or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Why does skiing culture suck so bad
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Why does skiing culture suck so bad - Page 4

post #91 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by SVmike View Post
 

I have immersed myself from a very young age in "the ski culture" and would not have it any other way. First job at 13 was scraping skis at the local ski shop. Taught for 6 seasons (psia 2) now coach the freeride program at the local mountain and count my blessings that my "real job" still lets me play with skis and boots year round. The ski culture is not to blame, Dick heads are to blame! You can find them everywhere. The Coffee snob at your local Starbucks, your douch bag car guy that know everything and loves to prove it and of course the "ski pro" weighing down the bar at the end of the day. There are dicks everywhere. My goal in life.... Don't be a dick!    

 

Yup.  Excellent plan.

post #92 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

 

 

Hehe thanks for the kind words.

 

I have  15 year old CRV with 280,000 miles on it.

 

and I own

 

Kastle MX83s

Blizzard Brahmas

Nordica Soul Rider

Nordica Patron

Rossi Sickles

PM Gear Super Bros

Rossi Gs skis

Blizzard Cochise

Blizzard "the one"

 

not to mention my bikes

 

I literally do have nicer skis than my car.

 

I do eat well though thanks to my food obsessed and farmer GF. It has been said my quads are powered by bacon.

Exactly. I do know some people who just have more money than they know what to do with so they buy the latest skis (or electronics, cars, bikes, what-have-you) just to show off or just because they can or whatever, but there are also cases where it's a matter of what you prioritize. In 1994 I shared an 8 x 40 trailer in Durango with 3 other guys, worked part-time as a fry cook and didn't own a car (thumbed a ride to the mountain every day). But even then I had 5 pairs of skis.

post #93 of 101

Inexperienced instructors with a small "bag of tricks" try to get the student to conform to what they know because that is all they have.  The more one teaches, the larger the bag of tricks becomes.  When we see that something is not connecting with our student, we don't keep flogging, we change our focus and come from a different tack.  We want the student to succeed, and we want to find what works.  When you win, we win. 

 

The on hill relationship with you is different from this abstracted, somewhat distant relating that goes with an online forum.  Online forums can be a bit anarchistic.  Topically, it's often hard to keep the horse in the corral and not running hither and thither.  Too often, the original topics get lost or diluted in the process.  And yes, some who contribute to the discussion have their own agenda. 

 

I think that it is part of our responsibility is to create an atmosphere of comfort and ease that is conducive to your learning. Clarity, simplicity, patience, and even humor are part of what makes a good teacher.   I would also say that any good teacher is a lifetime learner who never stops getting better at what they do.  And they would not make that effort if they did not care about their craft and care about you as a student. 

 

PetewJE, take a lesson.  Chat with a few instructors at lineup and see if you can find someone you might feel a compatibility with.  It might surprise you how enjoyable it can be.

 

Surfdog

post #94 of 101

I don't blame the OP.  Skiing is very technical, which creates a barrier to entry for a beginner, teaching is even more technical and academic, which must be even more daunting for someone who's not an expert and fluent in the language of skiing technique, and then there's the whole internet thing, which just accelerates technical discussions into sometimes ridiculous territory.  (I love these sometimes, but I sympathize with the person who has who's looking for some straightforward info and gets a complicated answer).  Add on to that, how experts; the ones that have the capability of being ambassadors to the sport aren't always excited about going out with a beginner (I'm to blame), and then the fact that for some reason that skiing seems to have a disproportionate amount of jerks (also some of the nicest people ever, but the jerk factor is seemingly high for some reason).

 

If I was new to the sport and was looking for a few pointers and instead got a bunch of highly technical answers that stemmed into arguments about what's the right way and who has more credentials, I'd be turned off as well.  I'm not so sure that's what happened, but it wouldn't surprise me if it did since that does happen and I've had it happen to me in other areas that I'm not so knowledgeable about.  It can be hard to give a simple answer sometimes.  I'm an engineer and catch other engineers giving unnecessarily complicated answers to simple questions, but it's easy to do; I do it myself.

 

The technical discussions can be quite academic and irrelevent for all but a small subset of skiers.  I love skiing and enjoy trying to improve my technique, but my brain shuts off when I try to read the technique discussions.  Thankfully I don't feel the need to wade into those areas because I have enough skills to enjoy the whole mountain and know I can always take a lesson.  If I was a beginner trying to improve so that I could ski more of the mountain, I'd probably be tempted by the technique forums.

 

Lastly, I have to believe that a forum of passionate experts would be a turnoff for someone who's more casual but trying to get into the sport.  There can be a lot of elitism with regards to where you ski (ie, I'd never ski at deer valley, that's for rich people that don't know better), what kind of skis (ie, I only buy custom boutique brands, I wouldn't buy K2s), how you ski (I can't believe that guy is on a black diamond and he can't even carve a turn), etc.

post #95 of 101

It has nothing to do with skiing and everything to do with the internet.

post #96 of 101

As someone who only got into skiing within the last year, I noticed that most people are friendly to noobies, wanting the sport to grow and knowing that the barrier of entry is higher than most sports.  That said, I did note quite a few hypocrisies that made the learning process seem less friendly at times.

 

- On the one hand, skiiers passingly mention how trail ratings can be so different from resort to resort, and kind of blow it off.

- On the other hand, they complain about skiiers being on trails that are too difficult for them, without considering that that is the nature of trail ratings that vary so wildly.  Heck, my wife was comfortable on some blue trails at big out west resorts but found herself in over her head on a green at Sun Valley.

 

- On the one hand, skiiers recommend learning how to side slip as a necessary tool for a beginner/intermediate skiier.

- On the other hand, skiiers constantly bemoan and belittle skiiers/boarders that they see side slipping for ruining their precious snow, when the alternative is that person feeling pressured to go down straight and getting out of control and really hurting someone.

