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Any recomendations for my 5 year old from the midwest?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

I have taken her skiing alot this season 6 times so far. I am a decent skier technique not greatest but trying to get her going at young age. We are doing some moderately sloped stuff at Perfect North Slopes. Longest run a little over mile in length. How is her technique compared to most five year olds? What can I do to help her other than just taking her out and let her have fun. She is better than most kids her age at our resort but I am sure bigger areas have better results than me. My goal is to take her out west in next two years. I will put a few videos below. Sorry no cool music and wind in background. I am not much of an editor.

 

 

 

 

post #2 of 22

Such fun skiing with a daughter. :)

 

Are you planning on teaching her yourself only?  Didn't have time to look at the video yet.

 

Food for thought . . . here's what I did for my daughter ages 4-7.  Full day ski school, 9:30-2:00, at Massanutten on two multi-day ski trips at age 4.  Essentially 3 lessons with other kids and good instructors with snack and lunch, plus another break and 1-2 runs with me to show off what she learned.  She is very social so liked being with other kids.  Second season we went the week before Christmas, plus a couple weekends.  One day at ski school each time, plus free skiing with me.  When she was six, she was able to ski the blacks at Mnut well.  We went to other ski areas in the southeast the next two seasons.  When she was 7 . . . a week at Alta.  No problem with blues with ski school.  Also confident enough to thoroughly powder off the edges with her instructor.

post #3 of 22
I see a little kid having fun GOING STRAIGHT with very little turning ability. Can she turn much? Can mom take the pictures while you go in front of her and make some steered wedge turns so she follows your path?

If you can't show her steered wedge turns--pointing both sets of toes in the direction you want to go--get her some lessons by someone who can.
post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

I see a little kid having fun GOING STRAIGHT with very little turning ability. Can she turn much? Can mom take the pictures while you go in front of her and make some steered wedge turns so she follows your path?

If you can't show her steered wedge turns--pointing both sets of toes in the direction you want to go--get her some lessons by someone who can.


@Kneale Brownson She can turn but she seems to want to just go straight she has a mind of her own. We have skied six times this season. On the first two she turned on the same runs. we had a couple week layoff for holidays and i went to keystone and now she has figured out she can control herself at high speed and doesn't want to turn. She doesn't seem to use her edges to turn much. Most of the turns use the inside edges on both skis. I think most of reason she doesn't turn is she is having fun with speeding down and feels like she can control it. I do not know how I can convince her otherwise lol. How much do I force the issue on this? On one hand I want her to improve and turn so she can go to bigger hills on other hand she is 5 and having a blast.

 

 

 

We ski at perfect north and unfortunately they do not offer a half day lesson program. I think I may splurge on a private hour lesson for $25 I just don't know if that would be enough. I missed out on the kids program they have.

 

@marznc My family does have a timeshare at Massanutten so I could get a week there when is a good time to go for snow conditions and having most of the resort open? What is the deal with the kids program I would like to take her. I think if we put 4-5 days in with the kids program she would improve.

 

 

I think as much as I want to have her improve I should probably only push so much and make sure to keep it fun.

 

 

Btw these are blue runs that she is going down.

post #5 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohioskier View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

I see a little kid having fun GOING STRAIGHT with very little turning ability. Can she turn much? Can mom take the pictures while you go in front of her and make some steered wedge turns so she follows your path?

If you can't show her steered wedge turns--pointing both sets of toes in the direction you want to go--get her some lessons by someone who can.


@Kneale Brownson She can turn but she seems to want to just go straight she has a mind of her own. We have skied six times this season. On the first two she turned on the same runs. we had a couple week layoff for holidays and i went to keystone and now she has figured out she can control herself at high speed and doesn't want to turn. She doesn't seem to use her edges to turn much. Most of the turns use the inside edges on both skis. I think most of reason she doesn't turn is she is having fun with speeding down and feels like she can control it. I do not know how I can convince her otherwise lol. How much do I force the issue on this? On one hand I want her to improve and turn so she can go to bigger hills on other hand she is 5 and having a blast.

 

 

 

We ski at perfect north and unfortunately they do not offer a half day lesson program. I think I may splurge on a private hour lesson for $25 I just don't know if that would be enough. I missed out on the kids program they have.

