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Straight vs. super-sidecut technique? - Page 5

post #121 of 131
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the insights, I'll try to keep them in mind and review again before we head out!
post #122 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post

 

 

Do not, don't, never allow an instructor to show your wife a stem christie or wedge christie turn.  There is no good reason to show that and a very good reason to ski right past it without mentioning it...a stem is a hard habit to break.  If your wife is at all athletic, in her first day on the snow she'll progress from snowplow/wedge to an easy parallel.  She'll probably do some wedge christie turns on her way to a parallel turn, but don't mention it and do not let it become a habit.

 

 

 

Actually, do not, don't, never attempt to tell an instructor how to teach his lesson. There are very good reasons to show some students stems, just as there are very good reasons to skip it as well. Every skier uses a stem at times, its a tactic every skier needs to know, just like a wedge is a tactic every skier needs to know.

post #123 of 131

Freeski, 

 

SSG advised to "never allow". Technically that is a whole lot different than telling the instructor how to teach. :duck:

 

Our last SSD had a first time program he called Direct to Wedge. It was sort of like to direct to parallel except it started in a wedge. Very much like what SSG describes above. Given the frequency that stems are taught to beginners in the real world combined with the frequency of a spouse "supervising" a lesson, this is all really a moot point.

post #124 of 131
Thread Starter 
I really don't have any intent to supervise. I might take a lesson myself the first morning to get smart on the new skis & techniques.
post #125 of 131

I just did a little test on straight vs modern skis last night. I have to say there is a huge advantage in modern skis, even for an old timer on my old "favs"  The Olin Comp4's were noodles that cut short turns easily, but tended to hook with modern technique, requiring a lot of thigh strength to shift weight to the tails at the end and then back forward. Also the "carved turn" was loud, slow, and seemed like it came from the middle half of the ski, with the edge chopping into the hardback rather than slicing cleanly.  Yes I could ski with them, but it was work and took more concentration with every turn.  ON soft snow they were almost as good as modern skis, but still a bit fussy, a bit more work.

 

The only plus: they cut into ice better than anything, and the rough carve slowed me down on steep icy pitches, but I was happier with modern skis despite a little more edge inclination needed to cut into ice. 

 

 I'm going to retire the Olins for good finally, and maybe I should change my screen name to "Quicksteady". 

post #126 of 131
Thread Starter 
Well, after a day and a half on my new K2 Threes, I guess I'm diggin' them. I meant to sign my wife and I up for lessons yesterday but she was all "eeeh, I can figure this out myself." She did pretty well, but did spend a lot of time on her butt, too. Today... lessons for sure.

WRT the Threes... I feel like I'm catching my edges more than I used to on straight skis; not sure about that. My muscles are trying to repeat what they're used to doing.

Of course, I cracked my 20 year old boots going off a jump... so now I'm in rental boots. tongue.gif

On the plus side, they have had almost record snowfall here... 36" in the last week and about 20" of that since our arrival. Yesterday the winds were KICKING but today it's supposed to be a thin overcast, occasional flurries, and light breezes. Perfect!
post #127 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaimeZX View Post

Well, after a day and a half on my new K2 Threes, I guess I'm diggin' them. I meant to sign my wife and I up for lessons yesterday but she was all "eeeh, I can figure this out myself." She did pretty well, but did spend a lot of time on her butt, too. Today... lessons for sure.

WRT the Threes... I feel like I'm catching my edges more than I used to on straight skis; not sure about that. My muscles are trying to repeat what they're used to doing.

Of course, I cracked my 20 year old boots going off a jump... so now I'm in rental boots. tongue.gif

On the plus side, they have had almost record snowfall here... 36" in the last week and about 20" of that since our arrival. Yesterday the winds were KICKING but today it's supposed to be a thin overcast, occasional flurries, and light breezes. Perfect!

 

you are funny. K2 threes are barely shaped and sloppy design compared to anything made recently. 

 

I am sure some bear has soemthing for you for next to nothing that is way better than what you have. If this was last year I would have given you are pair of blizzard 8.7 Mags

post #128 of 131
I'm with Josh on this one. The whole thing seems like an exercise in "How can I put a lot of time, conversation, and thought into being able to tell myself I'm doing this, without actually doing it?"
post #129 of 131

Going by dimensions found on the web and Physicman's Radius Calculator, he has about a 22 m radius ski, hardly 'barely shaped'. That is a lot more sidecut than his previous skis which are somewhere above 50 m radius at the least. I can't speak to the nebulous 'sloppy design'.

 

He is making movement in the 'desired' direction and he is enjoying the skis. FWIW, I think anyone would be better suited with something with a 80 - 90 mm waist unless they plan to carve all day long on hard pack.

 

JaimeZX, describe how your edges are catching. BTW, where are you skiing?

post #130 of 131
Thread Starter 
This was two full, and two half-days at Snowshoe, WV over the long weekend. (Friday afternoon / Saturday / Sunday / Monday morning.)

I did sign up for a lesson to work on the "new-style" technique but was annoyed when the two groups they had lessons for were the "totally new at this" and "already took the totally new at this." So the instructor spent 95% of his time keeping kids from falling over and then offering me a pointer here and there. Which is okay but I could've gotten that here from you guys for free. If I'd known what it was going to be I would've sprung for a private lesson I guess.

Anyway, I worked a lot on steering by leaning my knees and trying to skid less through turns, and that seemed pretty cool; but I would've preferred to have an instructor take me through some good moguls or at least down a steeper slope to critique my style there... But anyway, it seems like I tended to catch my edge when in snow where it was maybe 2" of loose stuff on top of packed snow. Unfortunately it didn't happen often enough where I could say "oh, it always happens when X." But it was always sort of startling and would throw me off my rhythm pretty good for about 15 seconds.

Guess that's not much to go on.

Overall I like the new skis I suppose; if they last me a few years so much the better, and next time I can move into something all y'all would consider truly modern. Meanwhile I got lots of compliments on my "retro" equipment. Which I thought was hilarious. smile.gif
post #131 of 131

I'd like to offer some hard earned wisdom from my own experiences.

 

First of all, there is no better way to kill a relationship than to try to teach your significant other how to ski.  

 

Second, if you are worried about her holding you back, get her into a lesson, and you can go take a few runs and get it out of your system for an hour or two, and then spend the rest of the day with her.  She will also progress much faster with a good lesson and be able to move off the bunny hill sooner.

 

Third, throw away your old straight skis and don't look back.  If you just can't throw them away, you can hang them on the wall or make them into a cool looking Adirondack chair or something.  I was a second string ski racer all through high school (mid to late 90s when shape skis were new).  I worked harder than most of the guys racing first string, put in the time, and took it very seriously.  I wanted to race, and I did everything I could to improve.  I just never got that good while I was in high school.  The reason was that while my teammates were all skiing on modern equipment, I was still skiing straight skis.    

 

A year after high school, I gave in to the pressures of a changing ski industry, and purchased new "shaped" skis.  I saw my technique and abilities change overnight to where I wanted it to be in high school.  Had I done it sooner, there is no doubt in my mind that I would have been racing first string.  Do yourself a favor and move to modern skis.  Give them a day to get used to them, and from there on, you won't regret it.  

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