176s to be a bit much ski, but that may not be the case given that you consider yourself an expert skier and would take a bit longer in a ski.

 

I vote that if it feels good then don't try to change it up too much - it felt good and go with it.

post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 

As my price point is limited and so are my options, I am wondering about something like the Rossignol  Experience 88: http://www.rossignol.com/US/US/experience-88_RACEH02_product_alpine-men-skis.html

 

I am thinking that I like the rocker/camber combination of the amphibio, I am wondering if this would be similar or even better for what I want. It seems like it is hard to find the perfect ski that is good on ice, blasts through crud, can do the moguls, w/o worrying about bending the ski. I am not a speed skier, so I don't know if I would take full advantage of a stiffer ski. I might go back to the demo center and try a few more skis, as they have this one in stock. It is also in the price range that I am looking for. I really don't want to spend more than $500.

 

The good news, the more I look into things and try things, I get a better idea of what I wan't, even if the cost is time and money for demos.

 

-Solarity

post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 

I looked back at one of the skis I the K2 Amp 80XTI. I tried the 170cm and thought it was a little hard to maneuver compared to the other 168cm I tried out. It has 30% rocker/70% camber similar to the Rossignol Experience 88. There was one other ski I tried and hated, felt like crud kept catching the ski. I hope it wasn't the Exp 88, though I will have to find where I placed the info.

 

Exp 88

30/70

135-88-124

 

Amp 80XTI

30/70

125-80-109

 

Now that I look at it, is the higher the width under your feet, does that mean it will be harder to turn for things like ice? There has to be a way to mathematically formulate what ski you is best for you, based off the side cut, length, core construction, and camber/rocker.

 

I think I liked the Amphibio as it turned great, blasted though crud, and had no issues meeting the speeds that I wanted. It felt like an easier to ski to ski with. Though if I like moguls, should I avoid the metal construction as I was told it can bend in moguls, while softer skis will only flex.

post #9 of 13

I was actually just reading a thread on hear about metal skis and bump skiing. I don't remember what it's titled and don't have the link, but I basically just typed metal skis bending in moguls and the topic came up rather fast. To paraphrase, the titanal that is used in modern skis is a better metal and is often applied so thinly that it doesn't bend in moguls. So, I wouldn't worry about that (as long as you trust what people say on this forum, that is)!

 

Generally how I understand it is that the wider the ski, the harder it is to turn overall, but stuff like edge sharpness and angle affect ability to hold on ice. Also a wider ski with a generous sidecut may have a shorter turning radius than a smaller ski and thus feel like it is suited more to groomers or the like.

 

On a related note, I demoed some Blizzard Magnum 8.0ti skis today in 172cm and I have to say that they felt really great. They're a bit more expensive than your price range, I think, but it may be useful to see if you could get a demo model or some nice sale coming up soon. Cut through all kinds of skied out crud today, handled well in the bumps (I don't ski bumps well, so by that I mean it responded to what I was telling it to do, it probably looked like it was skiing bumps poorly, but that's me and not the ski), and felt really REALLY good going down some of my favorite groomed trails. Damp feeling and no chatter or shake whatsoever. Transitioned smoothly and just asked to be pushed into higher gear. I was very pleased with it and enjoyed the combination of rocker and camber it provided.

post #10 of 13

It sounds like you and I are in a similar situation (similar size, out of skiing for a while, similar terrain in Midwest/East after experience in Utah). I purchased the Waveflex 14 (168 cm) a couple of weeks ago at the same price ($500). Check out this thread if you haven't already seen it:

 

Elan Skis for Epic Ski Members

 

I had done quite a bit of research before deciding upon the Waveflex 14s, and I think I would have been happy with some of the other contenders from my list. I wanted an all-mountain ski with a slightly thinner waist mainly because I know most of my skiing will be done on piste or packed snow. Steep and fast are my personal preferences, but I'll also be spending a fair amount of time skiing with my young daughter. Here were my other top contenders:

 

Atomic Nomad Blackeye Ti (2014!): 167 cm, 81 mm waist
with Atomic XTO 12 bindings
Full wood core, metal reinforcement
Skis.com Reviews: Responsive with fast turns, frontsider

 

Head Rev 85 Pro (2014): 170 cm, 85 mm waist
with Head PRD 12 bindings (Don't get Mojo bindings on '13 models)
Wood core
Short turn radius, Ski Mag Gold Medal, Great all-around

 

K2 Rictor 82 XTI: 170 cm, 82 mm waist
with Marker MXC 12 Bindings
Wood core with metal laminate
On-the-Snow Editors' Choice for frontside skis

 

K2 A.M.P. Charger: 172 cm, 74 mm waist
with Marker MX 12.0 bindings
Wood core with metal laminate
Great frontside speed, short-med. turns, 2013 over previous models

 

Rossignol Pursuit HP: 170 cm, 81 mm waist
with Axial 2 140 Ti Bindings
Wood/Titanium core
Super front-side ski, great at speed, SkiMag Gold

 

Salomon Enduro XT 850: 170 cm, 84 mm waist
with Salomon Z 12 Bindings 2014
Full wood core
Ski Magazine "perennial tester favorite"

 

I can't say which of these will be available, but I'd say there are some deals to be had. It sounds like the Waveflex 14 is your first choice though so don't give up hope yet. Best of luck on your search!

post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
Where did you pick up a 14 for $500, they are all sold out here frown.gif

They do have a 76 for $499 and a 12 for $600.

As they price match, I can get the 76 for $420 and the 12 for $580. From what I understand the 12 is identical to the 14, with 1 less strip of titanium, making it more flexable. Thinking it might be better on bumps.
post #12 of 13

I contacted the original poster on that Elan Skis thread. Don't know if he still has any available--but he's a square individual, I can vouch for that.

 

Yes, you might be happier with the 12s on moguls. I don't have experience with either one of them on the bumps (yet). It may take some time and work to find any more 14s in 168 cm, so a lot of it will probably depend on your own preferences and how quickly you want to get them.

post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks, I sent him a pm. I am really looking to buy an Amphibio as that is what I like the best and you can only demo so many skis. Before demo fees cost more than skis.
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