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New Boots

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Hey guys, so I've taken the advice of some here on the board and started looking for my first pair of ski boots. I went to the local ski shop (which is the ONLY ski shop I have within 110 miles) to see what they had in stock. There selection wasn't large by any means, but they seem to have some decent boots. The ones that seemed to work the best for me were the Rossignol Alias Sensor 120.

 

 

The main "boot fitter" was occupied at the time so I didn't get to talk to him much. The boot seemed to fit well, but I don't think I was used to the stiffness of the boot. I have always rented my boots, and I am assuming that rental boots are generally not this stiff. I tried to find reviews online of this boot, but I really couldn't find any personal reviews.

 

I have two separate questions. 1- Has anyone heard anything about this particular boot (good or bad). 2- Would it be a bad idea to buy the boot without getting properly "fit", and if I do that, would I be able to get "fit" once I get out west?

post #2 of 18

Any boot is "good" or "bad" depending on how it fits your foot.  

Stiffness might make things difficult if you are learning so a 120 is not especially advisable.

 

Definitely have a proper fitter set you up in your boot, it could be your local shop, or at your destination, don't just go buying a boot on advice from nonprofessional boot fitters ie, a friend who knows about ski gear.

 

Advantages of your local shop is an ongoing relationship this will likely be much less expensive, the destination shop is more choices and expertise with more cost.

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buttinski View Post
 

Any boot is "good" or "bad" depending on how it fits your foot.  

Stiffness might make things difficult if you are learning so a 120 is not especially advisable.

 

Definitely have a proper fitter set you up in your boot, it could be your local shop, or at your destination, don't just go buying a boot on advice from nonprofessional boot fitters ie, a friend who knows about ski gear.

 

Advantages of your local shop is an ongoing relationship this will likely be much less expensive, the destination shop is more choices and expertise with more cost.

I won't be learning in my new boot, I will just have to adjust to a new boot. I would say I'm an advanced skier who has always used rental equipment, and now that I can afford my own boots, I want to invest.

 

Would you advise not to buy the boots here in town and just wait until I get to Colorado? Or should I buy here and if needed, make adjustments in Colorado?

post #4 of 18

If you don't get the feeling they really know what they are doing I'd wait till you head out west.  Last thing you want to do is buy boots you are not confident with.  

post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by voghan View Post

If you don't get the feeling they really know what they are doing I'd wait till you head out west.  Last thing you want to do is buy boots you are not confident with.  

Do you think I will have to pay significantly more in Colorado than I would at the local shop?
post #6 of 18

Given that we know nothing about your "local" shop nor what kind of boots you might end up with if you buy in Colorado, there isn't any way to answer that.  You might pay more buying from Jeff Bergeron but you would also get the services of a well-respected fitter.  If you buy boots from your local shop and have to have work done to them in Colorado you will have to pay for that.  If you buy the boots from your local shop, which may or may not have a skilled fitter you might end up in boots that are 1-2 sizes too big.  Too big cannot be fixed, too small can almost always be fixed.  If you buy from a real fitter in Colorado and you develop a hot spot on the side of your foot, you can get it fixed right away by that fitter and it won't cost anything.

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by UTVols View Post

 

I have two separate questions. 1- Has anyone heard anything about this particular boot (good or bad). 2- Would it be a bad idea to buy the boot without getting properly "fit", and if I do that, would I be able to get "fit" once I get out west?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by UTVols View Post

Do you think I will have to pay significantly more in Colorado than I would at the local shop?

 

I think you're asking the wrong questions. Change the paradigm: you're looking for a good boot fitter to sell you performance, fit and comfort. The boot is merely the end result of that process. Find a good boot fitter and they will guide you towards the proper size, flex, brand and model of boot. Doing it in reverse by choosing a boot first and then taking it to a boot fitter seldom leads to good results. Going to a shop and buying a boot from a sales person who is not going to properly fit you to a boot seldom leads to good results.

 

Fitting into a boot is a process and it can take time. After the initial fit you want to go out and ski in them. Only after a few hours skiing in them will any problems with the fit or alignment etc. become manifest, which means going back to the boot fitter for an adjustment. I just bought a new pair of boots last month and it took about 5 days of skiing to get them completely dialed in. I recommend getting boots fit at a place where it will be possible to easily go back and forth between skiing and the shop.

