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Waxing iron base

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
How would one flatten the base of a waxing iron? I was just reading an ebay listing and one seller of a tuning kit said he'd 'lapped' the base of the iron to get it flat. Just wondering how it's done...
post #2 of 16
I put my cloth iron on a 4x36 belt sander.

A sandpaper on a piece of flat glass works too.
post #3 of 16

Out of curiosity: what happens to a cloth iron that you need to sand it? 

post #4 of 16
It wasn't completely flat out of box, was a bit concave and drag on ski edges.

I plan to upgrade though when I find one that has heavy sole plate and doesn't cost$100.
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post

How would one flatten the base of a waxing iron? I was just reading an ebay listing and one seller of a tuning kit said he'd 'lapped' the base of the iron to get it flat. Just wondering how it's done...


It like the base of a ski does not need to be perfect.  Main thing is no burrs.

This is a common mistake amongst beginning waxers and tuners.  Not only the base edge of the ski should be tuned and deburred prior to waxing, but the iron itself needs to be kept smooth by "tuning".  This means smoothing out the sole plate of the iron with sand paper, diamond stones and maybe some abrasive fiber pad as well.  A ski that has an edge high condition with burrs will burr the iron, so it it important to be sure the ski is properly tuned and deburred prior to waxing with the iron.
 

post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
It's not a big deal, but the base of my Toko T8 is a little cupped. At first I thought Podium messed up the base grind on the Kenjas because I couldn't melt the wax in the middle if I drew the iron down the base, but the true bar says they're flat. Finally I thought duh, how about the iron, and sure enough it's a little off. It's not a big deal; I simple go down one side and then down the other, so all the wax gets melted and ironed in. I doubt I'll bother to flatten it; I just wondered how it's done.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post

It's not a big deal, but the base of my Toko T8 is a little cupped. At first I thought Podium messed up the base grind on the Kenjas because I couldn't melt the wax in the middle if I drew the iron down the base, but the true bar says they're flat. Finally I thought duh, how about the iron, and sure enough it's a little off. It's not a big deal; I simple go down one side and then down the other, so all the wax gets melted and ironed in. I doubt I'll bother to flatten it; I just wondered how it's done.


There is plenty of "meat" there so don't hesitate to lay down some paper and go to town.  Obviously on a flat surface.  I have heard of techs. even slightly rounding the irons for waxing cupped skis.  Scratches won't bother your iron, just no burrs. 

post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 
I've only got 220 grit alum. oxide paper. Should I start with something coarser like 150 grit, or would you go to 80 or 100? I have all kinds of regular garnet sandpaper, but I don't imagine it'll do well with steel.
post #9 of 16

I have one of those Wintersteiger irons with a curved plate, and I've scratched it somehow, though my base edges were deburred.  Obviously I'm not going to sand the plate on a flat surface -- hand sanding?  I suppose. 

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post

I've only got 220 grit alum. oxide paper. Should I start with something coarser like 150 grit, or would you go to 80 or 100? I have all kinds of regular garnet sandpaper, but I don't imagine it'll do well with steel.


Go to town with the 220.

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post

I've only got 220 grit alum. oxide paper. Should I start with something coarser like 150 grit, or would you go to 80 or 100? I have all kinds of regular garnet sandpaper, but I don't imagine it'll do well with steel.

Garnet paper will be fine, the sole plate is aluminum.
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post

I have one of those Wintersteiger irons with a curved plate, and I've scratched it somehow, though my base edges were deburred.  Obviously I'm not going to sand the plate on a flat surface -- hand sanding?  I suppose. 

The base of that iron is flat, it's the sides that are curved. Where exactly is the scratch? If it's on the corner between the base and side and will rub on the ski, just hand sand it. If it won't touch the ski base, don't worry about it.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post




The base of that iron is flat, it's the sides that are curved. Where exactly is the scratch? If it's on the corner between the base and side and will rub on the ski, just hand sand it. If it won't touch the ski base, don't worry about it.

 

 

You're right.  My mistake.

post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
Life can be confusing. ;-) BTW, the Toko is a great iron, really seems to hold on to it's temperature, but I may end up with a Wintersteiger iron anyway. I used them in workshops and like how they pool the wax in front of the iron. I'll wait to see what happens when the T8 is flat. Maybe the wax will seem better distributed and I won't want to switch irons.
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

It wasn't completely flat out of box, was a bit concave and drag on ski edges.

I plan to upgrade though when I find one that has heavy sole plate and doesn't cost$100.

 

Oh, I thought you had to flatten it for ironing clothes for some reason :} 

post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Oh, I thought you had to flatten it for ironing clothes for some reason :} 

Haha, it'll probably work better too. biggrin.gif
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