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Downhill ski poles and ISO 7331 specifications

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Hi,

I found racing new ski poles (the curved ones) for $50. So I said why not. BUT it says does not met ISO 7331 specifications.

 

What is that? And do all poles have to meet it?

 

Thanks

post #2 of 18

Hmmm. Have never realized poles have specs. (Actually, I guess all things made by anyone anywhere for any purpose have a tech agency issuing specs. Even apple pies.) Prolly about the shafts resisting bending stress, so no breaking and impaling us. :eek  Perhaps GS and SG poles don't make the cut cuz they're already bent. But seriously, don't think any racer studies his/her poles' ISO specs. Other things to worry about...

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

Hmmm. Have never realized poles have specs. (Actually, I guess all things made by anyone anywhere for any purpose have a tech agency issuing specs. Even apple pies.) Prolly about the shafts resisting bending stress, so no breaking and impaling us. :eek  Perhaps GS and SG poles don't make the cut cuz they're already bent. But seriously, don't think any racer studies his/her poles' ISO specs. Other things to worry about...


Do I need detachable straps? What is the safest poles?

post #4 of 18

Uh, I was making a joke. There are no safest racing poles. If you get them tangled under you in a fall at speed, they hurt. So you want to make sure your hand will come out of the strap easily. Which is about the way you hold the grip. That's all. No special brand comparo. Lekis used to actually detach in a fall, but the new one's really don't. Anyway, you don't actually use GS poles, in the sense of touching the snow, except in the lift line or when you're walking in your boots to the warming hut. So get light ones. 

post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

Uh, I was making a joke. There are no safest racing poles. If you get them tangled under you in a fall at speed, they hurt. So you want to make sure your hand will come out of the strap easily. Which is about the way you hold the grip. That's all. No special brand comparo. Lekis used to actually detach in a fall, but the new one's really don't. Anyway, you don't actually use GS poles, in the sense of touching the snow, except in the lift line or when you're walking in your boots to the warming hut. So get light ones. 

So lakis dont detach? The trigger grip doesnt? Which ones detach?

Also with lakies there is no way the pole will be hanging off your hand like conventional straps (if you get into the strap from the bottom) so how they work?


Edited by qwerty53 - 1/29/14 at 9:18pm
post #6 of 18

"ISO 7331:2011 defines the minimum requirements for safety in ski-poles for alpine skiing and specifies test methods to check conformity with these requirements.

Special designs may deviate from ISO 7331:2011, but shall be marked in a durable manner as special designs."

That from the ISO website.  But what the specifics of the testing are will cost someone 92.00 CHF to find out.

BTW its "Leki", not "laki."  And the trigger poles do detach, I have a pair.

post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 

I like Leki. Yes they detach but I also want to open my hand and have them released (like regular strap meaning hanging on my hand freely) which is why there is the "right" way to put regular strap on your hand. So if you fall they are not all over the place.

 

Is there other company that does detachable straps?

 

Thanks..

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwerty53 View Post
 

So lakis dont detach? The trigger grip doesnt? Which ones detach?

Also with lakies there is no way the pole will be hanging of your hand like conventional straps (if you get into the strap from the bottom) so how they work?

The trigger S detaches, yes. But the mechanism was changed from the original Trigger because of complaints it detached too easily or the slot plugged up with snow. The new one no longer comes off in most falls. So any possible protection - mainly for thumbs - seems negated. I suggest you look at the Leki site to see how they work. The strap is part of the attachment that stays with your glove. AFAIK, no other company does detachables. 

 

Leki, for its part, has always been very coy about whether the Trigger helped in falls or simply was a convenience/anti-theft device. I own a original Trigger model, like them for their Ti construction, nicely balanced. But Lekis get stolen all the time because it's cheaper to grab a newish pair and pay $50 for the replacement glove attachments. Or if you have a pair already, you upgrade by grabbing someone else's, plugging them in. And they're a PITA because they don't go around your ski tips, so get knocked over on stands and scattered. My wife sold her Trigger S's because of that and because she had issues getting them on and off with heavy gloves. 

 

Look, you are seeming kinda urgent about this.There's nothing magical about pole safety, no special brand. As I stated earlier, the best way to be safe with GS poles is to have plenty of strap open, put your hand in correctly so they pull out easily. And yep, end up all over the place. Better than sticking into your stomach. Oh yeah, and don't fall. ;) 

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwerty53 View Post

 

Is there other company that does detachable straps?

 

Goode does, but they don't detach just because you open your hand.  Their system is similar to Leki's except that AFAIK you have to also buy their gloves or they come with a regular type strap that attaches to the grip just like the gloves do.

post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 

The problem is that they dont detach when you fall its all "if caught on tree or gate..."

post #11 of 18

Did you have an accident with that? Keep in mind that GS poles have teenie conical baskets that are designed to be pretty hard to catch on a gate, and reduced length tips. Unclear whether you're speaking from experience or are just worried. And why would you use them in the trees? :confused​ 

post #12 of 18
Both my old aluminum and new CF poles says not according to iso 7331, both work fine, only reason I retired the aluminum is there's a deep gouge from edge contact and I'm afraid it'll break there and stab me.

The aluminum pole is a lot thinner than regular recreational aluminum poles, so probably not as strong, thus not conforming to iso, but in the years I've used it I never felt it lacking in strength.

Although now I'm using some $17 plastic poles, not nearly as nice but I don't worry about them grow legs when I leave them on the rack an go for a few poleless runs.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwerty53 View Post
 

The problem is that they dont detach when you fall its all "if caught on tree or gate..."

The point of them is to be right where they should be if you lose your grip on the pole.  The problem would be if they DID detach if you caught them on a gate.  Unless you are at the bottom of the course a lost ski pole means a DQ.

post #14 of 18

ISO 7331 mostly refers to the size of the top of the grip. Most racing poles grips are small in order to facilitate a better tuck, but the grip size is smaller than most ocular openings. 

 

"Be careful, you might poke your eye out"

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by The-Mantra View Post
 

 The problem would be if they DID detach if you caught them on a gate.  Unless you are at the bottom of the course a lost ski pole means a DQ.

 

Local house rules?  ICR & NCR don't care about ski poles for determining correct passage.

post #16 of 18
Most (not all) Goode poles include a detachable strap. There's a sliding lock mechanism on the top of the grip with a tension slot the strap clips into. If the lock mechanism isn't in the locked position, keeping the strap in the slot, the pole will often detach in a fall or if it get snagged, while the strap stays on your hand/glove. I've used that system since the late 80s and love it. However, like any "safety" system, it's not fool proof and won't release in every fall, plus, if the plastic clip slot wears, the strap will come unclipped really easily and often.
post #17 of 18

 

 

Here are some old kermas in the garage that have a leather strap that attaches to the buckle via a plastic device that does break apart. I have had them come off during some fun wipeouts and crashes.

post #18 of 18

If you like Leki but want a regular stap, you probably want this.

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