or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Bought Shoe Online : Next Steps?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bought Shoe Online : Next Steps?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I completely understand that Ski-shoe is not something you buy online. But on ebay I found an incredible deal, Brand new Dalbello Viper 10 for $125. It was really hard for me to miss since I can sell it without loss after using it for couple of times.

 

I live in Indiana, no bootfitter or a good shop nearby. Only way I am going to get a custom fit boot is in December when I will make an Utah trip and till then I would have spent more than $150 on rentals. 

 

So the shoes arrived. Absolutely amazed by what I got for $125. Shining, with tags, owner's manual and not one scratch anywhere. Brand new as described. 

 

I was concerned about the fit since the shoe is 295 mondo (11.5) and I wear 11.5 casual shoes. My foot measures 290 mm. And I know ski shoe is supposed to be smaller than your casual shoes. And yet, the shoe fits very very snugly. Another size smaller, and I wont be able to slide my foot in. There is no wiggle room inside when I use a thin office socks get slide my foot in smoothly (I cant get in without a sock at all).

 

My only concern is slight pressure points around my ankles. How that can be dealt with? Anyone has any experience with these shoes? Apparently they have some heat molding liner inside I guess. How does that work? Should I waste money at PerfectNorthSlopes loft shot to get it fitted or wait around and go to UT/CO in Dec to get it fitted? 

 

(My long term choice would be selling it, make some money out of it and get a custom fit boot. )

post #2 of 19
Boots should be so snug when you first put your foot in that you think they are WAY TOO TIGHT AND WAY TOO SHORT. Given that your foot (not your shoe size, I am hoping) is 290, these boots are too big. You will know that for sure within ten days. I wore my new boots while I tuned my skis in the fall and could barely stand in them ten minutes before I was desperate to take them off. No pain, exactly, but just crazy tight so that it was making me crazy to get them off. The boots are going to pack out. The real test is how much room is behind your heel when your toe is touching the front of the boot and the liner is pulled out?
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Boots should be so snug when you first put your foot in that you think they are WAY TOO TIGHT AND WAY TOO SHORT. Given that your foot (not your shoe size, I am hoping) is 290, these boots are too big. You will know that for sure within ten days. I wore my new boots while I tuned my skis in the fall and could barely stand in them ten minutes before I was desperate to take them off. No pain, exactly, but just crazy tight so that it was making me crazy to get them off. The boots are going to pack out. The real test is how much room is behind your heel when your toe is touching the front of the boot and the liner is pulled out?

Yeah, my foot measures 290 mm but when I was in Utah at Bazookas (Demo rental), the guy just could not get me into anything smaller than 295. The Ankle Joint was not just going it. Literally me and shop guy struggled 10-15 mins to get myself into "right" shoes and gave up to settle on 295. 

 

At the moment, I dont find any space behind my heels when I tighten up the straps with toes pushed forward. I dont feel the "crazy tight" fit but its not quite comfortable either. Again, I feel my ankle join being squeezed. I guess my legs are a bit different shaped or whatever. 

 

What do you mean by "Liner is pulled out" ?

post #4 of 19
The padding needs to be pulled out to do a shell fit. The inner boot. You should be measuring with only the plastic boot, not the soft interior boot.

And yes, it is possible, although not easy, to pull out the liner. On mine, I shove forward on the back of the liner until the heel starts coming up, then I grab and pull it out. I don't like to do this a lot because I'm sure it causes wear on the liner and I fully expect to use the boots far longer than normal people. But you cannot tell if the boot is sized properly length-wise unless you do this.
post #5 of 19
The ankle issue can be blown out, by the way, but too big can't be shrunk.
post #6 of 19
post #7 of 19

They are not shoes, they are called boots.  Sibhusky already pointed that out but maybe not overt enough.

post #8 of 19
Typically you want to pull the liner out and see how your foot fits in the boot without the liner. If your foot is 290mm and the boot is 295mm then I'd expect the fit to be tight with a liner and you might get a finger behind the heel with the liner out. If you can heat your liners I'd check online and see if you can find a YouTube video showing how.
post #9 of 19

OP, I guess you missed the most important thing we tell everyone, BOOTS are the most important part. You need to find a great boot fitter, some guy in demo rental center is not that guy.

 

Enjoy your $125 boot's.

 

To give you an idea of how important boots are, when my GF, who had only skied a couple of times in rental crap, decided she would make the effort to learn how to ski for me, I took her to my boot fitter, someone I have been using for 20 years. He sepnt 2 hours with just her, fitting her to 3 different boot's that were a close match to her foot shape. She dicided the Atomic hawk 80 was the most comfortable, they were I think, $285. I don't remember nor do I care, she is happy in them and has never complained about any pain from them. She feels she has good performance from the boot, I ask her all the time how much movement she has in the boot and she say's very little, just like I tell her, how my boots feel on my foot.

