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2014 Dalbello Lupo SP (the evolution of krypton?)

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

98 Last

Intuition I.D. Liners (Spiral Wrap)

Two Tongues: 130 flex and 110

Worn 30 days on Line Sir Francis Bacon and Armada Norwalk Skis wiith Marker Griffon and Tyrolia AAAttack bindings.

Terrain: Heli powder to charging the most difficult terrain Revelstoke Mountain has to offer and everything in between.

 

I'll preface by saying I'm not a bootfitter or anything, but there's no info on these boots around so figured I'd try and give some.

 

Before I bought these boots I was going to buy the KR2's. The Lupo is Sean Pettit's pro model and ultimately a KR2 with a few really nice features.  Dalbello made the change to a more upright stance when they released the KR2 from the traditional forward lean boots, which for a lot of people was not a popular move. The Lupo is an elaboration on the upright stance boot and to a growing number of people, including myself now, the upright stance is the future of skiing.

 

The Krypton line has been a very popular line for a long time and the KR2 is considered by many to be as good as it gets for a freeride boot. But what if that boot had more features without sacrificing performance? Enter the Lupo. (which means wolf btw)

 

The big difference between the KR2 and Lupo is the walk mode, so lets talk about it. I was skeptical of anyone's ability to put a "walk mode" on a boot and not compromise performance, but this boot is every bit as powerful as the KR2. It's a burly "walk mode" setup, to the point where it's pretty difficult to close the buckle the first little while. Once activated the walk modes range of travel is only few inches, which has people sneering. Although next year's Lupo's will supposedly be tech friendly, touring is not this boots purpose. I think "relax mode" is more appropriate because that's how I use the rear buckle. Maybe you're hiking around your resort or building a booter.  Maybe you're waiting for a heli or cat. Maybe you're having a few beers with your boots on. Maybe you work at the hill and stand around half the time, all of these things are so much better in "relax mode".

 

The other big difference is the replaceable rubber soles, which I adore. They are grippy on ice, cement, stairs, heli's, rocks...you name it. Plus did i mention they're replaceable? The Lupo fits nice right out of the box from most people i've talked to, assuming you are in the 98mm area. My foot is actually 95, but the the heat molded ID liner and Dynalink heel retention buckle keep my feet right where I want it. There are no pressure points which has never happened for me before.

 

 

I'm not really going to get into on snow performance, they are nearly identicle to how the KR2's perform and there are lots of reviews on those boots. However the rubber soles do have a very slight dampening effect. This is good or bad depending on how you look at it. I used to own the Krypton Cross, which has now evolved into the KR2. The Cross had a great Gel shock absorber under the heel, which didn't make the cut when they changed to the KR2 design. The rubber soles are no gel shock absorbers, but they are quit nice feeling if you're dropping cliffs, pillow lines or do anything where a hard landing might come in to play. The dampening feeling is again, very slight. I only noticed because I tried the KR2 and Lupo on the same day, i don't think most people would even notice. This is a powerful performer.

 

My opinion is, if you could have a ski boot with more features and still be a top performer why wouldn't you?

post #2 of 15

in my opinion the upright stance is not for everyone.  I change the stance of MY Kr2 to the old Krypton and its a vast improvement for my skiing. 

 

i am going to be curious if the Lugs on this thing will allow canting/for and aft adjustment and when they are coming out with tech fittings as well. 

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

in my opinion the upright stance is not for everyone.  I change the stance of MY Kr2 to the old Krypton and its a vast improvement for my skiing. 

 

i am going to be curious if the Lugs on this thing will allow canting/for and aft adjustment and when they are coming out with tech fittings as well. 


I agree it's not for everyone. So many people have been on a forward stance for so long and it works for them, it was definitely an adjustment and required strengthening certain muscles for me. Once I did however I was quite shocked by the results. I think about it like wearing running shoes, we walk upright and stand upright, but when we run we adopt a forward leaning athletic stance. I can see the same principles translating to ski boots in the next few years.

