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Gear Review Marquette Backcountry skis

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

so one word to describe these things FUN!!!(as hell)

 

the skinny....well there not so skinny or long. They are 140cm long and have sidecut of 150-130-140 with huge rockered tip and scaled bottom. They break trail incredibly easily literally impossible to stuff the tip into the snow even if you try. The bases are plastic which basically means they are impossible to break or score and they do not have metal edge but the plastic edge will hold on hard(but not icey) groomed snow pretty damn well.

 

I have mine mounted with Voile 3 pins and using an old plastic garmont tele boot.

 

pros

 

simply put huge amount of float, while out with a buddy on BC125 I will stay on top of the snow way better than him

easier to turn

the tip can ski over logs and other thins cover below the snow so easily that I basically aim at logs now because they are mearly jumps

break trail super easily

the scaled pattern in soft snow due to huge surface area is quite grippy going up

when the scaled pattern fails you herringbone or sidestep is easier to short lenght

short lenght lets you go though tight spot while traversing/going up than could be done on conventional waxless BC skis

plastic bases cna be run over rocks and logs with basically no damage

super cheap(140 bucks for a pair of skis)

 

 

cons 

 

heavy

slow everywhere going across or down, especially on packed snow

sideways on hardpack snow is nearly impossible 

 

so much fun though

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #2 of 18
Dude, drop a knee! smile.gif
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Dude, drop a knee! smile.gif

 

 

eh skiing them alpine because when in thin cover the rear leg can still catch log and stuff, simply does not happen when skiing them parallel 

post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 They break trail incredibly easily literally impossible to stuff the tip into the snow even if you try.

I have mine mounted with Voile 3 pins and using an old plastic garmont tele boot.

 

 

 

 skiing them alpine because when in thin cover the rear leg can still catch log and stuff, simply does not happen when skiing them parallel 

 

 

 

 

 

Based on your ski review, a fairly(very) passive binding and boots that probably not all that burly, it sounds like your first task on your way to L3 tele is learning a non poodling stance.

Have fun, It's a great journey. 

post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave W View Post
 

 

 

 

Based on your ski review, a fairly(very) passive binding and boots that probably not all that burly, it sounds like your first task on your way to L3 tele is learning a non poodling stance.

Have fun, It's a great journey. 

 

 

not sure what you mean by non poodling......

 

at the resort one day after work I was making some tele turns on them where I could trust the tip of hte rear ski not diving.

 

 

realize that these skis are so far from a typical tele ski that anything on them is going to be different. 

post #6 of 18

Those things would be the tits for checking a trap line or maple syrup gathering.

post #7 of 18

I've been wanting something that'll float and turn, my Rossi BC65 ski / bc NNN boot binding leave allot to be desired there. Looking at the S-Bound 98 or 112, feeling stuck with NNN BC boot binding.

 

It's hard to invest to much into something for use in my local park (Philly's Fairmount Park Valley Green), when decent snow events are so few and far between…winter of '96, '09, '10 and a slight maybe for '14 don't know yet, off to a good start up 'till this weekend/week forecast for 50*F Sunday :(

 

Was thumbing thru a Nordic Skier magazine at Barnes & Nobel and saw a add for the Whitewoods Outlander 130cm 96-55-96 http://eriksports.com/2013/#/17/zoomed

 

Anyone try the Outlander? I'm thinking the Marquette's look even better only i'll need to invest in a duck bill boot/binding so... 

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by neonorchid View Post
 

I've been wanting something that'll float and turn, my Rossi BC65 ski / bc NNN boot binding leave allot to be desired there. Looking at the S-Bound 98 or 112, feeling stuck with NNN BC boot binding.

 

It's hard to invest to much into something for use in my local park (Philly's Fairmount Park Valley Green), when decent snow events are so few and far between…winter of '96, '09, '10 and a slight maybe for '14 don't know yet, off to a good start up 'till this weekend/week forecast for 50*F Sunday :(

 

Was thumbing thru a Nordic Skier magazine at Barnes & Nobel and saw a add for the Whitewoods Outlander 130cm 96-55-96 http://eriksports.com/2013/#/17/zoomed

 

Anyone try the Outlander? I'm thinking the Marquette's look even better only i'll need to invest in a duck bill boot/binding so... 


Why would you need to invest in a duck bill?    The Marquette will fit NNN-BC just fine.

Other choices:

 

http://www.karhu.com/backcountry-hunt-classic-ski#.UuxsLVJKp8E

http://altaiskis.com/products/the-hok/

 

OTOH, if you really want a long ski, then the Rossi BC125 is really choice.

post #9 of 18
I like to pull my Marquette skis out when the snows wanky, just had an ice storm and skate skiing is no good the trails have been too icy. After getting a trail report from friends I pulled out my Marquette skis broke a trail next to the too icy to ski groomed skate ski trail and now there is a trail for me to ski until the skate ski trail improves.

They are good for backcountry skijoring ( of course you don't go that fast) and one does not need to worry about slashing up your pups back legs cause there are no metal edges.

They are good to for end of season skiing, let you eek out a few of those last few days of skiing in the spring.
post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 

I honestly think even the guys that have them are underselling them. They honestly ski steeper hill quite well. IN fact with the 8-10 inch od powder on top of Ice/stumps/rocks they are much better than my roommates BC125s.... The NNN BC will feel very very skidish on this ski on hard pack. the investment in Duckbill was minimal. 45 bucks for some new Voile 3 pins, and 45 bucks for some used 3 buckle tele boots. It would have been much more to use a NNN BC binding/burly NNN BC boot and the combo will not drive this ski as well. 