 

@marznc My family does have a timeshare at Massanutten so I could get a week there when is a good time to go for snow conditions and having most of the resort open? What is the deal with the kids program I would like to take her. I think if we put 4-5 days in with the kids program she would improve.

 

 

I think as much as I want to have her improve I should probably only push so much and make sure to keep it fun.

 

 

Btw these are blue runs that she is going down.

What I learned to do from the Mnut instructors when my daughter was five and not inclined to turn was 1) have her follow me, 2) play Red/Yellow/Green Light so that would have fun slowing down and stopping.  Keeping it fun also meant leaving while she was still wanting more.  2-3 hours at most.  We would ski in the morning, take a long lunch, then go back in the late afternoon.  She loved skiing under the lights.

 

For a private lesson, good to ask for an instructor with Child Specialist credentials.  Mnut has several.

 

My experience with my daughter and kids of my friends is that even 2 days in a row makes a big difference for kids.  At 5, I would say a day or two of ski school, with a day off afterwards is better.  For the week before Christmas, I did not put my daughter is ski school more than 3 days that week.  Since that was a slow week, I didn't have to make a decision early on so could take into account how she felt and snow/weather conditions.

 

Have you looked at the Unofficial Guide for Massanutten?  Let me know if you have any questions after reading it and checking out the Massanutten website.

post #6 of 22

I'm not from your area, but one thing we did last season w/ our 4 and 5 yo was to take a parent/child class. if this is not something that is available sign up for a private class or two w/ the understanding w/ the instructor that while your child is being instructed you get pointers/basics of what to do, say, etc. when skiing w/ your child on your own.

post #7 of 22

+1 for lessons.  When my daughter started, I signed us both up for private lessons in the same time slot.  She enjoyed the fact that I was trying to learn too, and it was fun to "compare notes" afterwards about what we learned.  

post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

I see a little kid having fun GOING STRAIGHT with very little turning ability. Can she turn much? Can mom take the pictures while you go in front of her and make some steered wedge turns so she follows your path?

If you can't show her steered wedge turns--pointing both sets of toes in the direction you want to go--get her some lessons by someone who can.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobQC View Post
 

+1 for lessons.  When my daughter started, I signed us both up for private lessons in the same time slot.  She enjoyed the fact that I was trying to learn too, and it was fun to "compare notes" afterwards about what we learned.  


Group lessons should be fun for a kid at that age (private lessons if you can afford it).  Tell her it is just like going to school, only it is a special ski school.  She has basic balance (not all kids that age can get "forward" so don't worry too much about it), but needs turning skills.  When kids have balance and no fear, they aren't too cold or tired, etc., they can learn quickly.  Now is the time to invest in lessons so she learns the skills that will be with her for a lifetime.  In a few years she might be into another sport or activity in the winter, so it would be great for her to learn the proper fundamentals while she is so young. Some kids can start young and some can't.  Your daughter can.

post #9 of 22

My two cents, ski school at least twice, then practice with kid.Make sure she always follows you, turns and ski in control

teach her the ethics as well. Most important for us with 3-5 yr old was to keep it fun, warm clothes and plenty of snacks.

 

Have a fun!

post #10 of 22
Thread Starter 

I took her yesterday and bought her a private lesson. She worked the turns we are figuring out that she likes speed and has a mind of her own. She has some talent. The ski instructor told me that she is not going to get anything out of the ski doodles program because she would be a level 6 of 6 of there ratings for the kids. She has encouraged me to send her through the race program next season. I do have her working turns she is starting to use her edges to make the turns. She is able to do the blue runs at the local resort no problem. She does make small turns going down the steep blues and can make wide sweeping turns down the moderate blues. I am just going to keep her going and let her develop every day I see something new she tries whether its making a jump or cutting through a tree. I think she has some natural ability I just want to keep it fun for her and allow her to grow in the sport. She does love it and thats fun.

post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohioskier View Post
 

I took her yesterday and bought her a private lesson. She worked the turns we are figuring out that she likes speed and has a mind of her own. She has some talent. The ski instructor told me that she is not going to get anything out of the ski doodles program because she would be a level 6 of 6 of there ratings for the kids. She has encouraged me to send her through the race program next season. I do have her working turns she is starting to use her edges to make the turns. She is able to do the blue runs at the local resort no problem. She does make small turns going down the steep blues and can make wide sweeping turns down the moderate blues. I am just going to keep her going and let her develop every day I see something new she tries whether its making a jump or cutting through a tree. I think she has some natural ability I just want to keep it fun for her and allow her to grow in the sport. She does love it and thats fun.

