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Boot Recomendation

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hey folks,

 

I'm an advanced intermediate skier :)  I like to go fast and with style, but I don't do tricks, and I'm not the daredevil I was 20 years ago.  I only get to ski once or so a year these days.

 

I'm in the market for new boots.  I have very flat feet.  People have said they're the flattest they've ever seen.  As a result, when I get into most boots, I get extreme pain on my inner ankles where it's right up against the plastic.  I know boot plastic can be remolded, but I have concern about buying a boot that's very uncomfortable, but hoping that they can fix it after I pay for them.  Custom foot bed is an option too.

 

Anyways, I have no issues of getting models that are 2 or 3 years old if I can find them for a good price.  I'm hoping to spend under $300, with the knowledge I may one day need a custom liner & footbed.  

 

I tried on some expensive boots in the $450+ range and they all hurt like heck.  Then I tried on Head Edge 7.5 boots.  They felt much better, but I'm concerned that they're too beginner?  Also, the price was $250 for them, but I see online them selling for $115 (although I couldn't find my size - 28/28.5), so I don't know if I'm being ripped off either.  

 

Anyone have any thoughts?  Recommendations?  etc?

 

Thanks!

 

P.S....This is in MA and my skis are Volkl S5's

post #2 of 6

If you're truly an advanced intermediate, then you need a stiffer boot than the Head Edge which is a crazy low 50 flex.  You need at least an 80, and if you skied more I'd recommend something higher.  Your weight is a big factor in choosing the flex, and not knowing that then I can't recommend a certain flex.

 

The Head Edge is a 104mm last meaning it is very wide.  In a perfect world I think you should keep trying boots on until you find one that works.  Knowing this isn't a perfect world, here's another Head boot online at $299 with a slightly narrower 102mm last -- http://www.levelninesports.com/Head-2014-Next-Edge-80-Hf-Ski-Boots

 

As for footbeds and flat feet...I have a high arch, but I find that non-custom footbeds by Sole and other similar manufacturers work great.  I usually buy them at REI for $40-60 and slip those in my ski boots.

 

Basically, try on boots.  Get a true foot measurement (so you know your true mondo size and your width), try on boots, save money and get a good non-custom footbed, and if you really need a pair of boots then order some online and return if they don't fit (yes, shipping starts adding up).

 

Good luck in your search.

 

T. - www.wasatchreport.com

post #3 of 6

In 2011 you were given the name of a competent shop/boot fitter in Canton, The Ski Stop.  Go there and get properly fitted for boots, by someone who can deal with your flat feet.  It is only 20-25 miles from Boston to Canton, so don't say it's too far.  If you insist on buying boots on the interwebs or at some store where they ask for your street shoe size, do not expect sympathy when they don't fit.  We will all laugh and say "we told you so."  If you have problems with your feet, you need to see a boot fitter, period, end of discussion.

post #4 of 6
If you are skiing only once a year. Forget it. Just rent skis and boots when you go skiing. Pay extra for demos. Take a pair of doctor scholls or other gel cushy gooey insoles with you and thick socks and just suffer through with rental boots that you can pad your way through
post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

If you are skiing only once a year. Forget it. Just rent skis and boots. Take s psir of doctor scholls or gooey insoles with you and thick socks and just suffer through with rental boots


Looks like it may be once every two years.

post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 

In 2011 you were given the name of a competent shop/boot fitter in Canton, The Ski Stop.  Go there and get properly fitted for boots, by someone who can deal with your flat feet.  It is only 20-25 miles from Boston to Canton, so don't say it's too far.  If you insist on buying boots on the interwebs or at some store where they ask for your street shoe size, do not expect sympathy when they don't fit.  We will all laugh and say "we told you so."  If you have problems with your feet, you need to see a boot fitter, period, end of discussion.


While this is already a bit of an "I told you so" response working with a good boot fitter is one of the best ways to get the most enjoyment out of skiing.  One of the misconceptions is that bootfitting service are expensive or not for those that are working on a budget.  A good bootfitter will be able to work with your flat feet and $300 budget, especially this time of year as many shops on the East Coast are seeing the end of the season on the horizon and looking to clear out their stock. 

 

Any suggestions you get on specific boots from the forum should be taken with a grain of salt.  Everybody has different feet and preferences but if you tell a bootfitter your budget, skill level, and foot issues you'll be on your way to more enjoyable skiing.  You'll also save money in the long run by purchasing one set of boots right the first time.

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