 

The thing is they should float better than just about anything and has made me realize that my first real edged ski will be some Voile Charger BC...

post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 


Why would you need to invest in a duck bill?    The Marquette will fit NNN-BC just fine.

Other choices:

 

http://www.karhu.com/backcountry-hunt-classic-ski#.UuxsLVJKp8E

http://altaiskis.com/products/the-hok/

 

OTOH, if you really want a long ski, then the Rossi BC125 is really choice.

Ok, i was going on ORS description http://www.orscrosscountryskisdirect.com/marquette-backcountry-skis.html  

 

Checked out the BC 125 on their site, didn't know it was redesigned with rocker, site says you can use a BC NNN setup. I'll guess due to the tip rocker ease of initiating a turn requiring less boot driving power, idk????

 

I'm not in love with my Fischer BCX-6 boots. They pinch down on tops and side of my big and little toes in stride. I've stretched the area many times with a Hoke Ball and Ring stretcher, http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/121145554556?lpid=82 - works a little then it's back to hurting my feet. I've tried other boots, so far the BCX-6 has been the best of them. The Alpina pressed down directly on the base of my big toe nail, that was worse! Couldn't fit the Rossignol's, Two years ago version Madzhus Gitterland's upper skeleton cuff dug into my shin. Didn't try the Salomons. If we had more worthwhile snow events where i live i'd pursue it more aggressively. As it is if i need to get a duckbill, and although two different purposes, spending the extra money for a Scrapa T4 or even a Fischer BCX675 seems like money that could go toward a dedicated light weight AT setup. However if the duckbill boots (BCX-675) types don't pinch inward on the sides/tops of my pinky and big toes it could be worth switching.

 

Never heard of Altaiskis, the Kom looks interesting http://altaiskis.com/2013/04/testing-and-development-of-the-kom/

post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by neonorchid View Post
 

Checked out the BC 125 on their site, didn't know it was redesigned with rocker, site says you can use a BC NNN setup. I'll guess due to the tip rocker ease of initiating a turn requiring less boot driving power, idk????

 

Boy, I'd never recommend a NNN-BC setup with a ski like the BC 125. Not enough boot. I have Fischer sBound 98's, and they're OK for up & down, but I do a lot of flat in between.  If I were really going down a lot, I'd put a pair of 3-pins on those skis.  Go to the next size up ski (sBound 112 or BC 125).... definitely a duck-bill.  NNN-BC just isn't that burly. And I have probably the strongest NNN-BC boot on the market, the Alpina 2150.

post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by tch View Post
 
.  NNN-BC just isn't that burly. And I have probably the strongest NNN-BC boot on the market, the Alpina 2150.

 

You're right as far as the majority of NNN-BC boots go, but there are far stronger NNN-BC boots than the 2150, including all-plastic ones with lace-up inner liners. 


Edited by cantunamunch - 2/2/14 at 8:34am
post #14 of 18

My current backyard ski (20 acres, ~175' Vert) just to stay somewhat on topic.

Rossi Cut 110, ~105,78,100 8M radius, bought 5 pairs for $25 (total) when the rental shop switched to Head. Chili bindings, now on their 3rd pair of skis. Coll-tex skins purchased at Outdoor Gear Exchange when they unloaded a bunch of narrow skins for $14 a pair, and well worn (250+ days?) Ener-Gs. cheap thrills indeed.

With the short length, not that much width and a relatively big boot its easy to bury the tips of either ski if I'm not careful once the snow gets 6"+ deep particularly when heavy, but they're still a hoot, particularly when resort skiing them.

 

Now to continue off topic.....

Quote:

Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

 

 

not sure what you mean by non poodling......

 


Even with my passive chili bindings if I let my back foot drift too far back it pushes the tip of the trailing ski into the snow enough I wind up hanging by my trailing foot when it punches through or under any heavy snow, downed branches, or snow snakes waiting to eat that back ski. Since this is a major drift further Info to be PMed.

post #15 of 18
Bought these b/c mountain biking this winter has been near impossible in PA. Much cheaper investment than a Fat Bike as well.

Couple of pictures from an area I mountain bike near my house. Nice to fit in an hour workout w a bit of skiing in for good measure.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by VTskibum View Post

Bought these b/c mountain biking this winter has been near impossible in PA. Much cheaper investment than a Fat Bike as well.

Couple of pictures from an area I mountain bike near my house. Nice to fit in an hour workout w a bit of skiing in for good measure.

Am curious to hear how they work out for you. I too ordered a pair, hoping they'll arrive before the snow is gone, i'm horrified by the end of week forecast! 

 

P.S., where are the pix?

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by neonorchid View Post
 

Am curious to hear how they work out for you. I too ordered a pair, hoping they'll arrive before the snow is gone, i'm horrified by the end of week forecast! 

 

P.S., where are the pix?

MC BC trees.jpeg

post #18 of 18

^looks good.

I returned mine, seemed like they'd be to heavy for the trek into and out of the hills i'd wanna hit in Fairmount Park's Valley Green on the rare occasions we get significant snow to use them. 

Considering the metal edge/cap construction Altai Hok Ski. Also the Voile Charger BC looks pretty sick. Seriously doubt a Rossignol BC X12 75mm boot would cut it with that ski, not even sure it would do for a Rossi BC 125 ski. My Fischer BCX-6 are history and i'm back and fourth between a NNN BC Salomon X Adv 6, Rossi BC X6/X10 and the duck bill BC X12 to replace the Fischer.

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