or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Adjusting Bindings

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Hello all,

 

My wife got some new skis at one of the Labor Day weekend sales this year and we need to adjust the bindings so they are properly set for her skill set and boots.

 

I am tired of dropping by the local ski shop and paying for something that looks to be fairly simple to do once you have the correct information (by using DIN calculator, etc).

 

I saw this website and the instructions look pretty straight forward: 

http://www.wikihow.com/Adjust-Ski-Bindings

 

 

Can anyone review these instructions and give feedback...or direct me to a better website?

 

I feel I am capable of setting up her skis if I just have a bit of information on how to do it.

 

Her skis are Salomon BBR Limelite from 2012/13 and I believe they have L9 bindings.

 

I appreciate your help...thanks!

 

 

EDIT:  I just found this site as well for L9 bindings:

http://theskimonster.com/blog/posts/how-to-adjust-your-salomon-ski-bindings/

post #2 of 21

Adjusting the bindings its self is not that hard but the liability that comes with it is the catch 22. If the skis are new to her I would suggest taking them in and having the bindings checked. Not only do they turn the DIN to the correct release setting but they will also check to make sure that the binding is releasing at the correct torque settings. This you can not do at home. After the bindings are checked then by all means take your wife's safety into your own hands. That usually goes well if anything happens she can blame you instead of the shop. Good thinking.  

post #3 of 21

Keep in mind that as important the DIN settings are, correct forward pressure is even more important.

post #4 of 21
Thread Starter 

So do all of you guys/girls take a new pair of skis/bindings to a ski shop when you first get them?

 

I am now less enthusiastic about this than I was an hour ago.

 

Is this truly something that I cannot do at home?

 

My wife is an absolute beginner. I am hoping to get her on some blues by the end of the season...maybe.

post #5 of 21

I wouldn't touch someone else's bindings without already having plenty of experience setting my own.  Are the bindings brand new?  Are they already mounted to the skis and were they mounted for someone else's boot size?  They will likely need to be re-drilled if the boot sizes are more than 1 cm different from hers.

post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

I wouldn't touch someone else's bindings without already having plenty of experience setting my own.  Are the bindings brand new?  Are they already mounted to the skis and were they mounted for someone else's boot size?  They will likely need to be re-drilled if the boot sizes are more than 1 cm different from hers.

Well it is just my wife...so I really don't care.    JOKING!!!  The last thing I want to do is set her bindings and then her ski pops off...I would never hear the end of it.

 

Her skis are brand new and the bindings were already mounted on there. I think I will just take them to the shop. You guys have mentioned enough to make me uncomfortable...so that's that.  Thanks for your input everyone.

post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceace414 View Post
 

  The last thing I want to do is set her bindings and then her ski pops off...I would never hear the end of it.

 

Good thinking my friend. Happy wife Happy life. Wife with knee issues........well good luck. 

post #8 of 21
(edited to add that I see you've made a sensible decision, but I'll leave the post in case someone wanted to respond to or correct something I said)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceace414 View Post

So do all of you guys/girls take a new pair of skis/bindings to a ski shop when you first get them?

I am now less enthusiastic about this than I was an hour ago.

Is this truly something that I cannot do at home?
You can do it at home, but you're gambling on whether the bindings have been checked since they were installed and whether something might have gone wrong with them.

I'll change my DIN setting if necessary; all I need for that is a screwdriver because I don't test the release, which requires that one knows what one is doing, so I get all my bindings checked every year by a shop. That may be overboard, but I'd rather know that they work the way they should. Edited to add that getting them checked every year may be overboard given the moderate number of ski days I have; someone else will have to opine about that.
Quote:
My wife is an absolute beginner. I am hoping to get her on some blues by the end of the season...maybe.
That means she is going to fall. If she falls awkwardly enough, she may need her binding to release. If the binding fails to release she may injure her knee or break her leg. And if she injures her knee or breaks her leg, she may refuse to ever ski again.

Someone is going to come on this thread and tell you how to test the bindings yourself and that it's no big deal. I'm not willing to take the chance because my knees are the last major joints I have that don't ache when the weather changes or when I load them. It's your choice.
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by cfr View Post
 

Keep in mind that as important the DIN settings are, correct forward pressure is even more important.

Be careful with this chart, it's out of date.  The chart changed in 2010 to include more columns for boot sole lengths.  I haven't been able to find a new one online anywhere, perhaps that's on purpose, I don't know.  Companies make us (shops) promise to only use the newest ones that come out in the shop practices manuals they send to us, but it hasn't changed since 2010.

 

 

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/124751/binding-adjustment

 

This is a hot topic as of late.  Check out the other thread (the link above) that covers a lot of your questions.  

post #10 of 21

If the bindings and skis are new, then have the shop you purchased them at set them for free.  If you didn't buy them from a shop, then a little research online will give you all the info you need.  I've always found the tech manual online for whatever binding I need to work on.  Most bindings are easy to adjust for the sole length of the boot, then the binding forward pressure is easy to adjust (but each binding has a different way of displaying the proper pressure), and the DIN is set by simply following a chart and setting them accordingly.  Yes, over time the bindings can lose their ability to correctly release, but you can have them checked at a later date at a shop.

