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14 year old recreational racer who would like to race speed events

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

Hello all!

 

I am a 14 and a half year old recreational racer who is interested in trying the speed events, especially Super G.  I have three years of race training and racing under my belt as of now.  I race on my eighth grade middle school team, and run a NASTAR course at Gunstock Mtn, NH almost every weekend day.  I am average, I would guess.  At a middle school race I usually get better than 15th place, and for NASTAR, I am a gold division racer.  So I guess my biggest question is,  would Super G be right for me/safe to do?  If so, what equipment would I need? I weigh 129 pounds and I am 5ft 10.5in.  I was unable to find a sizing chart for SG skis.  My longest skis right now are 175 atomic redster GS, 21.5 radius.  I am guessing those would be sketchy on a Super G course, and unusable for any Downhill whatsoever.  Please correct me if I am wrong. Also, are there any programs that I can do recreationally or would I need to join U.S.S.A. to race speed events?   If there is any rec racing/training for speed events I might be able to do it this year, but I really don’t want to pay the late fee for a U.S.S.A. membership. (Joining a club is out of the question; too much of a time commitment, as school comes first for me. I really need to keep those a’s.  However, I probably be able to get a membership next year and go without joining a club.)  Any responses and information would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks for your time,

Dan E

Starbird

 

 

post #2 of 26
There's not an easy answer given your assumption that USSA time commitments will interfere with your academics. You need some good coaching and access to training to make you competent and safe. A USSA club is the best place to find this. Many young athletes manage to balance academics and participation in sports programs. Time management is key, and family support will make both goals attainable.
post #3 of 26

You will probably need to join a USSA program to do speed events.  I'm not sure about where you live, but in NY, school programs don't do any speed events.  When was a J3 coach, our athletes had to do a 2 day speed training camp before they could enter a SG, and even then some of them were not allowed to race if they didn't demonstrate good skills.  Since then, the rules for speed events have changed so that there are fewer certified courses around.

Sorry to be a downer about this, but you really need to go all in if you want to ski speed events.

 

BK

post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for replies.

 

I shall now consider If I could make time for a Club/USSA program.

This year I will remain a rec racer.

 

Thanks,

 

Dan

Starbird

post #5 of 26

Just thought I'd mention that Michaela Shiffrin's parents kept her out of speed events and training, in part to perfect her slalom technique, and in part to protect her from injuries which would keep her out of action for extended periods of time while she was still growing.  Michaela has obviously been working on GS more in the last year, given her podiums this year, and may well expand into speed events in the future to be in a better position for WC overall championships.  

post #6 of 26
Thread Starter 

So, you recommend that I train hard for sl/gs this year, and tackle speed events later (when I turn 17 or 18?.)

Sounds like a good idea. :)

 

Thanks for your input :ski 

 

Dan

Starbird

post #7 of 26
If you want to race the speed events, go for it. It will take some commitment and you will have to join a club and get some coaching.

Several great skiers, including Stenmark, have avoided the speed events. But that's no reason for you to do the same. Do what you find fun, because having fun is the best way to make progress in anything.
post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your encouragement.

 

I will try to find a club that offers speed events next year.

 

Dan

Starbird

post #9 of 26

My daughter did a "speed camp" this weekend with her club. She's younger than you (11) but over here U12 is the age group where kids get introduced to Super-G. Only a couple of races, it's not until U14 when they have Super-G on a regular basis. Besides courses, they practised on high speed jumping and terrain waves (compression). Most kids where on GS skis, but a few on dedicated SG skis. Even though it was a little on the hairy side inmo, it was fine with GS skis right now, but for next season I think they'll need proper speed skis, not only to be competitive but for safety reasons. Didn't time them, but me and other "race parents" estimated speeds of 60+ km/h in the course--35ish+ mph.


Edited by Karlsson - 3/4/14 at 1:26pm
post #10 of 26
Is there a late fee if you're a new member for USSA? I admit it was forever ago, but I know my daughter joined mid season and there was no penalty.

Also, understand that it is expensive for a mountain to run speed events. A huge portion of the hill is closed off. They are not going to do this for casual skiers. Therefore, it'll be a FIS or USSA race, requiring the equivalent license.
post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Is there a late fee if you're a new member for USSA? I admit it was forever ago, but I know my daughter joined mid season and there was no penalty.

Also, understand that it is expensive for a mountain to run speed events. A huge portion of the hill is closed off. They are not going to do this for casual skiers. Therefore, it'll be a FIS or USSA race, requiring the equivalent license.

Or go to jay peak for the citizens downhill......no experience or license required! But I would not necessarily recommend without some speed training before hand from a safety perspective. Most clubs/ programs want newcomers to speed to go through some progressions first before they will let them loose on a full on speed course. Focus on gs for the rest of this season, it gives a good grounding before you go into super g
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post


Or go to jay peak for the citizens downhill......no experience or license required! But I would not necessarily recommend without some speed training before hand from a safety perspective. Most clubs/ programs want newcomers to speed to go through some progressions first before they will let them loose on a full on speed course. Focus on gs for the rest of this season, it gives a good grounding before you go into super g


The Jay Peak Downhill is a fun race, however, speeds of 90+ MPH are often hit off the lower jump (which is a maintenance road crossing). You are allowed to do training runs in the morning, with the race in the afternoon. If you hook up with the right people, the morning training runs are effectively a mini speed camp. It is called a Citizens Downhill, but most of the people attending have USSA Club or Masters speed training under their belts.

post #13 of 26
Also, please understand that those speeds are really dangerous, if you crash it WILL be a BIG deal.
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Also, please understand that those speeds are really dangerous,WHEN you crash it WILL be a BIG deal.

