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New skier advice on used skis [Chicago]

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hi, I'm new to skiing and I have been on 1 outing where I rented skis and boots and I had a painful time with the boots.  I have decided to try to give it another try with better equipment.  I bought a pair of boots that didn't hurt my feet and now I'm in the process of trying to find some used skis.  I have looked on craigslist for skis and I purchased what I thought were good skis.  The ski shop though refused to fit my boots to the skis due to some indemnity list.  Well, I now know more about that.  The seller didn't seem to think selling the skis were any problem.  Anyway, learned that.  I have spotted another set of skis on craigslist called dynastar twisters.  I'm assuming these are older than the ones that come up on google.  I asked the seller to email me close up pictures of the bindings so that I could show them to the local ski shop to see if they will work on them at all.  The ski shop person told me he couldn't even look at the pictures.  At this point I gave up ever going to this ski shop ever again.  Snowbird Ski Shop in case anyone is wondering.  So I have 2 questions,

 

Does anyone know if dynastar skis are ok enough for beginners, ie 2nd bunny hill trip?  2, Will ANY ski shop fit my boots to these bindings?  I'll attempt to attach pictures to this post.  Thanks for any help.  I'm about 5 ft 6 in 190-200 pounds.  The person selling them on craigslist has notified me that the bindings are still supported.  Since my previous bad experience, could someone here corroborate his claim?  Will the ski shops wax and or sharpen these skis?

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #2 of 11
I believe the S912's are still indemnified. I am posting from mobile and cannot easily find the link, but if you Google 2014 binding indemnification list you can see for yourself. The binding is a Salomon S912.

FYI, these binding are probably nearing the end of their indemnified life. This does not mean they are unsafe to ski, but in a few years, as you saw, shops may refuse to tech them.

What bindings do your first pair of skis have? If you are reasonably handy and the bindings do not require a remount to fit your bnoots, you can probably get information here on how to set them yourself. The process us generally not difficult, but needs to be done correctly to release correctly.
post #3 of 11

^^ What he said.  |The S912 is fine.  I might use the other binding and set it up myself, depending on what it was and what shape it was in.

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the help for those who replied.  It looks like the seller decided I was taking to long.  Probably didn't help that the idiot at the ski shop was no help.  Very quick to say no after you bring your skis in though.  If all ski shops are like this, I don't believe I will buy skis from any ski shop ever.

post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by startrigger View Post
 

Hi, I'm new to skiing and I have been on 1 outing where I rented skis and boots and I had a painful time with the boots.  I have decided to try to give it another try with better equipment.  I bought a pair of boots that didn't hurt my feet and now I'm in the process of trying to find some used skis.  I have looked on craigslist for skis and I purchased what I thought were good skis.  The ski shop though refused to fit my boots to the skis due to some indemnity list.  Well, I now know more about that.  The seller didn't seem to think selling the skis were any problem.  Anyway, learned that.  I have spotted another set of skis on craigslist called dynastar twisters.  I'm assuming these are older than the ones that come up on google.  I asked the seller to email me close up pictures of the bindings so that I could show them to the local ski shop to see if they will work on them at all.  The ski shop person told me he couldn't even look at the pictures.  At this point I gave up ever going to this ski shop ever again.  Snowbird Ski Shop in case anyone is wondering.  So I have 2 questions,

 

Does anyone know if dynastar skis are ok enough for beginners, ie 2nd bunny hill trip?  2, Will ANY ski shop fit my boots to these bindings?  I'll attempt to attach pictures to this post.  Thanks for any help.  I'm about 5 ft 6 in 190-200 pounds.  The person selling them on craigslist has notified me that the bindings are still supported.  Since my previous bad experience, could someone here corroborate his claim?  Will the ski shops wax and or sharpen these skis?

 

[snipped pics]

So are you in SLC?  There is a good consignment shop.  Something like Second Tracks.