 

Good question on the canting, i'm not very knowledgeable in that area. I know the boot has double canting, but don't know much about it.

post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by PoisonTheWell View Post
 


I agree it's not for everyone. So many people have been on a forward stance for so long and it works for them, it was definitely an adjustment and required strengthening certain muscles for me. Once I did however I was quite shocked by the results. I think about it like wearing running shoes, we walk upright and stand upright, but when we run we adopt a forward leaning athletic stance. I can see the same principles translating to ski boots in the next few years.

 

Good question on the canting, i'm not very knowledgeable in that area. I know the boot has double canting, but don't know much about it.

 

 

I actually mean is is possible ot shim the toe/heel lugs some how. If you can take picture of the boot with to the toe lug off (its replaceable right?) then I can probably figure it out. 

post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by PoisonTheWell View Post
 

 

 

touring is not this boots purpose.

Actually, it is. That's why it has a walk mode and a rubber sole, otherwise, it's a krypton.

 

They're not going to be feathery light like some tech boots, (but still lighter than a lot of alpine boots), but the lupo is a good option for someone who tours, but wants the power of a full-on alpine boot for the descents, and doesn't want to own two pair of boots (me). The more upright cuff could be a deal breaker though, but a good friend who used to ski kryptons, and now skis Lupos tells me it's barely noticeable. FWIW, he's a former pro-bumper, so probably judges performance by similar criteria to my own.

 

Think I'm gonna wait till they start dropping prices in the spring, and then maybe pick up a pair. At least I know my feet are happy in kryptons, so the lupo fit should be more or less a known quantity, VS rolling the dice with the fit of another brand AT boot.

 

Can't say enough good things about the ID (intuition powerwrap) liners for fit, warmth, and weight.

post #6 of 15

Any ideas if the comming Lupo Tech will have a wider last then 98mm?

post #7 of 15
FWIW, the current K2 last is a pretty generous 98 in back. Wouldn't want much more space once the liner packs out. Front's the rub, of course.
post #8 of 15

I have  been skiing the Black Diamond Factor 130s for the past couple years as my alpine boot.  I previously spent 5 years in Krypton Pros, which I liked very much.  I bought the Factors because I wanted a full on alpine boot with a walk mode.  I have a much lighter setup for backcountry skiing. I recently tried on some Lupos.  IMO neither the Factor nor the Lupo are real AT boots, they weigh too much and their flex does not function very well for skinning, although I am sure there are people who lug them around in the backcountry who would disputed that.

 

I have checked out many boots in this category and have found they fall in to two types, those that ski just like an alpine boot but have a lame walk mode (Lupo), and those that have a nice walk mode but not the sweet flex of an alpine boot (Factor).  Almost all of the major alpine boot companies now make a boot with a "walk mode," which is a complete misnomer because in almost all of them it is really just a "stand up straight mode."  The Lupo is a great example.  In the locked mode it is an alpine boot, and when it is unlocked it simply allows the cuff to become more vertical with no change in stiffness going forward, which makes it really lousy for walking  The Factor (and I believe the similar Scarpa model) are based on the traditional AT and tele model with a metal bar on the back of the cuff.  Unlocking allows for a soft and extended range of motion going forward and back, but when locked the flex is inhibited by the metal bar.  My Factors ski pretty well in all conditions, but they do not ski like a Lupo, which as noted skis just like the KR2.

 

I chose the Factors because of the real walk mode, 3 forward lean options, and they slip on and off fairly easily when unlocked.  I ski mostly at an area that has a lot of hike to skiing, including extended sidestepping and skis on the shoulder steep hiking.  The Factors allow me to flip the switch (which is way easier than the Lupo mechanism) and really climb or walk.  I do not need to undo the power strap or top buckle, which means I do not need to mess with the powder cuff on my pants.  This makes for way less hassle and watertight boots climbing in deep snow.  I have a friend who skis and loves his Lupos, but does not bother with the "walk" mode, because it doesn't make much difference.

 

The Lupos are a nice crossover boot that skis very well and has grippy soles, but if you want a boot with a real walk mode there are much better options, although they may not ski quite as well.  If you still need to loosen your power strap and a buckle after unlocking your boots to make them comfortable for walking then what are you really gaining from the walk switch?  I have nothing against the Lupos and may be buying a pair myself, but not all walk modes are created equal, so make sure you know what you are getting.

