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Tips to remain on skis as long as possible. - Page 2

post #31 of 56
Keep it on the ground and no more of that flippy, spiny shit.
post #32 of 56

Its all about attitude.  You want to ski you will!

 

I've got knee/ankle joint misalignment because of a leg break (not skiing), knee problems (growing to fast as a kid), hairline fractures in the back (skiing, doing something crazy).

 

I still charge down the hills, because I love it and will do what it takes so that I can keep doing it.

 

BTW I'm 49.

post #33 of 56

Physical conditioning.

 

Time to start exercising everyday, get a gym membership too.

post #34 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by diesel47 View Post
 

Physical conditioning.

 

Time to start exercising everyday, get a gym membership too.

 

Younger wife probably wouldn't hurt either.

post #35 of 56
First post ever, and I have to say that I am absolutely inspired right now. I turn 40 next month and started skiing this year with the same goal of enjoying it for the rest of my life (or as long as possible) in spite of the late start. I live within an hour drive of 8 amazing resorts and it's been one of my life regrets not knowing how to ski.

Last year I finally committed as our kids started in ski school and I now realize what I've been missing out on.

I love it!!!

A most sincere thank you to all who contribute so much knowledge and wisdom on this site. I've had every conceivable question answered just by searching it extensively in the forums and then learning from the experience and advice of those who already know and do. Now i'm enjoying the application and can see why you are all so passionate about it. I hope to be able to contribute as much to others someday.
post #36 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by birkelb View Post

First post ever, and I have to say that I am absolutely inspired right now. I turn 40 next month and started skiing this year with the same goal of enjoying it for the rest of my life (or as long as possible) in spite of the late start. I live within an hour drive of 8 amazing resorts and it's been one of my life regrets not knowing how to ski.

Last year I finally committed as our kids started in ski school and I now realize what I've been missing out on.

I love it!!!

A most sincere thank you to all who contribute so much knowledge and wisdom on this site. I've had every conceivable question answered just by searching it extensively in the forums and then learning from the experience and advice of those who already know and do. Now i'm enjoying the application and can see why you are all so passionate about it. I hope to be able to contribute as much to others someday.

Welcome to EpicSki!  You have lucky kids. :)  Of course, you are a lucky parent that they inspired you to find out how much fun sliding on snow can be.  I was able to ramp up my ski days after my daughter was old enough to start skiing.  Luckily she liked it since my spouse is a non-skier.  I'm a much better skier at 57 than I was at 55, partially because of better ski conditioning but also because of lessons with very experienced instructors in several places.  Didn't become an advanced skier until after age 50.

 

Have fun!

post #37 of 56
I didn't start to down hill ski until age 35. Cross countried a bit before that. Tried alpine and caught the bug. learned on straight skis and got up to black runs but had to give it up for about 10 years due to children, moving etc and only managed a few days a year if any. Took it up again about 4 years ago with the new shaped skis and took a few camps.

58 this year and I ski moguls, double blacks, chutes powder - not always the most graceful but always trying to work on something or improve in someway - so if the snow in the bowls in crappy, i try to work on short turns on on the groomers or on maintaining edge control on the ice.
I too am a far better skier at 58 than at 40 so you really can improve with age.
This year I am really working on the moguls - want to be able to zip line ;-)
I think every one has given some great tips. When I try to ski gracefully it helps my mind focus and I ski more efficiently with less effort.
post #38 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

Keep it on the ground and no more of that flippy, spiny shit.

Hahaha!

 

The difference between fear and common sense.. You fear the crazy shit you haven't done, common sense tells you when that crazy shit's gotta stop.

post #39 of 56
My mogul heroes at my local hill are now in their 60's and older. They all ski 50-70 days a season and are very active in the off season . It's possible to ski at a very high level later into life but you need to also be very physically active year around.
post #40 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post


The only advice I've got is to give up the idea that being someone else--including who you used to be--must be better than being you. As long as you're trying to be someone you're not, you're going to be miserable. If you see aging as loss, you're going to be unhappy. If aging is just another kind of change, another opportunity to grow, every day becomes terrifically interesting.
Dave, thanks so much for writing this. It's beautiful. Clearly you're a pipsqueak if you don't need glasses yet, snowfight.gif but still, well written.

 

While aging may not always be a loss, I wouldn't go so far as to say it's "growth" ......let's just agree on change!  You're absolutely right about longing to be yourself 20 years ago - it's a no-win situation, leading only to bitterness. And really, unless you need glasses and can't ski more than 2 days in a row without endangering your kidneys with NSAIDS you have yet to truly experience the true challenge of change! 

post #41 of 56

My dad is turning 65 this year and skis better now than he did 20 years ago.

