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Big tear in a Gore-tex pro jacket

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hi epicski, 

 

I come here to see if your wisdom can help me. 

 

Two days ago I ripped my new Norrona jacket, gore-tex pro, while skiing the trees. I swore like I had never sworn. 

 

The tear seems pretty big to me. Any ideas of what I could do with it?

 

I was thinking about taking it to the clothing alterations/repair shop, have it stitched, and then waterproof the stitches with aquaseal or gore's seam tape (or both)

 

Any ideas?

 

Thanks in advance!

post #2 of 10

These guys fixed me up pretty good on a bigger tear:  (also skiing trees)

 

 

http://rainypass.com

 

Based on my experience, i think if you call them they may have some good (free) advice

even if you don't send your coat in (my rip was much bigger)

 

good luck

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the Rainy Pass link. I already saw that they are an official gore-tex repair shop, but I was thinking about doing it locally in SLC. 

 

I see an example in their webpage, a similar tear to mine. I'm sure the quality of the repair is top-notch! But looks crappy anyway :)

post #4 of 10

You might try contacting Norrona and see if you can buy a piece of matching fabric for the patch from them.

post #5 of 10

I don't mean to speak out of turn, and probably there's going to be some experts who correct me, but if I understand stuff like Gore-Tex correctly, there's nothing particularly special about the outer- shell layer.  It's just a highly breathable nylon with water repelency ... not actually impermeable, but just dissipates the moisture to air faster than it can soak through the jacket.  If that's right, you can take an isolated spot like this a patch it with whatever nylon you find a your local fabric shop... and it won't compromise the effectiveness of the waterproofing... since you still have the air flow from all the surrounding area of the jacket.  You need to be careful with the stitching, since you can have all kinds of problems when you start piecing nylon with, ahem, that "normal" thread the DW's got stashed in her sewing box.  If you do go to said sewing store, ask them for the correct thread for sewing Gore-Tex. 

 

Also, you definitely wouldn't want to "waterproof" the area when it's done with a silicone spray, etc., since that would kill the air flow properties of the original material.

 

But what do I know.... stuff someone I don't remember explained to me 20+ years ago when Gore-Tex was new and cost 10x what it does now. 

post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdeangel View Post
 

I don't mean to speak out of turn, and probably there's going to be some experts who correct me, but if I understand stuff like Gore-Tex correctly, there's nothing particularly special about the outer- shell layer.  It's just a highly breathable nylon with water repelency ... not actually impermeable, but just dissipates the moisture to air faster than it can soak through the jacket.  If that's right, you can take an isolated spot like this a patch it with whatever nylon you find a your local fabric shop... and it won't compromise the effectiveness of the waterproofing... since you still have the air flow from all the surrounding area of the jacket.  You need to be careful with the stitching, since you can have all kinds of problems when you start piecing nylon with, ahem, that "normal" thread the DW's got stashed in her sewing box.  If you do go to said sewing store, ask them for the correct thread for sewing Gore-Tex. 

 

Also, you definitely wouldn't want to "waterproof" the area when it's done with a silicone spray, etc., since that would kill the air flow properties of the original material.

 

But what do I know.... stuff someone I don't remember explained to me 20+ years ago when Gore-Tex was new and cost 10x what it does now. 

Incorrect.  Gore-Tex is a membrane that is bonded to either 1 or two layers of fabric.  It is extremely thin which is why it has to be bonded to a fabric.  It has thousands of microscopic holes that large enough for vapor molecules to get through but too small for water to get through.  If you sew Gore-Tex and do not seal the seam it will absolutely leak.  All seams in Gore-Tex are either taped or sealed with what amounts to a glue.

post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 

Incorrect.  Gore-Tex is a membrane that is bonded to either 1 or two layers of fabric.  It is extremely thin which is why it has to be bonded to a fabric.  It has thousands of microscopic holes that large enough for vapor molecules to get through but too small for water to get through.  If you sew Gore-Tex and do not seal the seam it will absolutely leak.  All seams in Gore-Tex are either taped or sealed with what amounts to a glue.

This ^^^^. OP: Just seal it up with Gore Tex tape and seam seal. No big deal. Not like the rest of the jacket magically loses its abilities because there's a patch in one place...

post #8 of 10

I'd be inclined to repair with tape rather than by sewing--When I've sewn stuff like that the puckering looks pretty bad. This stuff comes in dark blue and clear, among other colors.

http://www.rei.com/product/783045/gear-aid-tenacious-tape-repair-tape

(Disclaimer--I've never actually used the stuff so I don't know how durable it is)

If you do take it to someone for repair I'd certainly take it to someone who specializes in outdoor gear.

I don't know where you are but these guys are good http://www.tec-tahoe.com/ship_to_us.html  and you can ship

post #9 of 10

Been there done that..a few times.

The pro repairs I can still always tell .And I know someone now that will do them cheap..and really good.

If it got ripped it is gonna show.

 

What I started doing...trim the material really smooth at the edges..use a razor or equivalent.

 

Clear duck tape. This is the stickiest hardest to work with tape. Somehow..get a piece underneath and line up.Obviouslly press the material onto the tape.

 

The last repair I did like this I had to cut the lining to get access to the area. No problem..I just taped that back together too.

 

I ripped a brand new jacket on a door..about a few minutes after I had bought it..

At a ski show..

 

I fixed a really old ready for the garbage heavy canvas hydro parka a few years ago.Washed it and taped it up. lol..I even re-did the seams on the cuffs! It has gone through the washing machine many times too.

 

The clear tape is waay sticker than the regular tape.

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

I'd be inclined to repair with tape rather than by sewing--When I've sewn stuff like that the puckering looks pretty bad. This stuff comes in dark blue and clear, among other colors.

http://www.rei.com/product/783045/gear-aid-tenacious-tape-repair-tape

 

I've used the clear Tenacious Tape on a number of products and it works well. I have some pants I patched up a couple of years back and they're still holding strong, after a couple of washes and a lot of use. If you're able to tape the tear from the inside it will look a lot better.

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