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Which skis should i take (rossignol x-flight 2 oversize or volant machete sin)

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Please help! I dont know much about skiing, forgiveness or spring but A friend has invited me to stay in Nelson BC for a couple of weeks in march and we will be skiing in Whitewater which describes its runs as difficult, more difficult and extreme!

 

I am now the proud owner of one pair of 2004 volant machete sin (175cm) skis (apparently good all mountain but a bit heavy) and a pair of (2007) rossignol x-flight 2 (173) skis (just found them in a local charty shop so i had them since they were cheap, look quite modern and look quite fat/light to me)

 

Which should i take? Whitewater is meant to be all about deep powder but its towards the end of the season.

I'm 180cm, slim (70kg) and was confident skier for during 2 weeks of alpine skiing 20 years ago - I really want the skis best suited to powder conditions. In honesty i'll probably be a floundering mess in all that steep and deep snow whichever skis i take but ive got to try and make a half decent impression!!!

 

Maybe the longer ones are best since more area... i just dont know!!!

 

Thanks

post #2 of 14

I would recommend you rent.

 

You can ski powder and crud and chop on skinny skis just fine (with more effort) but that is only if you have a good grasp on what you are doing.

 

If you are not familiar, these skis will make it tough to pick it up over the course of a trip.

 

Rent some fat skis.

post #3 of 14

Do you have boots that actually fit your feet, that you got from a ski shop that knows how to fit boots?  Did the shop do a shell fit (remove the liner and you put your foot into the empty shell)?  If not, that is what you need before worrying about skis.  If you got some boots that were "comfy" in the store, your boots are probably 2 sizes too big so just rent the widest ski you can find and hope for the best.

post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks for tips... not really want I wanted to hear but as usual i'm trying to do it all on the cheap! Actually I completely cannot afford a ski trip now but it was an offer that couldnt be turned down!

 

I'll find out how good the boots fit when they turn up!

 

I'll take one set for groomed runs and can always hire some fatties for a couple of days if we hit the powder.

 

So i take it the inverse is true for piste skiing - that is i'd be better off with skinnier carvers than short fat powder skis?

 

Would be still interested on thought on which set would be best to take though, any ideas of pros / cons of each?

 

Cheers

post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffree View Post
 

I'll find out how good the boots fit when they turn up!

 

Are these the boots you used 20 years ago?

post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 

No, but they are getting on a bit!

 

They arrived yesterday from fleabay and actually really good fit! (seem secure without compressing feet, and I can feel toe/heel sliding slightly in the boot when bending/straightening up).

 

Just fitted to bindings and set-up release pressure... all seems good to me but i'll get friend to check over before heading out.

post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffree View Post

No, but they are getting on a bit!

They arrived yesterday from fleabay and actually really good fit! (seem secure without compressing feet, and I can feel toe/heel sliding slightly in the boot when bending/straightening up).

Just fitted to bindings and set-up release pressure... all seems good to me but i'll get friend to check over before heading out.

Your used eBay boots are too big.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

Your used eBay boots are too big.

Guaranteed.  Buying used boots, especially on ebay is about the worst thing you can do, unless you just wanted the shell and plan to replace the shot liners.  The liners in those boots are undoubtedly completely packed out which means they will provide little to no insulation.  And if they feel comfortable now that is a sure sign they're too big.  When you actually start skiing in them, you will notice your feet sliding around a lot, so you compensate by buckling them tighter, which combined with the lack of insulation from the liners will make your feet feel like ice cubes in a very short time.

post #9 of 14
Boots too big for sure. If the feet are sliding at home, they will be sliding way more on the hill. Here is the bad news for you- there is nothing you can do to the shell that is too big. Nothing. A rule of thumb is to buy at least a size down from your dress shoe size, and more often than not people end up two sizes down from sneakers size. Does not look like you can afford a proper solution- buying new boots from a good boot fitter ( not many ski shops have those, so choose carefully and do your research), but still do yourself a favor and bring those to a good shop in your area or in Nelson when you get there. Most likely the fitter will tell you what we told you - the boots are a total loss and you have to check them and start over- but fitting boots over the internet never works, so you need to get to see someone who can take a look at that.
post #10 of 14

I didn't have time to write up the full reply earlier, but if you can reposition the foot in any way inside the boot, they are way too big.