 

If this all makes you nervous at all, then spend the money and have a shop do the adjustments.  For our household it's a necessity to do the adjustments ourselves with 16 skis between all of us.

 

Good luck!

 

T. - www.wasatchreport.com

post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by WasatchReport View Post

If the bindings and skis are new, then have the shop you purchased them at set them for free.  If you didn't buy them from a shop, then a little research online will give you all the info you need.  I've always found the tech manual online for whatever binding I need to work on.  Most bindings are easy to adjust for the sole length of the boot, then the binding forward pressure is easy to adjust (but each binding has a different way of displaying the proper pressure), and the DIN is set by simply following a chart and setting them accordingly.  Yes, over time the bindings can lose their ability to correctly release, but you can have them checked at a later date at a shop.

If this all makes you nervous at all, then spend the money and have a shop do the adjustments.  For our household it's a necessity to do the adjustments ourselves with 16 skis between all of us.

Good luck!

T. - www.wasatchreport.com

We have seen just as many bindings new out of the box be inconsistent.

A beginner, less aggressive skier will be a "type I" skier, a skier that prefers release over retention, the posters wife as a new skier, will tend to have slow twisting falls and be be better served having the binding release than stay on in a fall.
post #12 of 21

Philpug is right.  Also go read the threads re this issue.

 

OP....

 

Is binding adjustment hard, no.  Can it cause serious injury if done wrong, YES!

 

So if you have to ask, get someone (ie shop or pro) to help and teach you!

 

If you do it on a regular basis yourself and are encountering a new binding then asking here is likely good.  If not, get a pro to do it.

 

Remember your wife knows where you live and could easily have the keys to the NEW locks on the house if it goes wrong :eek.

post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibmon323 View Post
 

Be careful with this chart, it's out of date.  The chart changed in 2010 to include more columns for boot sole lengths.  I haven't been able to find a new one online anywhere, perhaps that's on purpose, I don't know.  Companies make us (shops) promise to only use the newest ones that come out in the shop practices manuals they send to us, but it hasn't changed since 2010.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/124751/binding-adjustment

 

This is a hot topic as of late.  Check out the other thread (the link above) that covers a lot of your questions.  

 

Updated with 2012-2013 version based on ASTM F-939 or ISO 8061 standards:

 

post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by cfr View Post
 

 

Updated with 2012-2013 version based on ASTM F-939 or ISO 8061 standards:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tn96MYCpenM 

post #15 of 21

The first step is to adjust the bindings for the correct preload for that boot size. 

http://theskimonster.com/blog/posts/how-to-adjust-your-salomon-ski-bindings/

 

The second step is to adjust the toe height and wing width if required on that model.

 

The third step is to adjust the release according to the chart.

 

The fourth step is to hope the bindings release true according to the chart.

post #16 of 21
You can always try to walk out of the bindings to make sure they release. Put on skis, bend your knees and twist your foot/leg left/right hard, it should release if your DIN isn't set to insanely high numbers.
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post

The first step is to adjust the bindings for the correct preload for that boot size. 
http://theskimonster.com/blog/posts/how-to-adjust-your-salomon-ski-bindings/

The second step is to adjust the toe height and wing width if required on that model.

The third step is to adjust the release according to the chart.

The fourth step is to hope the bindings release true according to the chart.

The fourth step is"hope"? Hope is not a strategy,
post #18 of 21

It is very easy to set the bindings to the correct or close enough DIN. It is easy to adjust the binding to the correct lenght of the boot.  It is easy to adjust the forward pressure.  That is all you have to do. 

 

However, and IMHO of course, peace of mind is worth paying to have a shop do it for you the first time before you wife skis them.

post #19 of 21
Dude, she is a beginner as well and you are asking these questions - go to a shop, if you haven't gone already. For 20$, the last thing you want to do is to keep wondering if the 3.5 you set it at was too high, after she tears one ACL... Or two. Been there, done that... Do not recommend getting near there. Also, pay for some lessons for her... Peace of mind is not expensive.

For me and the kids, racers, I mount the bindings and adjust them all the time on the 20+ skis we use... including some re-drilling etc and save a bundle throughout a season... but I've been doing it for a few years now... For racers, it is very different. Even at a shop, you specify the DIN yourself, the DIN your coach gave you, i.e. me smile.gif actually now they're trying to get us out of specifying DINs which is awkward, because the shops do not adjust based on how aggressive the skier is etc for instance...

I just got back from a SuperG camp where I have seen quite a few kids walk out of their bindings at high speeds, because of rutted icy turns... Setting DINs - It's a very tricky business...
Edited by razie - 1/25/14 at 8:23pm
post #20 of 21

I will adjust the bindings on my own skis, but not my wife's skis.  There is no way that saving a few bucks is worth whatever grief I would get if the bindings didn't release when they should or released when they shouldn't.

 

And I'm with Phil, hope is not a strategy, that is just absurd.

post #21 of 21

FIFY

Quote:

Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 

I will adjust the bindings on my own skis, but not my wife's skis.  There is no way that saving a few bucks is worth whatever grief I would get if it were even suspected that the bindings didn't release when they should or released when they shouldn't.

 

And I'm with Phil, hope is not a strategy, that is just absurd.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion