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WSJ article on Vail buying up local hills in the midwest - Page 2

post #31 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwestfabs View Post
 

if that is the case makes sense why vail resorts worked their way into both of these markets. would be interesting if some other conglomerate type resorts like boyne resorts (big sky et al), ... start creeping in as well ...

What?!  Boyne creeping into Michigan?  That's un-possible!

post #32 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwestfabs View Post
 

if that is the case makes sense why vail resorts worked their way into both of these markets. would be interesting if some other conglomerate type resorts like boyne resorts (big sky et al), ... start creeping in as well ...

What?!  Boyne creeping into Michigan?  That's un-possible!

should of looked at their corporate website not just big sky's...:D

post #33 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by focker View Post

Minnesota and Michigan have more 'vacation skiers' (not sure exactly how they define that, but I think it's flying or driving over 500 miles to ski) than any other state in the US according to some articles I read this summer.

 

 

Just and aside - I think a better definition of "vacation skier" would be any ski trip that involves the purchase of out-of-town lodging. 

 

Consider: when I lived in NYC, you had some New Yorkers who day trip up to Hunter.  You have others who went there to weekend.  Even though Hunter may be the "home" resort for both, the ones over-nighting are much more likely to show up ready to dump cash on things besides lift tickets.

post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdeangel View Post
 

 

Just and aside - I think a better definition of "vacation skier" would be any ski trip that involves the purchase of out-of-town lodging. 

 

Consider: when I lived in NYC, you had some New Yorkers who day trip up to Hunter.  You have others who went there to weekend.  Even though Hunter may be the "home" resort for both, the ones over-nighting are much more likely to show up ready to dump cash on things besides lift tickets.

 

True, but I think Vail doesn't look at it that way.   Think about it from their end.  they get all the money up front before the season starts from people in MN and MI buying season passes, then they get more money from those same people when they actually go out west.  Those people aren't necessarily going to stay at a Vail property, but they'll likely demo ski's, eat lunch, buy drinks, etc, etc... 

post #35 of 38
Thread Starter 

As near as I can tell, Vail's business strategy was to sell a season pass to every skier  in Colorado by pricing it so attractively that few can resist.

 

Now, they've extended that strategy to include Detroit and Minneapolis, where they won't get them all but they should get a bunch.  I'm curious to see if they are going to extend it to the east coast.

 

Remember, once you have the infrastructure in place, the marginal cost of one more skier on the hill is basically zero.  So these cheap season passes don't really cost the Vail corporation much, and they have the chance to make it up on other amenities.

post #36 of 38

...Probably because it is fast for Denver skiers and snowboarders to drive to and from Minnesota than it is to get up and down I-70 on the weekends. 

post #37 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post
 

As near as I can tell, Vail's business strategy was to sell a season pass to every skier  in Colorado by pricing it so attractively that few can resist.

 

Now, they've extended that strategy to include Detroit and Minneapolis, where they won't get them all but they should get a bunch.  I'm curious to see if they are going to extend it to the east coast.

 

Remember, once you have the infrastructure in place, the marginal cost of one more skier on the hill is basically zero.  So these cheap season passes don't really cost the Vail corporation much, and they have the chance to make it up on other amenities.


$50 lunches are profitable and vail knows it.....$500 lessons while instructors make $12 per hour are a cash cow as well. Might as well bring as many people in as possible

post #38 of 38
from an article on motley fools website Vail currently boasts more than 350,000 season-pass holders who contribute about 35%-40% of its ticket revenue. In fact, it grew the amount of sales contribution from season-pass sales by a 14% CAGR from slightly above $50 million in fiscal 2006 to in excess of $150 million in fiscal 2014. "

Knowing that in the Midwest people will ski in just about any weather condition it's a now brainier why some of these corporations would want to own smaller hills.
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