 

In a correctly fit boot, you should be able to wiggle your toes. The rest of the foot should be locked in place.  When you flex forward, your heel should not move. When my boots (which are on the comfort/larger side of the fit spectrum) break in, I get enough space at the heel where if I flex forward hard the heel comes up just enough where I can't feel weight on it, which means it may be a few millimeters off the insole or I've just unweighted it enough where I can't feel the insole.

 

Too big of a boot is not just a ski control issue. It commonly brings massive unskiable pain along with it.  In too big of a boot, you will slam your toes around, cram your foot too far forward in the boot causing cramps, Ball up the foot to get more control causing cramps, or develop terrible pain in the ankle muscles that try to stabilize your ankle in a boot that does not give it support.

 

Skiing crappy skis all day just makes you want better skis.

Skiing crappy boots means you cannot ski.  I have yet to meet the person that can ski through cramping on the ball of the foot.

 

This all leads me to ask- what is your end game-goal in all of this? Are you going to be a regular skier or is this just something you are going to do for 2 weeks and hang it up? If you are just skiing for two weeks, rent the equipment. You will have a better time than trying to cobble together suboptimal used stuff.

 

There are places that do longer term/seasonal rentals. They may be a better option than daily rentals for 2 weeks.

 

If you are sure what your skiing intentions are, rent for a few days, see how it goes. If you think you are going to become a skier, visit a shop up there and get into some ski boots.

post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hi all thanks for advice.

 

Its a case of not what is optimal but what is necessary and possible... I'm going to have to make do or not at all. Though i wound up spending more on undies for my host than i did on skis... yes indeed my feet will be attached to my skis though less that half a thong's worth of boot between!

 

Though all might not be lost with the £10 boots... when i say slide it was with tops undone (was following youtube vid on boot fitting). When buckled its more like i can feel a slight transfer of pressure from toe to heal but i'll get them and skis looked at with locally before i go away.

 

Basically it would be good skiing more often because i used to really love it but haven't got round to it for years. I figured its better to buy a set of old gear that can always be reused or sold for food.

 

I'll probably take the volant ones since reviews indicate that they are more versatile ski which are apparently good for: off-groomed, crud-busting, freeride and deep snow.

 

The rossignols seem more orientated towards on-piste and i think were a lower price range ski though they are a few years newer. 

post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffree View Post i wound up spending more on undies for my host than i did on skis...

Wat.

 

This seems to be your problem.

post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffree View Post
 

Hi all thanks for advice.

 

Its a case of not what is optimal but what is necessary and possible... I'm going to have to make do or not at all. Though i wound up spending more on undies for my host than i did on skis... yes indeed my feet will be attached to my skis though less that half a thong's worth of boot between!

 

Though all might not be lost with the £10 boots... when i say slide it was with tops undone (was following youtube vid on boot fitting). When buckled its more like i can feel a slight transfer of pressure from toe to heal but i'll get them and skis looked at with locally before i go away.

 

Basically it would be good skiing more often because i used to really love it but haven't got round to it for years. I figured its better to buy a set of old gear that can always be reused or sold for food.

 

I'll probably take the volant ones since reviews indicate that they are more versatile ski which are apparently good for: off-groomed, crud-busting, freeride and deep snow.

 

The rossignols seem more orientated towards on-piste and i think were a lower price range ski though they are a few years newer. 

Don't even bother bringing those to a boot fitter, spare yourself the embarrassment.  Just rent boots when you get there, but make sure they are at least a proper size.   Even the POS modern rental boots will be skiing way better than your  £10 E-bay boots (they are probably at least 10 years old.  Here is an idea first suggested by one of the boot fitters here: your boots will make a great flower pot for your host:-)  

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post
 

Don't even bother bringing those to a boot fitter, spare yourself the embarrassment.  Just rent boots when you get there, but make sure they are at least a proper size.   Even the POS modern rental boots will be skiing way better than your  £10 E-bay boots (they are probably at least 10 years old.  Here is an idea first suggested by one of the boot fitters here: your boots will make a great flower pot for your host:-) 

^^^^^^^ This.  Don't waste your airline baggage weight on them.

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