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FAI Information (Hip injury) - Updated info and surgery results - Page 4

post #91 of 100

No mention of FAI so far. Right now my plan is to delay surgery for as long as possible -- hopefully after my next hell trip In February...

 

Mike

post #92 of 100
Thread Starter 

Well... all sounds good except if continuing to ski/ride/run on it making it worse.  I put mine off and it ended up doing more damage to the socket (ended up delaming it) and to the surrounding muscles/ligaments.  I paid the price for it. I would have a discussion with Dr. about the potential for increasing the damage.  

 

I totally understand though. I put mine off for the same reasons.  

post #93 of 100

Saw the hip specialist today.  I have FAI.  Given that I've been able to rehab and resume my activities, he doesn't believe surgery is warranted.  Yippee!  In fact, he said that unless I was experiencing debilitating limitations that caused me not to be able to do what I want he wouldn't do the surgery.  He claimed that the arthoscopic procedure for this sort of labral tear is only 5 years old and implied that the experience of outcomes was not sufficient to determine the effectiveness of repair as a prophylactic.

 

So, I'll be on snow.  He did suggest that I minimize the amount of time in a wedge...

 

Mike

post #94 of 100
Thread Starter 

Thats great news!  the surgery has been done for a little over 10 years and there are specialists who do many of these using special tool and even special operating tables but if you don't need to repair the labrum GREAT!!!!   You could even repair the labrum and not fix the FAI.  Did you discuss whether or not the FAI will continue to cause more damage?  Not telling you what to do but you may consider getting a second opinion from a FAI specialist. 

 

I will say my hip and leg has never worked better. No pain!  Yeah!   


Edited by Finndog - 10/8/14 at 7:00pm
post #95 of 100

The OS, Dr. Brian White, is one of the recognized hip specialists in the US and one of only two that my ordinary OS would recommend.  The reality is that with the amount of joint narrowing I have from osteoarthritis and my age I'm probably looking at a hip replacement somewhere down the line.  But that may be many years away.  And frankly I do not want to have surgery if I can avoid it, and particularly not if it would take me out for the virtual entire ski season!

 

It's great that you are doing fantastic.  I don't have pain now, just instability in the hip.  I'm working on minimizing that with CoreAlign work.  If you've got the opportunity, I'd recommend trying CoreAlign out -- it's been a revelation to me.  I'm learning quite a bit about my body and the various compensations/imbalances I've got.  It'll be interesting to see what difference it makes in my skiing this season.

 

Mike

post #96 of 100
Thread Starter 

@habacomike   Thanks for the tip!  I will look into it.  Best of luck to you . I know you will put all the work in.  Cheers


Edited by Finndog - 10/9/14 at 5:16pm
post #97 of 100

I just put up a new blog post today about FAI, including some interesting facts from the research about who gets it, and possible biomechanic causes. I thought some of you would find it interesting: http://elsbethvaino.com/2014/10/fai/ 

 

Of particular interest will be the point about it being more prevalent in hockey players than skiers. Although there are extra details on that I didn't include, such as:

- even though it's more common among hockey players than skiers, the rate in skiers was high: 40%! Just less high than the 79% of hockey players. 

- 93% of the midget aged hockey players with asymptomatic hips had labral tears, as did 75% of the skiers at that age. 

 

Crazy stuff! 

 

Elsbeth

post #98 of 100
Thread Starter 

UPDATE: First day of skiing yesterday.  The right leg (surgery leg) felt super stable and strong. I could def' tell the difference. In the past my foot/ankle would rotate out causing heel lift and the boot/ski to move to the outside edge when flexing.  This is completely gone. 

post #99 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
 

UPDATE: First day of skiing yesterday.  The right leg (surgery leg) felt super stable and strong. I could def' tell the difference. In the past my foot/ankle would rotate out causing heel lift and the boot/ski to move to the outside edge when flexing.  This is completely gone. 

 

Awesome!

post #100 of 100

Since this is an FAI thread, I wanted to add a post to note that I wrote a Home Exercises for FAI ebook and just released it yesterday. Sheesh - as I type this I feel an overwhelming need to apologize for being sell-y. I think I need to get over that! Anyhow - it's basically a bunch of "corrective" exercises geared at making sure your hips move as well as possible. Which means the exercises are not just for hips but also some up and down the chain as everything affects everything else. The ebook includes links to instructional videos for each exercise that is included. Oh, and it's prices for Amazon (not on kindle yet but I am working on it), meaning it's only $9.99. It's all here: http://trainingaroundinjuries.com/

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