 

- On the one hand, going across the slope or even uphill a little is an often taught way of controlling speed for people that are too new to get going really fast.

- On the other hand, it seems like every 5 days I hear people on a lift complaining about coming across a skiier who was traversing across the slope and not going straight down enough.  I remember on my 4th or 5th day ever skiing, I had just completed a lesson where completing turns far across the fall line to control speed instead of wedging was a key component, and I was feeling really confident on my runs doing so.  Then I got on a lift with some people that were complaining to each other about people doing exactly that, while I just kind of sat their quietly.  My next run I felt very uneasy about doing it and ended up getting way more out of control than I should have.

post #97 of 101
Yep.
post #98 of 101

I haven't been here long but I haven't seen the ego's here that I've seen on other internet forums. Everyone that I've talked to here has been very helpful. As far as instructors on the slopes I can honestly say that my kids have enjoyed and learned a lot from every instructor they've had. Maybe I just got lucky. I haven't had a lesson myself in quite a few years but I can't imagine not learning something for what they charge. Sometimes it has more to do with the student than the instructor.

post #99 of 101

Hi Vcize, 

 

Good on you for persisting. We've all been in your shoes at some point. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Vcize View Post
 

As someone who only got into skiing within the last year, I noticed that most people are friendly to noobies, wanting the sport to grow and knowing that the barrier of entry is higher than most sports.  That said, I did note quite a few hypocrisies that made the learning process seem less friendly at times.

 

- On the one hand, skiiers recommend learning how to side slip as a necessary tool for a beginner/intermediate skiier.

- On the other hand, skiiers constantly bemoan and belittle skiiers/boarders that they see side slipping for ruining their precious snow, when the alternative is that person feeling pressured to go down straight and getting out of control and really hurting someone.

 

I'm really glad they salt the roads in the winter here! That doesn't mean I want to drive beside or even usually behind the salt truck. ;)

 

You're clearly entitled to sideslip even if you're cutting up the run for everyone else. You paid just as much to have a brutal time sideslipping as everyone else did to rejoice in untracked powder. If sideslipping is the only way for you to get down a run safely, please sideslip! 

 

Quote:
 - On the one hand, skiiers passingly mention how trail ratings can be so different from resort to resort, and kind of blow it off.

- On the other hand, they complain about skiiers being on trails that are too difficult for them, without considering that that is the nature of trail ratings that vary so wildly.  Heck, my wife was comfortable on some blue trails at big out west resorts but found herself in over her head on a green at Sun Valley.

 

I have sympathy for people who get themselves stuck on a trail that's beyond their skill. I cringe when I see the same person endangering themselves and others all day on a run though. And when they do have a fall and ask for help, I will help them and suggest where they can find another more appropriate run, and tell them to check out our club for lessons. 

 

Quote:
- On the one hand, going across the slope or even uphill a little is an often taught way of controlling speed for people that are too new to get going really fast.

- On the other hand, it seems like every 5 days I hear people on a lift complaining about coming across a skiier who was traversing across the slope and not going straight down enough.  I remember on my 4th or 5th day ever skiing, I had just completed a lesson where completing turns far across the fall line to control speed instead of wedging was a key component, and I was feeling really confident on my runs doing so.  Then I got on a lift with some people that were complaining to each other about people doing exactly that, while I just kind of sat their quietly.  My next run I felt very uneasy about doing it and ended up getting way more out of control than I should have.

 

Turning uphill is a great way to manage your speed. However, there's minimal benefit to zig-zagging across the entire width of the run; all you're doing is prolonging the inevitable (you're going to have to turn at some point!). Those people above you are also more liable to ski into you. Not saying they're not liable if something happens, but why put yourself in a situation where you can get run into? 

post #100 of 101

This thread reminds me of a conversation from a year or two ago.  I'm sitting on a lift at Heavenly on a powder day and as we're going up this old guy is just bitching about these people below skiing in the backseat who he says are way in over their head, like he's personally insulted about it.  He kept going on and on to the point that I finally said, "What the f*** do you care what they do?  They seem to be having fun."

 

Him: "I've been a ski instructor for 30 years so it offends me."

 

Me: "If people having fun on the snow offends you, you must be a shitty instructor."

 

The rest of the ride was dead quiet.  Two other people I didn't know who were on the ride were smirking, though.

post #101 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by shmerham View Post
 

 Add on to that, how experts; the ones that have the capability of being ambassadors to the sport aren't always excited about going out with a beginner (I'm to blame), and then the fact that for some reason that skiing seems to have a disproportionate amount of jerks (also some of the nicest people ever, but the jerk factor is seemingly high for some reason).

 

I won't say anything directly at that, but beginners are where the fun and excitement are.  I've taught plenty of first timers and also people who've had a couple of group lessons and basically didn't learn much and it can be hard to learn in group of 10-12 people.  If an instructor is not enthusiastic about teaching a first or second or third timer, it will show and the student will react accordingly.  And when a student encounters the instructor who acts like what he'she is doing is beneath them, they need to complain to the ski school director.  I've only ever seen one instructor who acted like he was too good to teach beginners, and he was a level 1, but thought he was pretty hot stuff just because he was an instructor.  His only actual interest was hitting on his attractive female students.  He's gone, too many complaints from students who were ignored.  My most cherished experiences as an instructor have been with people, adults and kids who were beginners.  There is nothing better than literally watching the "light-bulb" moment when it clicks for them and they execute whatever they have been trying to do.

 

As far as the jerks are concerned, I don't know where you ski, but that is certainly not the case around here, except for the odd out-of-stater driving the Cadillac Escalade who thinks he owns every place he visits, but those are pretty rare.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Why does skiing culture suck so bad