 FIFY ;)

post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Also, please understand that those speeds are really dangerous, if you crash it WILL be a BIG deal.

 


Nothing that extensive surgery and 12 months of rehab can't fix. LOL

post #16 of 26

although to be fair, I actually ran the Jay peak DH as my first ever DH in 2005 as a 50 y/o!   I did do some speed training beforehand though, I ran the Masters Eastern regional SG the day before - as my first ever speed race!.  At jay peak I was clocked at 69mph - on a pair of 195 GS skis!   So, it is doable, but as has been pointed out the downside can be significant!   I did turn up again to do it in 2006, properly equipped with a pair of 210 DH but it was canceled due to weather :(

post #17 of 26
Look for speed camps. Here in Ontario, the provincial ski org organizes different camps to introduce different age groups to speed events. I coached a bunch of U14s at the SuperG speed camp a few weeks back. It was intense fun, not many ended up in hospital... Kidding...however, speed events should be taken seriously.

Here is some of the training - they loved the jumps mostly, rollers, wide open steep runs where you let the skis run etc. at -30Celsius... You need a coach that can take you through careful progressions, if you try by yourself you may end up in trouble...

http://youtu.be/eLMTXBKoh0M

GS skis are a minimum. You should find the rules for whatever organization you want to race with, USSA, FIS, Alpine Canada whatever.

Focus on GS training otherwise, obviously... the wider the set, the better biggrin.gif

Good luck.
post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 

Thank you for all your input.

 

Thank you for mentioning the Jay Peak Citizen's Downhill event.  I am considering it.  However, I do realize that some prior speed training will be required.  I am committed to skiing safely.  (Or as safe as speed skiing can be with any amount of training, lol.)  I fully understand the risks of these events.

 

If I am able to join USSA this year, (If my parents agree to let me) I will find a training camp in my area before attempting speed events.  If not, I will focus on sl/gs for this year, and join USSA next year so that I can safely experience the thrill of speed events at a time in the future.

 

Thanks,

 

Dan

Starbird

post #19 of 26
Thread Starter 

accidentally made another post in the wrong thread :/ sorry

post #20 of 26
Thread Starter 

Sorry to bump a dead thread.  I am going to do the Jay Citizens event this year.  I deem it safe this year as it is going to be in a SG format.  I could not find, however, the entry fee price on the website.  Is it that I am blind, or do you have to finalize your entry when you arrive at J. Peak?  Anyone who has raced this event:  I would be grateful for a reply.

 

Dan

Starbird

post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Starbird View Post
 

Sorry to bump a dead thread.  I am going to do the Jay Citizens event this year.  I deem it safe this year as it is going to be in a SG format.  I could not find, however, the entry fee price on the website.  Is it that I am blind, or do you have to finalize your entry when you arrive at J. Peak?  Anyone who has raced this event:  I would be grateful for a reply.

 

Dan

Starbird


Oh well, looks like the 21st Century liability issues finally caught up with Jay Peak. A SG should still be fun, with top speeds in the 50-60 mph range on that trail. At least they didn't downgrade it to a GS! In the past, you register and pay the morning of the race. Other than the USSA Masters Nationals, which are at Okemo this year, means no open DH events left in the east.

post #22 of 26

OK Found out some more info for you. The new Jay Peak site sucks (too cluttered) in trying to find out info for the race. Go to http://www.jaydownhill.com for all the info.

 

From jaydownhill.com:

 

"This year the event will be split into two parts. A timed SG race followed by Speed Runs, with a speed trap on the fastest section of the hill. The speed runs will be strait (see how fast you can go) runs. There will be two starts. The lower start is at the cat path, about half way down the Haynes trail. The second start will be significantly higher."

 

Race

The race is open to anyone to anyone who wants to see just how fast they can go on a pair of skis.

  • The event takes place on the Haynes trail, Stateside Sat, Mar 01, 2014 - 8:00 am to 8:00 pm.
  • Registration:  8:00 AM in Stateside Day Lodge
  • Training Runs:  9:00 AM
  • Start of Race:  10:30 AM
  • Speed Runs start immediately after the race.
  • Apres Party in Stateside Day Lodge following race completion.  
  • $500 Cash prize to the fastest racer.
  • timed course & speed trap

 

 

So, the timed race will be a SG, You could do this on a long, straight pair of GS skis, but SG skis would be better. The speed runs will no longer be a DH through gates, but a straight shot down Haynes Trail through speed traps at the bottom. You definitely want long, fast DH boards to hit top speed on this. Be prepared to go fast! Haynes has a pretty steep pitch, with no flat sections until you get to the very bottom.

post #23 of 26
Thread Starter 

Ok.  Thanks for the info.

post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Starbird View Post

Ok.  Thanks for the info.

No problem. Have fun if you go to Jay, I can't make it up there this year. Actually, the more I think of it, the straight speed runs down Haynes might actually be more insane than the Downhill. With the DH, you had to make turns, and you were still hitting 80-90 mph. I could see someone, with the right skis and wax, hitting 100+ mph down Haynes in a straight shot from the upper start.
post #25 of 26

Starbird, Did you make it up to Jay, and how did it go? I saw the results of the SG on live timing. Does anyone know what speeds were hit on the speed runs after the SG?

post #26 of 26
Thread Starter 

Never made it to Jay.......  Maybe next year.

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