 

As far as putting tech fittings on the Lupos, if you are so worried about weight that you are using Dynafit bindings, then you probably do not want something as heavy as Lupos for your AT boot.  The interchangeable alpine/AT sole blocks seems like a cool idea, but in my (admittedly limited) experience, the reality is that very few people go back and forth with the same pair of boots.

 

It was not my intent to highjack this review thread, but after trying on the Lupos and seeing how much trouble the salesman was having relocking the massive walk mechanism that provided very little ROM, compared to literally flipping a switch with one finger on my Factors, I started to seriously question its worth.

post #9 of 15

The lupo will be one of the first downhill performance boots that will fit dynafit binding and be made to fit my foot. 

post #10 of 15

Any news on Lupo and tech inserts? Cant find any news aboute it...

post #11 of 15

I have used them 70 days as a ski instructor.

 

The confort and warmth is really great. Superb. The uppright stance, not so mutch. I can hardly make a carving turn on them. I have tried 170 cm soft turistskis, the old dobberman spittfire, volkl speeedwall gs and some GS med race skis. Classic skis with negative camper on hard snow. My conclusion: The Lupo does not work with skis with negative camber. Not for a minute. I tried to put some old nevspaper in the back to get move my hips and stance more forward, and I put some raisers under my heals. That did help some.. But I was not sking good.

 

After over 2 mounth of really bad skiing, I tried the fisher vacum 130 rc. I had it made with 17 degress forward lean.

 

 

The first turn I made on them was like magic. I had never skied THAT good in my hole life. WOW.Wow wow wow. '

 

I'm now looking to sell them. I live in Stockholm, sweden. Send me a PM if you are interested. 

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by bionicon View Post
 

Any ideas if the comming Lupo Tech will have a wider last then 98mm?

I doubt that the Lupo Tech will have a wider last than 98mm. The Lupo is a 98mm lasted model. A wider lasted boot would be a different model. With that said, Dalbello's Contour Four (C4) shell design fits fairly graciously for a 98mm lasted boot. 

 

Dalbello does not market this boot as an "A.T." boot. Sean Petit builds big booters and the "relax mode" allows him to stand up and dig. The release mechanism is designed to be mighty…the guy goes big!

 

The rocker balanced stance is the future. Got me a pair of Il Moro T Comps this season. Uber Psyched!!!! 

post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by thion View Post
 

I have used them 70 days as a ski instructor.

 

The confort and warmth is really great. Superb. The uppright stance, not so mutch. I can hardly make a carving turn on them. I have tried 170 cm soft turistskis, the old dobberman spittfire, volkl speeedwall gs and some GS med race skis. Classic skis with negative camper on hard snow. My conclusion: The Lupo does not work with skis with negative camber. Not for a minute. I tried to put some old nevspaper in the back to get move my hips and stance more forward, and I put some raisers under my heals. That did help some.. But I was not sking good.

 

After over 2 mounth of really bad skiing, I tried the fisher vacum 130 rc. I had it made with 17 degress forward lean.

 

 

The first turn I made on them was like magic. I had never skied THAT good in my hole life. WOW.Wow wow wow. '

 

I'm now looking to sell them. I live in Stockholm, sweden. Send me a PM if you are interested. 

Yeah, I can't imagine a boot with 4 degrees of ramp angle, and 9, 11, or 13 degrees of forward lean to be a capable driver of "classic skis with negative camber". These boots are built with the rockered free ride skis in mind…..not antiquated relics. But don't get me wrong, I love driving a relic every once in a while, but I'll dig out a different boot for that experience. 

post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShopGimp View Post
 

Yeah, I can't imagine a boot with 4 degrees of ramp angle, and 9, 11, or 13 degrees of forward lean to be a capable driver of "classic skis with negative camber". These boots are built with the rockered free ride skis in mind…..not antiquated relics. But don't get me wrong, I love driving a relic every once in a while, but I'll dig out a different boot for that experience. 


All depends on how you ski, you can still ski really forward, with lots of forward lean on rockered skis, no problem. Just most people don't.

post #15 of 15
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