or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › MA for 14 year old rec racer
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

MA for 14 year old rec racer

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I had a race at Gunstock today.  I finished 17th out of 59.

 

Here is a vid:

 

I would really like to finish top 10, any critical advice is welcome.  I really want to improve.

 

Thanks for your time,

 

Dan

Starbird

post #2 of 18

Dan,

 

You are wide around those gates. Search on "rise line" and get more of your turns done before the gate. Got a coach?

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your reply.

 

Yes,  I have a coach.  I knew I was wide, but you have made me realize just how wide I am taking those gates.

How should I fix this?  Just by starting my turn higher and cutting under  the gates?

 

I will now proceed to search "rise line."

 

Thanks again,

 

Dan

Starbird

post #4 of 18

Most important improvement would be to learn how to keep your weight on the outside ski. Now it seem that you have a lot of weight on your inside ski and it causes you to skid after the gate. If you need skidding to tighten the line it is very important you do it before you pass the gate. Skidding after the gate/fall line is slow. 

post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your advice.  My coach said we are doing drills next practice.  I will ask if we can practice skiing with weight on the downhill/outside ski.

post #6 of 18

You are skiing on your heels, putting you "in the backseat". This causes the skidding of the tails that you are experiencing. During your free skiing and drills, focus on feeling your weight on the balls of your feet and keep your derriere above or in front of your feet. You will probably need to allow your ankles to flex to achieve this hip forward stance. Once you become comfortable skiing in a weight forward position, your coach can begin to teach you how to angulate and carve your turns instead of skidding them. There are other items you need to work on but in my opinion this is step #1.

 

Karl

post #7 of 18
What jamt said - weight on the outside ski. The good news is that there is a lot to improve so you should be able to make the first 10 easily wink.gif

Stop skiing on two skis - use just the outside ski, in free skiing. Ask your coach how to angulate over the outside ski so it carves a turn rather than skid it. Then don't aim at the gate, but start aiming one-two ski lengths above the gate next time you train in a course, see what does to your line at the gate.

Good luck
post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks.

 

I am grateful for your input.  My coach is helping me work on skiing on the outside ski,teaching me to carve better turns, and instructing me on how to pick a better line through the course.

 

Dan

Starbird

post #9 of 18

Relax! this one is sometimes easier said then done. Also many folks don't breath while they are running gates. 

 

Be sure you are breathing not holding your breath. Breathing  helps you to be more loose and relaxed You look stiff. You have to learn to be supple....loose  (supple ankles) but focused...intense at the same time. these 2 attributes of good skiers seem to be at opposite ends of the spectrum, which they are,  but this is true of almost all disciplines , whether it is ski racing, or like me playing tennis or playing trumpet (or any musical instrument).

 

You have to learn to be relaxed but intense and focused at the same time.  Breathe!


Edited by Atomicman - 2/14/14 at 2:37pm
post #10 of 18

All of the above.

It looks like me you are trying to tuck some of the turns like the fast guys do.

That's the next thing you learn after you learn to carve clean turns with 90% of your weight on the outside ski and figure out where the race line is by watching the fast guys.

Then worry about getting low, tuning, wax, structure and a bunch of other stuff

post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
I should also probably add that I can carve a nice turn when I am free skiing, but when I am on a gs course, not so much. My coach says that it is more a rhythm problem then a carving problem. Also, I tend to get backseat when on course. Is it possible that when I am am on course that I am too focused on the gates and not on my skiing and keeping a clean line? Any advice would be great.

Thanks,
Dan
Starbird
Edited by Starbird - 2/14/14 at 3:07pm
post #12 of 18

What The Rusty said above.

Search is your friend.

post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 

I am doing some NASTAR tomorrow so I will try to get another video. 

post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine View Post
 

All of the above.

It looks like me you are trying to tuck some of the turns like the fast guys do.

That's the next thing you learn after you learn to carve clean turns with 90% of your weight on the outside ski and figure out where the race line is by watching the fast guys.

Then worry about getting low, tuning, wax, structure and a bunch of other stuff

 

 

What he said.

 

Race standing up and carve your turns clean.  When you can do that, examine your line and tighten it.  Work on your tuck after that. 

post #15 of 18

Technique: 

Atomicman's suggestions are great. Once you're skiing more loose, and with more movement through your joints (getting long in the joints and then short again) you'll be able to manage your turns better. You could try double pole planting to start making yourself longer in the joints at each turn. But even a regular pole plant can help. 

 

Tactics: 

Notice how you're almost skiing at the gate below you, then abruptly turn to ski at the following gate. This skidding kills your rhythm and speed. Your goal should be to "look ahead" and anticipate turns well in advance. The best way to do this is to always be focused two gates ahead. When you're coming up to a red, you should already be watching the next red gate and thinking about how you'll turn around the next blue to get to it. Then as you come up to the blue, you should be looking at the following blue already and think about how you'll turn around the next red to get to it. So think of skiing blue to blue, and think red to red. 

 

Good luck!

post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks!  That was great advice!

post #17 of 18

A lot of good advice has been offered here.

 

 Get your weight more forward.  You should feel your shins pushing into the front of your boot the whole time.  Pretend there is a silver dollar between your shin and your boot and if you get to the bottom and it hasn't fallen into your boot, you get to keep it.  

 

Work on taking a higher line.  In other words, you want to set up for and start the turn well before you get to the gate.  At the gate you want to be on your way out of the turn already.  If you look at the video, you can see the ruts forming around that gate.  There is a lot of arc left in the tracks after the gate.  The ruts should end at the gate, and the tracks after the gate should be a straight line towards the next turn.  

 

My favorite piece of advice that was offered was to relax.  I remember what it was like when I was racing in high school.  I was unstoppable until I set foot on a race course.  Its easy to focus on the idea that we are racing rather than that we are skiing.  On the race course, you want to do well, but that will put pressure on you and you will focus on pushing yourself rather than focusing on skiing well.  Treat it like its just another run down the mountain.  Often your fastest runs will feel slow because when you are skiing well, and looking ahead, and find your natural rhythm you ski smooth.  When you feel like the gates are coming at you one after the other and you don't have time to set up your turns, its not because you are going really fast, its probably because you are in panic mode and you are skiing defensively.  You want to be skiing offensively.  You want to be aware of what is coming before you get there, and have already processed how you are going to deal with it long before you get there.  You have probably been doing this for years in your free skiing, but now you need to learn to relax on a race course enough to let it happen there too.  

 

Good luck, and remember to have fun with it.  

post #18 of 18

Best thing my coach said to me was stand on your outside ski before the gate and actively stand on it, and when your at the gate get your arms and upper body pointing down the fall line.  That was specific for me but it really helped keep me on my outside ski and not fall inwards which is what is happening with you.  This is assuming you are able to carve it out cleanly out of the gates and be super solid on your outside ski.  Enjoy it as well!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › MA for 14 year old rec racer