 

There is a solid group of "old guys" at my local hill that rip and race NASTAR and they are all in the mid/ate-70's.  I rip the bumps and crud with a guy who skis 6 days a week and and is 76, although he says he's got to ski with us "young 30 year old guys" since all the old guys just like to stay on the groomers.

post #42 of 56

Am 71 yrs old and ski about 75-85 days a year.  Some answers to your questions.

 

First, obviously as you age keep your weight under control and be active, whether it is walking, hiking, running, biking etc. just stay active.

         Pay attention to your legs of course but also your core strength.

 

Second, I have found that no matter what I do all summer I still need about 8 days on the snow to get into ski shape.  I have hiked straight up hill, ridden on my bike up to 6 centuries a summer and still need that 7-8 days on the snow to get into ski shape.

 

Third, broke my back in 4 places in 1991 and don't jump off anything with any kind of flat landing, avoid washboard roads.  

 

Usually I quit around 2 pm but not always, the snow was better after lunch today and skied till 4.  Ski everything

 

Have mentally accepted I cannot keep up with younger good skiers (Spknmike 29yrs and a truly gifted skier) but don't really let it bother me.  I  just compare myself to my age peers and the guys my age that I used to work with and that thought can bring a big smile to my face.  Over the some 50 yrs I have skied my skiing has certainly changed.  Now I just take pride in skiing the whole mt., powder, moguls, trees etc. and being able to flow down the mt.  I stop more often and gaze north on a clear day and admire the Cabinet Mts and sometimes just give thanks for being out in the element and skiing.

 

It is my opinion that experience skiing can't help but make you a better skier, but 10 days a year won't make you a confident better skier.  I don't take lessons anymore but do pay attention to my technique.  Groomer days I usually spend some time on technique and find that this helps when skiing off piste.25 yrs of racing, 6 yrs on PSIA and many other aspects of skiing keeps me keenly aware and always wanting to ski new places, better powder etc.  One thing you didn't address was an older persons mental attitude.  Below is another aspect that keeps me coming back with a smile.

 

Yesterday I was skiing the trees at Silver Mt. (TE's trees) and saw a skier down, I went and check and she was ok.  the skier was Sara who came up with a group to BC ski on Mullan Mt., and forgot her skins so was skiing Silver instead.  I asked her if she would like to ski with a local and she stated yes and we spent the next two hours skiing off piste and showing her places she would never find on her own.  She was 57yrs old, an author, and a very very good skier.  We had a fun morning and it was always good to meet another dedicated skier and help her out skiing the mt.  

 

Skiing is so much more than technique, for me it is a lifestyle that I cherish and it is nice to be able to share this here on Epic.  rambled a little-but you get the idea, I'm sure.  

 

My Best Always, Pete

post #43 of 56
My first skiing experience was more than 70 years ago. I've been teaching skiing full-time since I was 30. Today will be my 85th day of this season. I've averaged well over 100 since 1970. When I was about 50, I hit a wall of physical performance and figured both that my activity level would be declining and my skiing would never get any better. I was terribly WRONG about both those thoughts.

Longevity as a skier requires becoming efficient on the slopes and conservative in your lifestyle, especially your physical training.

I used to be fairly active physically in the off-season, climbing ladders, carrying heavy loads, etc. I've never been a runner or a gym rat. I always "skied myself into shape" at the start of the season. Three years ago, Vail Resorts initiated a fitness test for its on-snow employees and I finally found a way to be in shape when the slopes opened.

Preparing to be able to step up a 12-inch step 120 times in five minutes has eliminated any leg muscle pain when the season begins.

Doing enough pushups, toe touches, balancing on one foot and situps to meet their requirements helps keep the core in shape.

These are low-impact activities that can keep you ready without causing injury.
post #44 of 56

First, when I first read this thread I thought I'd be one of the old guys (at 45...) but now I'm going to use this as inspiration for the future.  I look forward to many more years.

 

Second, one thing that hasn't come up: sleep. Make sure that you get enough recovery time and consistent sleep. This is well-recognized for serious athletes, but it becomes more important as you get older.

post #45 of 56

I am 67 and retired onboard a sailboat in the Caribbean. My skiing holiday this year takes me to Salt Lake City and I will aim to ski 2 days out of 3. I also am very careful about never getting overtired on the slopes.  I am happy skiing 4 hours a day.

 

As for conditioning I try to swim a little harder using my legs more the month before I go. Generally life on a boat keeps me fairly fit but I am aware that I am getting creaky.

