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Feeling the pinch: yes or no?

Poll Results: Do you try to feel the pinch when you ski?

 
  • 27% (3)
    Yes
  • 72% (8)
    No
  • 0% (0)
    Situationally (please specify)
11 Total Votes  
post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

We've probably all heard "feel the pinch" at some point. 

 

Not this pinch: 

 

 

But the pinch some suggest you should feel when you "angulate": 

 

 

Do you try to feel the pinch? 

 

Do you teach people to try to feel the pinch? 

 

Let's hear about the good, bad and ugly regarding the pinch. 

post #2 of 12

I already made this post, and I voted no.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

 

 

so here is the problem I have with teaching the pinch. to be honest I to use to teach it. I feel like I was very wrong for doing so, and I am willing to admit that now,

 

when your ribs and pelvis are pinching that means you spine is bending. instead of the femur separating from the hip.  the idea of the shoulders moving( or in reality actually just being stable and level) is correct but causing that pinch can actually lead to banking your hips and causing angulation in your spine instead of at femur/hip joint. 

 

In my ideal world the tipping starts from your feet, moves up your leg and stop dead in its tracks at the hip joint. A start is to make sure your tipping/steering movements are actually coming from that joint but in reality IMO at the upper echelon of skiing you need to be able to counteract tipping /rotary forces by actively stabilizing your hips against those forces. For me I think of driving and rising my inside hip. I still concentrate on this while on extremely icey slopes, and the added grip is great. 

 

in tele skiing (which I think you do as well JHcooley) from my understanding there is more spinal rotation/angulation between the hips/shoulders than there should be in alpine skiing. 

 
post #3 of 12

I agree with Josh. Also, if you are angulating properly from the hip the upper body will be subjected to centrifugal forces "pulling" the upper body towards the outside of the turn and you have to resist this with the muscles on the inside. If you want a bend in the spine you can simply relax these muscles. If you ski a day with a lot of CB/hip angulation these muscles will be tired but not because you are pinching on the outside.

post #4 of 12

Questions.... Why couldn't you angulate at the hip without starting tipping at your feet? What is "hip banking"? How is the femur separating from the hip?

post #5 of 12

 

Note the difference in the horizontal angle across Marlies Schild's waist and across her shoulders.  I want to ski as much like this as I can (which isn't much, but as close to this style as I can manage).  Another benefit of stretching the back muscles (the right side of the back in this photo) is that when the turn is released, the stretched muscles will retract and help spring the body across the skis and into the next turn.

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

Questions.... Why couldn't you angulate at the hip without starting tipping at your feet? What is "hip banking"? How is the femur separating from the hip?

Tdk, do you have a copy of 'Ultimate Skiing' ?
post #7 of 12

I voted no because I don't try to feel the pinch, but when I am skiing well, I do feel the pinch. Two different things.

post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post


Tdk, do you have a copy of 'Ultimate Skiing' ?

 

Yes

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

Yes

It's just that (respectfully) many of the questions you're asking are pretty well covered by LeMaster.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

I voted no because I don't try to feel the pinch, but when I am skiing well, I do feel the pinch. Two different things.

When I'm skiing well, I feel the 'stretch' on the high side, not the pinch on the low. More noticeably, the muscles in my lower leg below the knee feel like they've been worked. The glutes and thighs, not so much.
post #11 of 12
I also feel the stretch on the high side. Im also trying to lift that inside hip up.
post #12 of 12

I never found the "feel the pinch" to work for me or my students.  What works for me is feeling the weight (pressure) on the outside ski.  What I have to do to create that includes angulation, but other things as well. 

 

So I tend to focus more on the outcome.

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