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Super G Ski Sizing

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

So I am looking to get into SG skiing next year.  However, I thought It might be a good idea to get the skis this year as I am not likely to grow taller, only a little heavier.  ( I am 14 and am 5' 10", 130 lbs.)  If I get them I am planning to free ski on them this year in order to get used to them (obviously safely, on a non crowded day with nice conditions) and then race SG on them next year.  Is this advisable?  If so, what length/turn radius should they be?  I was unable to find a sizing guide for SG skis online, so recommendations from you guys would be great.

 

Thanks,

 

Dan

Starbird

post #2 of 17

To race SG safely  you need a coach. Ask him.

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
I understand that and I will have a USSA coach next year. However, I would like to get the skis this year so I have a feel for them next year.
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

To race SG safely  you need a coach. Ask him.

100% agreed!

Are you with a coach now? What are you currently skiing & racing?
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 

My official season just finished, I am on a middle school team. :P  I will be joining a USSA club hopefully next year.  I am currently racing sl/gs, NASTAR on weekends.  SL is done for the year as the middle school team has just ended, but I will keep doing NASTAR GS for the rest of the ski season.

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 

I should probably mention that I had started another thread at: http://www.epicski.com/t/125550/14-year-old-recreational-racer-who-would-like-to-race-speed-events#post_1691755 and started this one for ski sizing suggestions,  however I am grateful for any advice.

post #7 of 17
There is a lot of season left! Find a coach & discuss if your GS is ready to transition to SG.
post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 

OK, I will see what I can do.

post #9 of 17

My how times have changed.

 

Back in the day you could buy authentic super g racing skis from your local neighbourhood ski shop.  You could even demo them to decide what size to get.  I did. 

 

I think getting a pair and skiing on them is a great idea, so long as you plan on skiing in control. 

However, since you are still gaining weight, the ideal length for you will likely go up with time.  See maybe if you can buy a used one on the cheap. 

 

A race coach should be able to give you better advice on size or he might be one of the safety naughtzis that seem to proliferate these days (only on a closed course, only with proper supervision, blah, blah, blah...) and tell you to wait.  I say, just look at the size range they come in, position your weight on a scale of what weights ski racers come in and match up, or just buy the one that is available for a song if it's close.

 

I have to warn you though, that most places that aren't preped for a race are a lot more dangerous and difficult to ski at SG/DH speeds, even (or especially?) without the requirement of making the gates.

post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your support!  I will consider buying a used pair on ebay or at a ski swap or something.  I am definitely planing on skiing in control.  Safety, for me, is the #1 priority.  (would not like to spend two months in rehab, lol.)  I would not even consider skiing a non-race trail on SG skis without running the trail on my GS or SL skis first to get a feel for the conditions.

Thanks again.  +rep.

 

Dan

Starbird

post #11 of 17

Good on you.  My advice is to go for it, but just ramp it up gradually.

 

You can and should pre-run the trail on SGs, with a lot of braking thrown in in spots.  SGs will ski sideways; it's just more unpleasant on them.   Just make sure you have just skied the trail at a reasonable speed before you let them run, and I don't mean skied a few hours ago, I mean the run before this one.  

 

Never mind rehab; going off into the woods at 60+ mph, 'cause you mistakenly thought you could hold the turn at full speed or manage the compression is a good way to die (imho of course).

post #12 of 17
Starbird. It is not a bad idea to get yourself familiar with the skis as you are thinking. Just catch early morning runs before the hill gets too busy. The reason for discussing with a coach is to check what length you nex for your class if you go ahead. I will check the regs for U16. Absent that I would recommend a 201/33m SG ski. This as the older women's SG ski and is also favored by many masters racers. It is big enough to be a reAl ski but is more user friendly than the men's 210.

I do actually have a 201 atomic available.....smile.gif
post #13 of 17
post #14 of 17

Thanks Sib, saved meg digging it out. To the OP, as I thought 201/33 will work for you under the equipment rules as well
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys.  I shall now proceed to read the USSA rules.

 

You reccomend 201/33?  Thanks, that was the kind of answer I was looking for. :)

post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

Good on you.  My advice is to go for it, but just ramp it up gradually.

 

You can and should pre-run the trail on SGs, with a lot of braking thrown in in spots.  SGs will ski sideways; it's just more unpleasant on them.   Just make sure you have just skied the trail at a reasonable speed before you let them run, and I don't mean skied a few hours ago, I mean the run before this one.  

 

Never mind rehab; going off into the woods at 60+ mph, 'cause you mistakenly thought you could hold the turn at full speed or manage the compression is a good way to die (imho of course).

I totally agree that going 60+ into the woods could kill you.  My friend had a SG at Sugarbush and crashed through the fence at 55 mph, breaking his skis as he went.  He was very lucky to live.  Scary, but I would still like to try SG.

post #17 of 17

I heartily concur with ScotsSkier on the length and radius. It will be a stable ski that will give you an idea of how you'll have to adjust your timing and turn initiations to make turns happen where you want them. Even if you decide on a longer ski for the future, this will be a good one to have for those turny SGs you might run into.

 

Note that when skiing on a ski like this (201cm/33 m r) and at SG speeds, you don't want to ski like your are just doing a fast GS. SG skis require early, subtle edging to let them build up pressure to bend and carve the turn. You want to roll onto your edges smoothly; using abrupt movements at 60 mph can cause disastrous results.

 

There is a lot less active weighting and unweighting in SG transitions and more focus on the timing of edge changes and releases. Most importantly, remember that skidded turn initiation at speed is risky as when your edges do engage, you have a lot of energy to manage and channel in the right direction.

 

Outside focus and outside ski pressure is imperative; don't let yourself get too much on your inside ski, but do let the inside ski get on edge to carve and match the outside ski. A skidding inside ski is a recipe for disaster at speed as it leads to divergent skis and caught edges.

 

Good luck with your ski search and your induction into speed skiing. Be safe, be smart, have fun.

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