 

Over the years I have met quite a few 70 year olds and the odd 80 year old still skiing. Also a 50 year old with artificial hips and knees..

post #46 of 56
Thread Starter 

A lot of great advice.  Thanks everyone.  The general consensus is that year-round fitness is very important.  I do strive for that, but I'd be lying if I said the ski season wasn't my biggest motivator.  I'm pretty sure my recent injuries are a result of increasing exercise intensity significantly within a few months of my ski trips.  Thus, being in better shape year-round would likely help prevent that to a degree.  Thanks for all the great advice.  I will keep it in mind, even though it may not do much good for my trip in 10 days.  

post #47 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski4eva View Post
 

A lot of great advice.  Thanks everyone.  The general consensus is that year-round fitness is very important.  I do strive for that, but I'd be lying if I said the ski season wasn't my biggest motivator.  I'm pretty sure my recent injuries are a result of increasing exercise intensity significantly within a few months of my ski trips.  Thus, being in better shape year-round would likely help prevent that to a degree.  Thanks for all the great advice.  I will keep it in mind, even though it may not do much good for my trip in 10 days.  

 

If you are a desk jockey and are exercising with intensity (e.g. heavy weights or large number of reps under stress like CrossFit) you need to be extremely careful of your form. Desk sitting ruins your posterior chain muscles (hamstring, glutes) while giving you extremely tight hip flexors. These factors combine to cause poor form in lifts like the deadlift and squat which can then lead to lower back injuries. You need to address these issues through mobility/flexibility work to ensure you have a BALANCED body in terms of strength. Tight muscle groups = asking for injury.

 

I'm a Mon-Fri desk jockey myself, and had an L5/S1 disc hernia a few years ago as a result of lifting heavy with questionable technique. I've managed to rehab to 100% functionality and continue to lift heavy weights, but never compromise form. For what it's worth, I'm 33, ski about 30 days a year including touring and also mountain bike (in addition to the gym 2-3 times a week). I have almost no soreness on the first day of the ski season (skinning is another story, takes a few days to get those legs back) and am skiing as fast as I ever have with 4-5 powder days in a row not being a problem for my physically. Moral of the story: stay fit year-round, 30 is nothing!

post #48 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobQC View Post
 

First, when I first read this thread I thought I'd be one of the old guys (at 45...) but now I'm going to use this as inspiration for the future.  I look forward to many more years.

 

Second, one thing that hasn't come up: sleep. Make sure that you get enough recovery time and consistent sleep. This is well-recognized for serious athletes, but it becomes more important as you get older.

 

 

Forgot this factor.I have really noticed in the last few years that getting the right sleep is very important to how I feel on the slopes the next day.  Good point RobQC Thumbs Up

post #49 of 56

I think to a degree it depends on what you hope to be doing on skies in 30 years, easing down groomed intermediate trails or racing with a desire to win? Also you current level of fitness and desire/commitment to dry land training would be important factors IMO.

 

Strength, power, flexibility and the ability to use all three in a dynamic way are important. Many workouts/training programs miss the boat prepare people for that dynamic ability component. I'd rather flip a tractor tire over down a field than do linear weight movements. Same with MTB vs road training and XC running vs pounding the pavement, prepare your body for situations when thing go wrong. That's when you get hurt, not when things are going well.

 

 

Quote:
 Originally Posted by RobQC View Post
 

First, when I first read this thread I thought I'd be one of the old guys (at 45...) but now I'm going to use this as inspiration for the future.  I look forward to many more years.

 

I'm 56 and just took 20 off from skiing and I'm plan on doing some Masters racing next winter. 60 is the new 40.

post #50 of 56

I turn 54 next week.  I started skiing at 45.  Didn't get hooked until I was 47. Now I ski about 60 days a year and race beer league.  On the weekends I coach kids in a "train to race" type program.  When I'm done with them, I train me.  Needless to say, when I get home, I sleep well.

 

There is another thread here on training for skiing from over the summer.  I posted there and will here that if you are living your life correctly, you don't need to workout so you can ski.  Enjoy a lifestyle that keeps you active all year long and involves everything; head to toe, inside and out.  It is the best thing for you and your skiing.  Eat right and monitor stress (Probably more important than working out).

 

If you are in good shape overall and skiing in good form, injuries should be minimal as should fatigue.  I should throw in some risk management too.  I no longer have a desire for "big air", when I race, it is on my terms, and if I think something isn't safe or I'm not ready for it, I don't do it.  That used to not be the case and I have had my share of injuries.  Now I consider it a victory to be in the pub after a race enjoying a cold one and nothing hurts.  The (older) fastest guys almost always end up "dealing" with something.  New bruise from a gate, cracked ribs, something.  The only thing I have to deal with is whether to get a porter or an ale (I always get the porter).

 

I believe (just my opinion) that people that workout for a particular sport or activity are more prone to injury than folks that have a more rounded out regimen. 

