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90-98mm Skis for New England "Powder Days"

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I am looking for suggestions on a 90+mm ski for the uncommon powder days we have in the Northeast or to take out West for the yearly trip. Typically we don't get much more than 6" snowfalls and the fresh stuff gets skied out within the 1st hour of the mountain opening. Therefore I am looking for something that will go through the cut up snow easily. 

 

I have been skiing for 30+ years and am a pretty strong skier who skis all terrain in the Northeast and West. I am 5'9"/185 lbs. I tend to prefer a solid carving ski with decent edge hold but looking for something to add to the quiver to have more fun with to bounce around in the soft bumps.

 

I currently have the following in my lineup

Dynastar TroubleMaker - 175 

Blizzard Magnum 8.5 - 174 

Rossignol E98 - 180

Volkl Bridge - 177

 

The ski I am looking to replace is the Bridge. Although I like how it skis in the soft stuff or when I lay it over on edge but I really don't like no camber under foot. I would like something that isn't as "squirrly" once things get packed out. On days where we do get snow I will typically ski the Bridge in the morning and switch to the 8.5 or E98 as the day progresses. I am looking for a ski that I can run on all day and not worry about having to change out.

post #2 of 15

The Magnum 8.5 is squirrely?

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 

The Magnum 8.5 is squirrely?

No neither the Magnum nor the E98 are. I was referring to the Volkl Bridge as being squirrely. I prefer camber in my skis and although the Bridge is fun in the snow I am talking about once it gets tracked out and we are running groomers I do not like the feel of a flat ski under foot.

post #4 of 15

So you have an 81, 85,95 and 98mm ski and you want a 90mm?  The difference between an 85 and 95 is about 0.4 inches.  You havea good 85mm and a good 95mm ski.  If neither of those do it, I don't think a ski that is in between is going to do it either.   I ski my Nordica Steadfast, 90mm, in anything from hard pack to 12+" of powder.  I could probably do the same with a Blizzard Magnum 8.5 or a Rossi E98.  I'm not sure what it is you're looking for becase less than 1/4" is not going to make a big difference.

post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 

So you have an 81, 85,95 and 98mm ski and you want a 90mm?  The difference between an 85 and 95 is about 0.4 inches.  You havea good 85mm and a good 95mm ski.  If neither of those do it, I don't think a ski that is in between is going to do it either.   I ski my Nordica Steadfast, 90mm, in anything from hard pack to 12+" of powder.  I could probably do the same with a Blizzard Magnum 8.5 or a Rossi E98.  I'm not sure what it is you're looking for becase less than 1/4" is not going to make a big difference.

As suggested in my original post I am looking for a 90+mm ski to replace my 95mm Volkl Bridge. The 8.5 and E98 are my go to skis when there is no fresh snow and running groomers all day which is typical in the Northeast. I want something that is more playful on the occasional snow day that I can run easier in on soft bumps and trips out west. I cannot go with anything over 100 as I have issues with my knee and turning over a wider ski puts too much pressure on the ACL.

post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by NESkiBum View Post
 

As suggested in my original post I am looking for a 90+mm ski to replace my 95mm Volkl Bridge. The 8.5 and E98 are my go to skis when there is no fresh snow and running groomers all day which is typical in the Northeast. I want something that is more playful on the occasional snow day that I can run easier in on soft bumps and trips out west. I cannot go with anything over 100 as I have issues with my knee and turning over a wider ski puts too much pressure on the ACL.

 

 

 

hows you alignment?

 

I was knockkneed but since I switched to boot canted properly I no long have knee pain on wide skis on hard snow.

post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

 

 

 

hows you alignment?

 

I was knockkneed but since I switched to boot canted properly I no long have knee pain on wide skis on hard snow.

Alignment is fine with slight cuff adjustment to the outside to accommodate a bit of bowleggedness. The added pressure of turning over a wider ski with 45 year old knees on a 100+ ski is more than I prefer. Also given that most skiing is in the Northeast I like a ski under 100mm in the tight bumps and trees for edge to edge transitions.

post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by NESkiBum View Post
 

Alignment is fine with slight cuff adjustment to the outside to accommodate a bit of bowleggedness. The added pressure of turning over a wider ski with 45 year old knees on a 100+ ski is more than I prefer. Also given that most skiing is in the Northeast I like a ski under 100mm in the tight bumps and trees for edge to edge transitions.

 

 

you actually have that backwards and my guess is you actually make you bow legged worse by going to the outside...... pictures and video would prove my point and its also my guess on why big skis hurt your knees.

post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

 

 

you actually have that backwards and my guess is you actually make you bow legged worse by going to the outside...... pictures and video would prove my point and its also my guess on why big skis hurt your knees.

Bott cuff adjustment is NOT canting and is simply meant to center your lower keg in the boot cuff. 

 

 

Adjusting the cuff slightly outward to center a bow legged stance in the cuff makes perfect sense, as long as you do not adjust it farther than what centers your leg in the cuff!

 

 

ONce centered if alignment is still off , you need to get canted.

post #10 of 15
What Josh and A-man sed.

As far as a replacement for your bridges, the Nordica Soul Rider is your ticket.
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by NESkiBum View Post
 

As suggested in my original post I am looking for a 90+mm ski to replace my 95mm Volkl Bridge. The 8.5 and E98 are my go to skis when there is no fresh snow and running groomers all day which is typical in the Northeast. I want something that is more playful on the occasional snow day that I can run easier in on soft bumps and trips out west. I cannot go with anything over 100 as I have issues with my knee and turning over a wider ski puts too much pressure on the ACL.

Coupla ideas about wider skis: 1) You might consider plates. Some here disapprove, some approve, but they do give your knees a bit more biomechanical advantage, by changing the angles, so you can go wider. 2) Josh and you are both right about the canting. He's right because it will not change the angles your tibia creates relative to the ski base, so no less strain on the knees or more aligned stance with the bases. You're right because it'll be more comfortable when neither side of the upper shell is pressuring your leg. I'd suggest you talk to a fitter about planing the base of your boots. 3) IME some wider skis are more stressful than others, and I suspect it's because of stiffness rather than width. Have you tried a softy like the Bent Chetler? Skis like that are also a lot more fun in tight places with irregular soft surfaces because of their suppleness. Not for charging, obviously, but everyone has their own agendas for powder. 

post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
 

Bott cuff adjustment is NOT canting and is simply meant to center your lower keg in the boot cuff. 

 

 

Adjusting the cuff slightly outward to center a bow legged stance in the cuff makes perfect sense, as long as you do not adjust it farther than what centers your leg in the cuff!

 

 

ONce centered if alignment is still off , you need to get canted.

Thanks Atomicman. Exactly what was done with adjusting the cuff outward slightly to center lower leg into the boot. No canting has been done nor needed at this time. 

post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post


As far as a replacement for your bridges, the Nordica Soul Rider is your ticket.

Thanks markojp. That was one of the skis I was thinking of. Heard it's pretty playful but still holds an edge when needed.

post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by NESkiBum View Post
 

Thanks Atomicman. Exactly what was done with adjusting the cuff outward slightly to center lower leg into the boot. No canting has been done nor needed at this time. 

I think what Josh and others are suggesting is that canting actually may be what you need to help out your knees.

 

Put another way, once a ski gets wider than our boot last, we start noticing the stress on our knees if we are on firm snow. If our knees are already compromised either from nature or injury, they'll tell us about it sooner. So one way to get along with wider skis is not to use them on firm snow, and to ski soft snow more with smears and pivots than big edge angles. Another way is to get plates. Another is to get the boot sole canted, one way or another.

 

But the real issue isn't about wide skis and powder. We try to make sure the angle formed by our tibia and the ski base is as close to 90 degrees as possible for all skiing. For instance, I am slightly knock kneed. So forget about stress, this produces excess pressure on the inside of each ski - think snowplow orientation - and slower edge to edge transitions, not to mention issues with my inside ski in a turn, unless I get work done on my boots. For you, being bow legged without straightening out the tibia/base angle means that you have to work harder to get your inside edge on your outside ski doing its job. And that's a critical edge on hardpack. Just sayin'... 

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by NESkiBum View Post
 

I am looking for suggestions on a 90+mm ski for the uncommon powder days we have in the Northeast or to take out West for the yearly trip. Typically we don't get much more than 6" snowfalls and the fresh stuff gets skied out within the 1st hour of the mountain opening. Therefore I am looking for something that will go through the cut up snow easily. 

 

I have been skiing for 30+ years and am a pretty strong skier who skis all terrain in the Northeast and West. I am 5'9"/185 lbs. I tend to prefer a solid carving ski with decent edge hold but looking for something to add to the quiver to have more fun with to bounce around in the soft bumps.

 

I currently have the following in my lineup

Dynastar TroubleMaker - 175 

Blizzard Magnum 8.5 - 174 

Rossignol E98 - 180

Volkl Bridge - 177

 

The ski I am looking to replace is the Bridge. Although I like how it skis in the soft stuff or when I lay it over on edge but I really don't like no camber under foot. I would like something that isn't as "squirrly" once things get packed out. On days where we do get snow I will typically ski the Bridge in the morning and switch to the 8.5 or E98 as the day progresses. I am looking for a ski that I can run on all day and not worry about having to change out.

You are searching for an" east coast all mountain carver"... Somethings that you can have fun on the icy hardpack but also in trees and bumps:

 

Olders skis:

2013 Volkl tigershark 10 feet (all mountain sl carver with wicked edge hold)

 

2014 skis:

Blizzard Brahma ( almost the power of the G-Power combien with versatility)

Élan amphibio 88 xti ( really nice carver that can do anything)

Kastle fx84 ( not so much pop for me at 208 pounds but maybe for someone lighter...)

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