 

Probably better to stick with used skis that are only 2-3 years old.  Then you are more likely to be able to sell them when you are ready to get something better or different when you know more about skiing.  Wax and tuning old skis is not an issue for a ski shop.  As you already know, it's older bindings that can be a problem.  As a beginner, I suggest you pay a ski tech make any adjustments to bindings.  Safety first.

 

Where did you buy the boots?

 

Have you checked out the EpicSki Articles about buying gear?

post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by startrigger View Post
 

Thanks for the help for those who replied.  It looks like the seller decided I was taking to long.  Probably didn't help that the idiot at the ski shop was no help.  Very quick to say no after you bring your skis in though.  If all ski shops are like this, I don't believe I will buy skis from any ski shop ever.

It's fair to say that not all ski shops are the same, nor are all ski techs the same.  No different than buying anything else.

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

So are you in SLC?  There is a good consignment shop.  Something like Second Tracks.

 

Probably better to stick with used skis that are only 2-3 years old.  Then you are more likely to be able to sell them when you are ready to get something better or different when you know more about skiing.  Wax and tuning old skis is not an issue for a ski shop.  As you already know, it's older bindings that can be a problem.  As a beginner, I suggest you pay a ski tech make any adjustments to bindings.  Safety first.

 

Where did you buy the boots?

 

Have you checked out the EpicSki Articles about buying gear?

I'm trying to buy used but it's more difficult for skis than most of my other outdoor activities.  Motorcycles can be referenced in a blue book and so can my mountain bikes in a way.  I don't know if there is a similar resource for skis but I still have no way of knowing how old skis are, 'no freshness date' to reference.  Anyway thanks for your advice.  I'm still going to try to follow the advice of getting a ski tech to look and fit boots at least until I have a year or 2 of skiing done.  At this rate, it looks like it will be rental equipment for a while.  Most used listings in craigslist don't list age or indemnity status of bindings.  I just learned about indemnity for bindings by the way.  I'm not sure if this is due to dishonesty of if this is a relatively new, this indemnity thing.  I got the boots online from levelninesports and the chat guy was helpful.  The boots I bought were way better than the rental boots.  I did look over the beginner guide and it did specify that boots are probably the biggest thing for beginners and after trying the rental boots I have to agree wholeheartedly.  I'm located in the midwest Chicago suburbs area so the ski shops are not very plentiful.  REI made a mess of my x country skis so I don't really trust them that much either so I have to poke around a bit more.  I guess the buying gear section is my next step, hope they have a good section on what to watch for when buying used.  Thanks for your feedback.

post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

It's fair to say that not all ski shops are the same, nor are all ski techs the same.  No different than buying anything else.


Well, for me, It's a little different.  I haven't encountered anything like an indemnity list before in anything else I have done.  I was especially surprised that the ski shop person wouldn't even look at pictures to tell me if they would even service it, not give me an opinion on it.  I asked straight out, I don't need your opinion on the skis, just tell me if you would or be allowed to work on it.  They guy didn't even want to look at the pictures.  Said something about liability or something.  Never encountered that before with anything else I have bought.  I hope that shop owner is freak of nature and most others will at least say if they are allowed to work on them.

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by startrigger View Post
 


Well, for me, It's a little different.  I haven't encountered anything like an indemnity list before in anything else I have done.  I was especially surprised that the ski shop person wouldn't even look at pictures to tell me if they would even service it, not give me an opinion on it.  I asked straight out, I don't need your opinion on the skis, just tell me if you would or be allowed to work on it.  They guy didn't even want to look at the pictures.  Said something about liability or something.  Never encountered that before with anything else I have bought.  I hope that shop owner is freak of nature and most others will at least say if they are allowed to work on them.

 

Bindings are kind of an odd beast. Basically, binding manufacturers promise to indemnify ski shops from liability for binding injuries. If a ski shop is sued for a binding-related injury, the manufacturer pays for the attorneys and pays any fines/settlements.

 

Most ski shops will not touch a non-indemnified binding. I would love to know why a signed liability waiver is not considered sufficient by the vast majority of shops, but that is the case.

