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Loss of Camber

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

Hi All,

 

So my brother recently told me something that I wasnt sure was correct. He said that after about 90 fulls days skiing a ski will lose pretty much all of its camber.

 

Is this true and something to worry about when buying used skis? Im sure over time they will flatten out but didnt think there was a hard fixed number of days or skiing hours to the lifetime of a ski.

 

Thanks,

Tom

post #2 of 25

I would say there are sooooo many variables to this that there is no way anyone could ever put an exact number on it. 

post #3 of 25

90 days?  Total poppy cock.  You can bend a ski with metal in it.  You can brake a ski.  Most skis don't loose any camber from skiing.  As long as they look equal it will be fine.

post #4 of 25
Ski camber will decrease after a few years of use. Your mileage may differ.
post #5 of 25
My 3 y/o Kendo's with over 90 day's on them have great edge hold, good pop and feel the same as the 2014's I demoed a few weeks back.

They have never been to a shop, I do my own tuning.

When I pick them up and put them together that is not much camber, but who cares they ski great. Not sure the Kendo's had much camber to start with. My old AC40's 150 day's have lots of camber and also ski great. They have been stone ground one time.
post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post

My 3 y/o Kendo's with over 90 day's on them have great edge hold, good pop and feel the same as the 2014's I demoed a few weeks back.

They have never been to a shop, I do my own tuning.

When I pick them up and put them together that is not much camber, but who cares they ski great. Not sure the Kendo's had much camber to start with. My old AC40's 150 day's have lots of camber and also ski great. They have been stone ground one time.

 

I have Kendos I bought in the spring of 2011, with ~100 days on them and they still do the job (although boredom has me in the market for new skis... but that's for another thread!).  I noticed this (that the skis are almost flat against each other) from day 1, so I agree - maybe there wasn't that much camber to lose.

post #7 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by mowmow View Post

Ski camber will decrease after a few years of use. Your mileage may differ.


I have a pair of 15yo Volkl Racetigers that have been skied to death and haven't lost a mm.

I have been careful to not overstress them and that is what matters in composite structures, not hours.

post #8 of 25
It is not just camber that matters. A ski may still retain all it's original camber but still have lost its stiffness and or edge hold and be less effective
post #9 of 25
I've got well north of 100 days, closing in on 200, for my Recons and Outlaws. This is the first year I've started thinking maybe they are tiring. It's amazing how long things last when you are on a fixed income. They still have camber, and plenty of material. Home tuned.
post #10 of 25
If you use a tool it's going to wear out. It might take 100 yrs.
post #11 of 25

Skis absolutely do change with time and use. 

 

Wood is used in lots of skis. Wood warps and stretches under loads and with moisture. My mother's old wood race skis had interesting racks for storage to preserve the rocker and camber. The wood waterskis I used to build all warped to unuseable after a season. Flipcore skis? Those might change a lot.

 

Foam cores get crushed with load. Delaminations with the skins and the cores also happen with loads. Resins can slowly creep over time - especially when heated. Fibers can break under load. Edges wear down. Metal in the skis gets bent. Certainly, skis do age.

 

While these factors do exist, skis are incredibly durable. Most skis grow stale by your impressions rather than any physical issues. Buy new skis because it is fun to ride new stuff. Despite lots of new skis, my favorite skis are still my beat up 6 year old Goodes. 

 

Eric

post #12 of 25

I can't even tell you how many days I have on my 1080 Spaceframe foam core skis.  Hundreds for sure.   They still work fine for me.  BTW, the wood in a ski core is not supposed to get wet!  If it does.....well you have issues!

post #13 of 25
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replies everyone, I kinda thought he was out of his mind but as his older brother its my job to thoroughly prove him wrong! I would image proper storage in the off-season makes a big difference as well. If you store your skis flat with crap piled on them that wouldnt be good. Aside from being stored dry is there any other proper way? Upright or on their side? 

 

Also, on the topic of storage, are you supposed to loosen the bindings to the lowest DIN during storage? Thats what I typically do. 

post #14 of 25

I turn the DIN down and keep them cool.

Plastics don't like heat.

Other opinions may vary.

post #15 of 25

Store in a cool dry place in a ski rack. Like Wine.;-) I use to turn bindings down but not any more. Didn't seem to matter. Besides I'll just buy new ones if it does. I do store them w/ a coat of wax on them every Summer. After a day of skiing I wipe all the moisture off of them before bagging them.

post #16 of 25

Isn't loss of camber a good thing now when everybody raves about how camber is over rated and rocker is a way to go? :duck:

post #17 of 25

I'd say that is largely dependent on the type of ski it is and what you plan on doing with said ski.  If its a groomer ripper ski, you want camber, if its a powder ski, you'll be more interested in it having rocker in the tips.

 

Like I said in my first post on this topic, there are soooooooooooooooooo many variables that determine the life of a ski I don't know how ANYONE could EVER put an exact number on the life of any ski.


Edited by MoJo23 - 2/12/14 at 11:13am
post #18 of 25
Bandit B2's would lose their camber right after you took the wrapper off.
post #19 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cfr View Post
 

Isn't loss of camber a good thing now when everybody raves about how camber is over rated and rocker is a way to go? :duck:

Well my skis have a decent amount of both, haha! 

post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twism86 View Post
 

Well my skis have a decent amount of both, haha! 


Mine too! All of them! Camber under foot and extreme rocker at the tips - the very 2" at the tip. ;)

post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chenzo View Post

Bandit B2's would lose their camber right after you took the wrapper off.


That's funny.  My Bandit XX skis are so old and still killin' it.  They have a ton of rebound!   They are frickin' old!

post #22 of 25
I guess it also depends on how much you beat on them. At a ski swap I saw a pair of atomic double decker GS skis that were completely flat. Don't know how did that happen, but I'm pretty sure they are suppose to have some and double decker skis aren't that old. They were priced something like $400 too.
post #23 of 25
maybe we should start a thread about skis losing their rocker.
post #24 of 25
Perhaps an appropriate thread title would be..Has your Bear lost his/her rocker?
post #25 of 25

It only takes one overstress event to microfracture a composite structure so that it loses its mechanical properties.

Metals bend so the damage to a metal structure is obvious but composites fail in many unobvious ways.

If not overstressed, most composite structures will have a very long life before cracking from high cycle fatigue takes place.

Cal 40 sailboats are approaching 50 yo and the keels aren't falling off.

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