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Performances: lateral pressure distribution relationship to twist & tilt

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
I have been pondering this for a while now and would like educated feedback from the crowd. We have each considered board performances in different specific tasks. J-turns, short radius carves, big skidded basics, etc; let's use these as the studies. The specific focus of the data to analyzed is pressure distribition laterally across the board (heel to toe) and tilt. I will consider twist to be the difference in tilt from one end othe board to the other. By the book, pressure distibition includes lateral as well as fore/aft. Tilt is an angle the deck is from flat on the ground on which it rides.
Using a "meta analysis" approach to study comparison do you find that tilt and the lateral component of pressure distribution measure the same thing?
post #2 of 4

Yikes - you almost sound like a skier!

 

:)

 

Technically speaking, changes in lateral pressure can only cause minimal board tilt, but tilt can cause a significant change in lateral pressure. Once the board is tilted, one's ability to change where the pressure is applied laterally across the board becomes limited (consider where the wear marks are on the bottom of the board). But can we change whether or not we are riding on the side edge or bottom edge? Also, the location of the center of mass above a tilted board affects performance. The center of mass can be in different places above a board on edge. Does moving the COM change the pressure of the board when the edge angle is constant? If so, then tilt and lateral pressure are different. If the pressure change from such movement is minimal then they can be treated as equivalent. This is probably why most teaching pros focus only on fore/aft pressure when talking about board performance. But this overlooks the vertical component of pressure caused by flexion and extension. Oh the days when I was told to push the board deeper in the snow!

post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 Does moving the COM change the pressure of the board when the edge angle is constant? If so, then tilt and lateral pressure are different. If the pressure change from such movement is minimal then they can be treated as equivalent. This is probably why most teaching pros focus only on fore/aft pressure when talking about board performance.

 

I think without compensation from various joints, movement of CM will alter tilt. As a result, moving the CM, while compensating to maintain continuous tilt angle would not change the pressure at the specific measured area on the base of the deck.

 

My own teaching is riddled with inconsistency in this area. I too focus on fore/aft as "pressure distribution". Though I define pressure distribution by book standards. I address lateral pressure as tilt (or twist). Yet, according to spec, this is pressure distribution. Are most teaching pros unspoken advocates of a change in "the book"?

post #4 of 4

Change in the book is inevitable. I focus on using what is in the book to find ways to improve performance. I do more of teaching what I've been taught to teach vs teaching what the book says. I'd say most snowboard instructors have not even seen the book.

 

The difference between lateral pressure and tilt on performance is so small that I rarely make a distinction in my teaching. Note that I did not say "never". When students are not getting the board on edge effectively via ankle and knee movements I sometimes resort to telling them to get their weight over the edge as a back door approach to getting the same movements. I also tell some students to push the edge into the snow for increased performance.

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