Good job, Dad!

 

Another game tactic to try is to have a little "competition" to see who can make more turns for a short section, say from where you are stopped to a landmark like a snow gun or big tree.  By next season, she'll undoubtedly mature more and be more likely to make turns without prompting.

 

Do you know the Green/Yellow/Red Light game?

 

Has your daughter asked for poles yet?  That's coming. :)  I got my daughter her own poles after she was tall enough that the shortest poles at the mountain's rental pool could fit.  She wanted them for the flats and lift line more than anything else.    Didn't argue after I took her to the rental shop and it was clear they didn't have anything short enough.  She didn't get to use them in ski school until age 6 or 7.  By that time, she was in the Blue group.  I was lucky that Massanutten can provide group instruction or full-day ski school at any ability level for kids up to age 12.  We lived too far away for the race/develop program to be practical.

post #12 of 22
Thread Starter 

Marz she has not asked for poles yet however she wants to hit terrain park and do tricks. I think if I wanted to I could take her on the blacks right now but I am holding off until she can carve the blues easily. She is only 5 lol. She does not wedge down steeps she goes for it and can handle speed. I am going to find her a qualified instructor somehow. I am only a second year skier and will not be able to get her to her potential. Why wait till next seasons race program if they think she is good enough now there will be a teacher for her somehow. Its amazing that I do not believe the staff can handle her ability I know they have protocol but I will not be sending the kid to learn to wedge lol.

 

Thanks for the kind words.

post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohioskier View Post
 

Marz she has not asked for poles yet however she wants to hit terrain park and do tricks. I think if I wanted to I could take her on the blacks right now but I am holding off until she can carve the blues easily. She is only 5 lol. She does not wedge down steeps she goes for it and can handle speed. I am going to find her a qualified instructor somehow. I am only a second year skier and will not be able to get her to her potential. Why wait till next seasons race program if they think she is good enough now there will be a teacher for her somehow. Its amazing that I do not believe the staff can handle her ability I know they have protocol but I will not be sending the kid to learn to wedge lol.

 

Thanks for the kind words.

Do you know about PSIA credentials?  While there are experienced instructors who have not gone through PSIA training and exams, asking for someone with PSIA qualifications is one way to find a good instructors without a specific recommendation.  Ideally, you want a Level 2 or Level 3 instructor.  Someone who also has done the Child Specialist stuff is even better.  A Level 1 instructor who is actively working towards Child Specialist and/or Level 2 could be just as good.  Especially if your daughter connects with the instructor.

 

You are doing the right thing to stay off blacks until her technique and inclination to make turns without prompting is that much more solid.

post #14 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thanks marz I definitely think someone level 2 or better with child specialty is important. I hope they have one at resort. I know the instructor I had seemed to be over her head in regards to wanting to push the kid on technique etc. It was really a waste of time. Worst case I will read up on technique and do it myself.....

post #15 of 22
Do not do it yourself. It may be fun for the 2 of you to take a private together.
post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohioskier View Post
 

Thanks marz I definitely think someone level 2 or better with child specialty is important. I hope they have one at resort. I know the instructor I had seemed to be over her head in regards to wanting to push the kid on technique etc. It was really a waste of time. Worst case I will read up on technique and do it myself.....

For a private, can be good to stop in and talk to the ski school Director in person.  Or at least the manager of the kids' program.  I know from experience at Mnut that the instructors who have only been around for few seasons are not always aware of the full capabilities of the ski school.

 

An older Level 1 instructor who is actively working towards passing the Level 2 exam can be quite good if they have 5+ years experience and interest in teaching kids.  Usually they are working part-time as an instructor and have full-time jobs, often they are parents themselves.  So they teach because they love it and want to improve their own skiing.

 

Remember that getting the basics down is helpful in the long run. But I completely understand that there is not much point to continue with a wedge/pizza.  Pretty sure my daughter was only being taught "french fries" in the Yellow group.  The progression at Mnut is Red (never-ever), Orange (novice and/or not quite strong enough because still young), then Yellow.  Her first skiing was the week before Christmas.  She was in Yellow by age 5 after doing Red at age 4 and Orange after skipping a day, another Orange on a weekend ski trip that first season, plus Orange the first ski day the next season in Dec.  Most of the other kids in Red and Yellow were at least a year or two older.

