or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Mountain/Resort Related Forums › Family Skiing Discussions › 3 Tips to Keep your family Ski Trip Simple
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

3 Tips to Keep your family Ski Trip Simple

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Our Parent site has an article on this, which I thought was worth sharing

Three Steps to Keep Your Family Ski Trip Simple 

I'll share a few snips from the article...

 

 

 

Quote:
1. Leave the skis

It’s because of the conditions. Fleischer says you may need different skis for different conditions. “Powder skis for powder days, carving skis for the groomers, and an all-mountain or fat ski for the crud and bumps.”

 

Quote:
 

2. Buy & Bring Boots

Chad’s bottom line advice is to invest in ski boots and not skis. “When you travel, take your ski (or snowboard) boots on the airplane with you so if your luggage is lost, you still have your ski boots and you’ll be comfy and happy. 

 

Quote:
3. Clothing Can Go Either Way
Many ski towns also have second-hand sports stores with clothing and gear, which is another option for a cost-conscious family. Load up on used clothing for you and the kids and then sell it back at the end of your trip. It’s just one more option to keeping it simple on your next family ski vacation. 

 

post #2 of 20

Here's a tip I learned the hard way.  If you are checking multiple bags for your family, pack some of your daily essentials split amongst each bag.  As in, throw a couple of pair of your underwear, socks, etc. in each bag, not one bag per person.  That way, if one bag doesn't arrive everyone will have something to wear for a day or two until the bag arrives.

 

Learned this a few weeks ago when the bag containing all of my wife's clothing and most of my son's didn't show till day number 3 of our trip.  Believe it or not, there is NO PLACE in Big Sky to buy underwear.  There is money to be made here for someone looking to open a business in Big Sky.  70 people on our flight alone had bags that didn't arrive with the plane.

 

Luckily, two of us had carried on most of what was needed to ski the first day, while my wife went clothes shopping.

post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 

That is a really good tip.  I should do that when Phil and I travel too. 

post #4 of 20
My ski bum dream - Underwear 'R Us in Big Sky :-)
post #5 of 20

Just remember to rent from Steamboat Ski which is just a couple of shop down from Chads Thumbs Up  

 

(and "well tuned" rental skis is a oxymoron)  

post #6 of 20

I just can't agree with the leave the skis part if you own any kind of performance ski.  My experience with rentals is they are poorly maintained and frequently require a change in technique that might not be too comfortable for many.  I always bring my front side skis and will rent powder skis if the conditions are right.  Even if you only ski 10x/year, that's at least $350/year to rent and after 2 seasons you could apply that same cash to a fairly nice set of skis.  On top of that, you avoid all the time filling out forms and waiting around the rental shop when you could be out skiing with your own boards.  That said, it probably makes sense to rent some powder skis if the conditions are right but that's generally only a fraction of the time. 

 

By all means the boot recommendation is right on.  Carry these on with all your essentials.  Probably not an issue if you have a non-stop flight but who knows.

 

Why would you want to take the chance of having to buy your ski clothes at the area.  What if they don't have a second hand shop?  You could spend a fortune over buying things at home where you have time to find a good deals.  I think this is a disastrous recommendation.

post #7 of 20

Buy used ski clothing and then sell it back?  WTF?

 

Yeah, nothing says 'vacation' like going to a used clothing store TWICE, while on a nice relaxing vacation.   Sounds like a waste of 2+ hours to me.

post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork View Post
 

Here's a tip I learned the hard way.  If you are checking multiple bags for your family, pack some of your daily essentials split amongst each bag.  

 

Yeah, I always put a change of clothes in my carry-on and wear my ski jacket on the plane.

 

#4 tip to make the family ski trip the most simple of all:  Leave the family at home!  :devil: 

post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natche View Post
 

I just can't agree with the leave the skis part if you own any kind of performance ski.  My experience with rentals is they are poorly maintained and frequently require a change in technique that might not be too comfortable for many.  I always bring my front side skis and will rent powder skis if the conditions are right.  Even if you only ski 10x/year, that's at least $350/year to rent and after 2 seasons you could apply that same cash to a fairly nice set of skis.  On top of that, you avoid all the time filling out forms and waiting around the rental shop when you could be out skiing with your own boards.  That said, it probably makes sense to rent some powder skis if the conditions are right but that's generally only a fraction of the time. 

 

By all means the boot recommendation is right on.  Carry these on with all your essentials.  Probably not an issue if you have a non-stop flight but who knows.

 

Why would you want to take the chance of having to buy your ski clothes at the area.  What if they don't have a second hand shop?  You could spend a fortune over buying things at home where you have time to find a good deals.  I think this is a disastrous recommendation.

I think renting skis for a family trip is not such a bad idea, especially for the kids, but I agree with the clothing recommendation being crazy. 

 

I can't imagine trying to find clothing that fits on a vacation, and wasting a vacation day shopping for clothing instead of skiing. 

post #10 of 20
Actually, here's a little trick to getting a rental or demo that's in better shape than others: just show some interest in the rentals. If there's not a crowd, ask if some of their skis have fewer days on them, because many operations don't exactly rotate skis to give all of them equal wear. Casually ask how often they tune or wax and your man is fairly likely to take a few minutes to run yours over the waxer, and may even let you paw through what he's got for something without a lot of dings or wear on the edges. Some rental staff truly don't give a damn, but mostly they're just bored and irritated by people who don't know or care what they're doing.

This is doubly or triply true for demos. Take some time, ask some questions, and show that you know the difference between a tuned or waxed ski and one that's been battered, and they'll try to take care of you.