 

That was 3 years ago, I got her those boot. Oh, she just turned 54 y/o.

post #10 of 19
What to do now? Open an eBay account. Get ready to sell them. If your in a 29 boot, with one caveat, it will be too big. The caveat is for very high volume feet with a high instep (instep, not arch!).
post #11 of 19
Ill give some helpful advice. The boots maybe better than his other option of rentals.

You should just wear them for a couple hours each day around the house. See if they can breakin a bit a home before the sloprs. Do this for a week then reevaluate your options
post #12 of 19
I looked up a quick blurb about your boot. It does say liner ia heat moldable. You can go to an ski shop and they will help do this for you for a fee. Or yOu can look on the Internet for ways to do it at home. Even with the heat molding, you should try to wear at home for some hours over some days before just going to the slopes.
Edited by raytseng - 2/16/14 at 11:38am
post #13 of 19
Honestly boots are a big deal but some of these posts are a little over the top. You should try the boots out for the rest of the season and see how it goes. You can heat mold them at home too. There are videos on how to do that on YouTube. You may want to get a new foot bed since the one in your boot probably isn't good.
post #14 of 19

Do those have thermo fit or intuition liners?  They'll loosen up quite a bit when the liners are heat fitted properly.  They'll be pretty unbearable while still feeling extra tight forever unless you bake the liners.  However, once you do bake the liners the resale value goes down.  Heck, the person that sold them might have already baked them then still didn't like the fit and sold them on eBay as "new", never skied, not a scratch:rolleyes  Even if they did you can bake then again, usually up to two or three times.

 

If they're really too big after baking the liners and packing them out you can add extra insoles to fill volume and tighten them up some.

post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

Do those have thermo fit or intuition liners?  

 

Not Intuition.  Dalbello only uses those in their high end boots and even then they usually give the buyer a choice.  The liners in these boots will not heat mold the way an Intuition does and will pack out much faster.

post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

Do those have thermo fit or intuition liners?  They'll loosen up quite a bit when the liners are heat fitted properly.  They'll be pretty unbearable while still feeling extra tight forever unless you bake the liners.  However, once you do bake the liners the resale value goes down.  Heck, the person that sold them might have already baked them then still didn't like the fit and sold them on eBay as "new", never skied, not a scratch:rolleyes  Even if they did you can bake then again, usually up to two or three times.

 

If they're really too big after baking the liners and packing them out you can add extra insoles to fill volume and tighten them up some.

 

 

Some good info here. I am looking into heat molding stuff myself. 

The only reason I bought them because I can sell them on ebay an year later probably at same or more price. I am sure. 

 

So I think its good idea that these will be lot better than the rental stuff I use anyways. So these boots are like "filler item" for me untill I learn about boots, improve my skill and then go for a properly fitted boot from a known fitter. 

 

Thank you for the info. 

post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Kavathe View Post
 

 

 

Some good info here. I am looking into heat molding stuff myself. 

The only reason I bought them because I can sell them on ebay an year later probably at same or more price. I am sure. 

 

 

You should keep the boots if they end up fitting really well.  You won't find many skiers here willing to sell their really good fitting ski boots.  In fact, most will keep the boots longer than any other piece of gear simply because it is so very difficult and often quite expensive to get a pair of boots dialed in to fit just right.

post #18 of 19
Thread Starter 

Ok, one last question. I am looking at videos on heat molding liner and seems it manageable

 

So before I do that, are my liners heat mold-able?

 

From specs, I understand these are "Trufit Performer Liner". The Dalbello website says "Heat System Ready Construction". So I assume they are heat mold-able. Please correct me if I am wrong.

post #19 of 19

right conclusion, but for wrong reasons.

from evo.com's description.

 

http://www.evo.com/outlet/alpine-ski-boots/dalbello-viper-10.aspx

 

Trufit Custom System - Dalbello's Trufit Custom Fit System is the industry benchmark in custom fit innerboot technology. Trufit innerboots are engineered to fit skiers' feet precisely and comfortably right out of the box. The innerboots may also be custom heat formed using a quick and easy heat molding procedure performed in the ski shop

 

 

The "heatsystem ready" means it's designed  to have electric heaters like hottronic installed and should have little slits for wires to go out, and a place to attach the battery/control pack.  this is not related to the heat molding.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Bought Shoe Online : Next Steps?