 

By the way, the only reason my daughter wasn't a better skier than me by age 12 is that I started really working on my technique with the help of Level 3 instructors around the time she was 10.  I'm retired so could take an extra trip out west on my own in addition to a spring break trip with her to Alta.  Became an advanced skier about five years ago.  We have friends who only take their kids to Alta for spring break.  They play ice hockey so picked up skiing fast with the help of Alta ski school.  Were just about as good as my daughter at the same ages even though she was skiing 10-15 days at Massanutten.  Good instructors can make a big difference in the amount of time needed to get kids going with solid technique.

post #17 of 22

@ohioskier : when you ask your daughter to follow you, does she make turns without really thinking about it?  Are you good enough to vary the size and speed of your turns on the local blue runs?

 

There was a point when my daughter knew how to turn at faster speeds, but didn't want to.  However, I was not too concerned because it was clear if she needed to turn to avoid a bump on the run or another skier, she did so easily and in complete control.  For her, she wanted to go fast straight down the steeper green run (very short) starting her third season, at age 6.  I remember watching her lap the run under the lights with her older cousin for about an hour.  The slope was pretty empty.  By then she was skiing the blue runs with me, including the slightly steeper one.

 

Last year, my friend 6yo son started on skis.  Picked up skiing very quickly because he plays ice hockey.  I had him follow me almost every run.  He was mature enough to follow carefully.  He did ski school several days over a few ski weekends, which also helped him develop good habits about turning vs going straight down.

post #18 of 22

There are two instructors listed in the EpicSki list.  Neither is posting that much in recent years, but you could PM them for a recommendation.

 

post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

@ohioskier : when you ask your daughter to follow you, does she make turns without really thinking about it?  Are you good enough to vary the size and speed of your turns on the local blue runs?

 

There was a point when my daughter knew how to turn at faster speeds, but didn't want to.  However, I was not too concerned because it was clear if she needed to turn to avoid a bump on the run or another skier, she did so easily and in complete control.  For her, she wanted to go fast straight down the steeper green run (very short) starting her third season, at age 6.  I remember watching her lap the run under the lights with her older cousin for about an hour.  The slope was pretty empty.  By then she was skiing the blue runs with me, including the slightly steeper one.

 

Last year, my friend 6yo son started on skis.  Picked up skiing very quickly because he plays ice hockey.  I had him follow me almost every run.  He was mature enough to follow carefully.  He did ski school several days over a few ski weekends, which also helped him develop good habits about turning vs going straight down.


Yes when she decides to turn on the greens and easier blues she can with ease. She can make slight turns on steeps and avoid people but she has her own thoughts on how to get down and does not make wide turns she likes to go straight down however she can avoid people easily and make adjustments. She learned to have to avoid the idiots we have a steep blue with that has three hills that connect at one section she is very good at staying away from the idiots that cant control themselves.

 

I am really not worried about her and I feel that she can go down the blacks if I decide to allow it I am holding her off. I want to work on her carving and using the hockey stop and edges to check her speed on the steeps. When she does that I will take her on blacks. She is working on those items and I can see improvement. I will contact the instructors listed and keep teaching her myself. I know that she will be beyond me soon and want to find someone to take her to her potential. I guess worst case is I continue myself until next season ski race program begins and I will put her in that.

post #20 of 22
Have you considered using turn shape to go the speed she chooses to go?
post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier31 View Post

Have you considered using turn shape to go the speed she chooses to go?


How would you do turn shape? I am open to considering anything really.

post #22 of 22

One way the Mnut instructors got the kids to practice hockey stops was to make it a game to spray the instructor.  Not the other kids in the class, only the instructor.  At least, not when the class was mainly kids under age 6.  The instructor would spray individual kids just enough to make it fun.

 

I trust you realize that carving and "hockey stops to check speed" are quite different approaches to controlling speed by turning.  Usually the term is "skidding" as opposed to carving.  I don't remember my daughter being taught specific carving skills until she was 7 or 8.  As long as she was doing parallel (french fry) turns and not wedging, that was sufficient.  The emphasis was on balance and keeping forward.

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