As for hitting up second hand sporting goods stores for clothes and gear, I think it's a brilliant idea for a family from a non-skiing area that would otherwise pay full retail as well as baggage fees and the hassle of handling unnecessary luggage. We've got some very good second hand sporting goods stores in Salt Lake, retail stores for backcountry.com and levelninesports.com, and, if you feel like going broke, a Patagonia outlet store.

Another tip I didn't see here is to ship gear to your lodging if you're going for more than a few days. Unlike many I make regular use of USPS shipping services, which have always outperformed their promises, so I recommend them as a carrier. Having your gear waiting for you in your room may be worth paying standard USPS or FedEx shipping rates on a few boxes of clothing and toiletries.
post #11 of 20

I think my #1 for many families, especially those with younger or less hardy kids, would be to stay at a place that is ski-in/ski-out or a short walk to the lifts (preferably near the ski school).  That seems  a lot more simple that buying and reselling clothing while on vacation...that belongs more with a title to how to save $, not keep it simple.

post #12 of 20
I guess I missed the gist of this forum, "family". I do think renting skis for kids does make sense. I was thinking more about adults. I can't imagine checking 5 ski bags and then trying to haul all thAt stuff from an airport.
post #13 of 20

For families who plan to travel regularly for skiing, useful to have each kid able to carry the basics of their own stuff.  Saw a group that seemed to include two related families on the way to SLC.  Each kid had their own Transpack Jr.  Youngest was perhaps 7, oldest probably in high school.

 

When my daughter had small boots, a small rolling carry-on worked well has her boot bag for plane flights.  Waited until she was older and got a regular Transpack so skipped having a Transpack Jr.

post #14 of 20
I also disagree with the "rent vs bring" skis point.

My three kids all have their own skis, in addition to that of my wife and I. They use their skis for our local weekend trips and are quite comfortable with the lengths and widths. We go out West once a year for six to seven days and if all five of us rented skis for six days in Utah at $35 per pair (which is on the low price side), that would amount to more than $1,000 in rental fees alone. Not to mention having to deal with teenagers who would not stop complaining that their rental skis are too long, or fat, or heavy, or hard to turn, or awful color. No thanks. I would rather bring all our skis, save that thousand $, and reduce any other elements in the trip that would complicate the trip. I normally rent an SUV at the airport with ski racks anyway so they all fit on the roof from the get go. If there is powder where we go, then we demo fat skis. But getting deep powder has been once in three or four years.
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclist View Post

I also disagree with the "rent vs bring" skis point.

My three kids all have their own skis, in addition to that of my wife and I. They use their skis for our local weekend trips and are quite comfortable with the lengths and widths. We go out West once a year for six to seven days and if all five of us rented skis for six days in Utah at $35 per pair (which is on the low price side), that would amount to more than $1,000 in rental fees alone. Not to mention having to deal with teenagers who would not stop complaining that their rental skis are too long, or fat, or heavy, or hard to turn, or awful color. No thanks. I would rather bring all our skis, save that thousand $, and reduce any other elements in the trip that would complicate the trip. I normally rent an SUV at the airport with ski racks anyway so they all fit on the roof from the get go. If there is powder where we go, then we demo fat skis. But getting deep powder has been once in three or four years.

Did you bring all the skis before the kids were teens?  Certainly makes sense for a family likes your that are obviously really into skiing.  For a family on their first or second trip out west who have kids age 10 and younger who are beginners or intermediates, may not be the same.

post #16 of 20
Brought them every single time since thye were 4 years old. I buy used kids skis tune them to perfection, have bindings checked by REI, and use them for many years.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclist View Post

Brought them every single time since thye were 4 years old. I buy used kids skis tune them to perfection, have bindings checked by REI, and use them for many years.

Lucky kids! :) 

 

I didn't take my daughter out west until she was 7 and good enough to ski blues at Alta.  She was old enough to help carry stuff, especially her own boot bag.  Of course, I still spoiled her because we stayed at Alta Lodge.  Took advantage of the Kids Stay Free in April for many years.

 

I guess staying slope side is another way to keep it simple for a family.

post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

 

I guess staying slope side is another way to keep it simple for a family.

 

When i was younger and skiing without a family I always thought that paying to stay slope side was crazy. Now, it's the only place I want to stay. So much less of a hassle. Especially when someone wants to quit early and head back to the hotel. 

post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skierish View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork View Post
 

Here's a tip I learned the hard way.  If you are checking multiple bags for your family, pack some of your daily essentials split amongst each bag.  

 

Yeah, I always put a change of clothes in my carry-on and wear my ski jacket on the plane.

 

#4 tip to make the family ski trip the most simple of all:  Leave the family at home!  :devil: 

Short-sighted thinking.  Investing in at least one big ski trip with family is the way to make sure someone will grow into a good ski buddy.  I'm looking forward to the day that my daughter is lugging all the heavy ski stuff.  Not to mention the possibility of fun with grandkids someday.

 

My Transpack is always stuffed with the basics for skiing.  Not just boots and helmet, but also ski pants, base layers, and ski socks.  Even though it's rarely cold enough to need it, I wear my ski jacket when leaving NC.

post #20 of 20

The shop for clothing idea is bizarre.  My backpack boot bag will also fit a day's worth of ski clothes, wearing the jacket on the plane of course.  My suitcase with everything else did not arrive in my hotel in Zermatt until 30 hours after I did, but I was still good to go for skiing the first day.

 

The idea of having key clothing items spread among different bags for multiple people is a good suggestion too. I'll have to remember that one. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Family Skiing Discussions
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Mountain/Resort Related Forums › Family Skiing Discussions › 3 Tips to Keep your family Ski Trip Simple