 

It seems odd that a shop would not answer whether or not a binding was on the list. However, they may have been hedging your expectations.

 

A binding being on the list is just step one in passing a binding for use. If a binding fails testing, the shop will still not work on it. Thus, somebody cannot say whether they will work on a binding unless they can test it in person.  This is probably why you ran into the problem in getting your question answered- if the individual thought you were asking whether they would pass a binding, they can't say that from a picture. However, they should have been able to tell you whether the model was indemnified.

post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by startrigger View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

So are you in SLC?  There is a good consignment shop.  Something like Second Tracks.

 

Probably better to stick with used skis that are only 2-3 years old.  Then you are more likely to be able to sell them when you are ready to get something better or different when you know more about skiing.  Wax and tuning old skis is not an issue for a ski shop.  As you already know, it's older bindings that can be a problem.  As a beginner, I suggest you pay a ski tech make any adjustments to bindings.  Safety first.

 

Where did you buy the boots?

 

Have you checked out the EpicSki Articles about buying gear?

I'm trying to buy used but it's more difficult for skis than most of my other outdoor activities.  Motorcycles can be referenced in a blue book and so can my mountain bikes in a way.  I don't know if there is a similar resource for skis but I still have no way of knowing how old skis are, 'no freshness date' to reference.  Anyway thanks for your advice.  I'm still going to try to follow the advice of getting a ski tech to look and fit boots at least until I have a year or 2 of skiing done.  At this rate, it looks like it will be rental equipment for a while.  Most used listings in craigslist don't list age or indemnity status of bindings.  I just learned about indemnity for bindings by the way.  I'm not sure if this is due to dishonesty of if this is a relatively new, this indemnity thing.  I got the boots online from levelninesports and the chat guy was helpful.  The boots I bought were way better than the rental boots.  I did look over the beginner guide and it did specify that boots are probably the biggest thing for beginners and after trying the rental boots I have to agree wholeheartedly.  I'm located in the midwest Chicago suburbs area so the ski shops are not very plentiful.  REI made a mess of my x country skis so I don't really trust them that much either so I have to poke around a bit more.  I guess the buying gear section is my next step, hope they have a good section on what to watch for when buying used.  Thanks for your feedback.

Aah, Chicagoland.  Would you be willing to drive to Glenview?  The Scandinavian Ski Shop at 1621 Waukegan is a very good ski shop.  They do true boot fitting.  Late season sales should be starting soon.  I have relatives who live in Park Ridge.  They ski and have hard to fit feet/legs.  I always stop by and find good stuff when we visit them.

 

Honestly, craigslist in Chicago is not where I would look for used skis.  I've done okay looking on eBay when I knew what model and length I wanted.  My first skis when I got back on the slopes while my daughter was getting started (age 4) were basic skis that had been part of a rental fleet for $100.  Since they had system bindings, that made it easier to be sure that my boots would fit.  I went to a free demo day (NC mountains) after we were clearly going to ski more as she learned more.  That's how I picked the first pair of good skis.  Found a good price during the summer.

post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

Aah, Chicagoland.  Would you be willing to drive to Glenview?  The Scandinavian Ski Shop at 1621 Waukegan is a very good ski shop.  They do true boot fitting.  Late season sales should be starting soon.  I have relatives who live in Park Ridge.  They ski and have hard to fit feet/legs.  I always stop by and find good stuff when we visit them.

 

Honestly, craigslist in Chicago is not where I would look for used skis.  I've done okay looking on eBay when I knew what model and length I wanted.  My first skis when I got back on the slopes while my daughter was getting started (age 4) were basic skis that had been part of a rental fleet for $100.  Since they had system bindings, that made it easier to be sure that my boots would fit.  I went to a free demo day (NC mountains) after we were clearly going to ski more as she learned more.  That's how I picked the first pair of good skis.  Found a good price during the summer.


Heck yeah I'll try that.  Thanks for the tip.  The REI that burned me on x country skis are there so it won't make a difference stopping by there for the place you mentioned.  I hope they work on cross country skis also.  Thanks.

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