 

Easier said than done.  Trying to find the time to do that is incredibly challenging.  My work is very stressful and eats up a LOT of my time.  It's nothing to work a 12 hour day all week long anymore.  I can't remember the last time I was home for supper during the week.  I have found that little snip-its can go a long way.  Stairs instead of elevator, some times I shovel snow even though I have a snow thrower, walk to a colleagues office instead of sending an email.  Things like that.    I've even started using my oval brushes more than my roto brush when tuning, just to get my heart rate up a little.

 

Ken


Edited by L&AirC - 2/14/14 at 7:48am
post #51 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post
 

……..I posted there and will here that if you are living your life correctly, you don't need to workout so you can ski……. 

 

Ken

 

 

You don't need to be fit to "ski".

 

How a person defines skiing may impact the level of fitness they need.

 

Case in point, I skied for the first time in 20 years this Jan. I could ski just fine and took several runs. I could do nothing more than what I currently do from a fitness perspective and "ski" just fine. With my plans for next season a serious training program is in order until the season begins if I hope to optimize my results.

 

One size does not fit all.

post #52 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Griswald View Post
 

 

 

You don't need to be fit to "ski".

 

How a person defines skiing may impact the level of fitness they need.

 

Case in point, I skied for the first time in 20 years this Jan. I could ski just fine and took several runs. I could do nothing more than what I currently do from a fitness perspective and "ski" just fine. With my plans for next season a serious training program is in order until the season begins if I hope to optimize my results.

 

One size does not fit all.

 

 

You're taking my post out of context.  Yes you need to be fit to ski.  I'm saying that if you are living your life correctly, you don't need to do special workout for skiing because you are already fit.

 

The original post was from a recreational skier that skis a couple times a year and that was what I was answering.

 

If you need to do serious training program so you can ski your program next season (taking for granted you aren't a WC Racer), then you are probably out of shape and need to get in better shape.  Again, you need to get in great shape to do great things and if you train to only ski great, you are missing an opportunity and possibly neglecting other parts of your body.

 

I workout because I want to stay healthy through the ski season.  The best thing for me to do is workout my entire body and not just certain muscles that are used during skiing.  That is the mistake that people make and end up getting injured.

 

Your goal should be total fitness.  The outcome will be the ability to meet the demands of an intense ski program.

post #53 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

 

…..If you need to do serious training program so you can ski your program next season (taking for granted you aren't a WC Racer), then you are probably out of shape and need to get in better shape.  Again, you need to get in great shape to do great things and if you train to only ski great, you are missing an opportunity and possibly neglecting other parts of your body.

 

 

 

Yeah, that's it, I'm out of shape., you must have seen me at the Crossfit box the other day.  ;-)

 

I'll be training my ass off because I want to get the best personal performance I can.

 

Serious training for skiing IS overall body fitness.

post #54 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Griswald View Post
 

 

Yeah, that's it, I'm out of shape., you must have seen me at the Crossfit box the other day.  ;-)

 

I'll be training my ass off because I want to get the best personal performance I can.

 

Serious training for skiing IS overall body fitness.

 

This has been my point all along.  I think we are in total agreement but possibly talking past each other.  Some folks come October say "Ski season is coming.  I better start doing some lunges."  and they only do some lunges for ski season.  What the heck have they been doing (or not doing) for the previous 5 months that make them need to do something so they can ski?

 

My comment about the shape you are or aren't in probably wasn't appropriate and I didn't really mean any offense by it.  It wouldn't be a stretch for me to guess that you are in way better shape than I am.  My schedule has been eating me alive and I'm feeling it.  Work is sucking the life out of me to the point that I'm actually thinking about playing the lottery so I can win it but the math says that won't happen and I have come to enjoy the other benefits that my job brings ($).

 

You are going to be training to be in the best shape you can be so you can deal with the demands of skiing.  Perfect.  All along I've been cautioning against people training (only) to be in the best skiing shape they can be and not the best shape.

post #55 of 56

No offense taken, it's hard because most everyone on the Internet is in killer shape and an awesome/rad skier…….

 

Yeah, we're on the same page. I posted about the limitations of liner weight lifting/training movements. Skiing is a dynamic sport and total body fitness is what you want. I want more of it than I'd need to cruise groomers and [for me] a Crossfit or CF type approach fits the bill. I think it's easy to do a ton of running or bike riding and fool yourself into thinking you're "really fit". Unless you do some serious other training, you're only really fit for running/riding in my experience.

post #56 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Griswald View Post
 

No offense taken, it's hard because most everyone on the Internet is in killer shape and an awesome shape.

 

 

Good, tongue in cheek humor.

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