 

Resources that might help:

 

http://www.epicski.com/a/boot-fitting-which-boot-will-work-for-me

 

http://www.njicle.com/viewprogram.aspx?catid=2097&progid=8798

post #8 of 18

I don't see how you concluded that it "seemed to fit well", after only having worn rental boots before. If you just tried on a few boots to see which were comfy, then I doubt that it actually fit your foot well. Also, a 120 boot sounds stiff for someone that has only ever rented boots - unless you're over 200 pounds. A stiff boot can be softened though. Usually a good boot fitter looks at your bare feet to assess width, volume, lumps, etc. before even suggesting a boot model and size to try on.

post #9 of 18

UT - Are you willing to risk buying boots that you will replace in one or two seasons?  I was like you, I went to a shop and bought the boots they fitted me in.  The guy only showed me one pair and insisted this was the pair for me.  Those boots are now too big and too soft for me.  So I spent $199 on a pair of boots I'll use for two season and be buying a new pair soon.  I'm 6'2", over 200 pounds and ski about 20 times a year yet I got placed in 50 flex boots by a guy at a reputable shop in town.  At least you where smart enough to come online and validate your purchase.  I've researched the shop I intend to go to and have a good idea on what I plan to ask when I get in there.

post #10 of 18

Agree with much of the above.  Good fitting boots are most import part of all of your ski equipment.  If a shop has limited choices, then I stay away because there is often a tendency to make what they have fit you, rather than finding what meets your needs the best.  Did the fitter do a shell fit?  How much room is there behind your heal with your foot in the shell and toes lightly touching the end of the boot?  How much room is there in t your fore-foot in the shell?  Ccomfort in the store does not always equate to a good fitting or good skiing boot - sounds wrong but is often true, especially when the boot is too big.  Go back to the store and meet with the boot-fitter, assuming that he is really a trained fitter and get a second opinion.  Or research a good fitter where you are going, get boots and give some time for the fitter to work with your feet and the boots. 

post #11 of 18

Read about shell fitting (checking the fit with the liner out of the boot). New ski boots properly fitted will be tight in the store--it takes about 5 days for the liner to pack out--and unless you're experienced with boots it can be very hard for you to tell if a new boot fits properly. The biggest mistake people make is getting boots that are too large. A good fitter will know what boots fit your particlular kind of foot--not just make but also model, since different models of the same maker may have different volumes, and he will shell fit you to make sure you are in the proper size. The fitting process also involves fixing sore spots and otherwise correcting fit problems that may show up--many shops will do this for free for a year. Ideally you buy the boots from an experienced fitter in a place you'll be going back to. What to do if there isn't a good fitter in a place you'll be going back to--that's easy--move to a ski town. 

 

The boot you are looking at sounds like it was designed for a comfort fit--it was built around a 104mm last which is quite wide. If you have a wide fat foot it might be a good boot for you. It might be on the stiff side for you, but generally a stiff boot can be softened, so I wouldn't worry too much about that. 

 

Here's one site that discusses fitting boots yourself, if you're not confident about the shop in your town and don't want to wait until you get to Colorado.

http://www.evo.com/ski-boot-fitting-guide-how-to-try-on-your-new-ski-boots.aspx 

post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by UTVols View Post


Do you think I will have to pay significantly more in Colorado than I would at the local shop?

Most likely not - most will make adjustments for no charge once you buy the boot.  The difference is short money when you are 1,000+ miles away, at bottom of a couple thousand foot high mountain, great conditions, spent money on your vacation and your feet hurt or boots too big.  

 

I will say that depending on your size the selection might be lower, but you can also find last years shells too for less money.  Shell fit is one factor - ive been in boots that shell fit fine but either too low of an instep (Salomon Falcon) and ones with higher instep but too much volume across the heel/ankle (Lange RX LV's) - id wait, but thats just me.  Also, it has also been my experience that boots that fit "good" for Sugar or Beech might not fit good enough when the pitch goes up and the snow gets 3D.  I'd wait - just $0.02 YMMV

post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 

Alright guys, getting yall's input has been very helpful. I have decided to wait until I get to Breckenridge to buy a new pair of boots. My next question is where to go when I get there. I know Jeff Bergeron at boot fixation is one place, but what about any others. I would really like to get my boots the night I get there so I dont have to waste any possible mountain time. I wont be getting into Breck until about 8 so I know that may be out of the question. Our trip is only three skiable days so I want to use as much time possible on the mtn.

 

Thanks for your continued help and patience!!

post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by UTVols View Post
 

Alright guys, getting yall's input has been very helpful. I have decided to wait until I get to Breckenridge to buy a new pair of boots. My next question is where to go when I get there. I know Jeff Bergeron at boot fixation is one place, but what about any others. I would really like to get my boots the night I get there so I dont have to waste any possible mountain time. I wont be getting into Breck until about 8 so I know that may be out of the question. Our trip is only three skiable days so I want to use as much time possible on the mtn.

 

Thanks for your continued help and patience!!

I don't that particular shop or any others in the State of Colorado, but based on how things are here (Tahoe) I wonder if you should have an appointment made ahead of time. Most shops seem to open at 8 if not earlier, so if you were able to get an 8 am appointment you might not lose too much time.

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

I wonder if you should have an appointment made ahead of time.

 

+1

 

Not all shops cater to all levels of skiers and price points. A good boot fitting can take time - over an hour if there are problems to solve. Calling ahead to ask questions and discuss your needs will save everybody time. What kind of skier you are, foot length/width, $ budget etc..

post #16 of 18

You're flying across the country to ski for 3 days?  Wow!

 

If you want to work with a good boot fitter, you absolutely need to make an appointment; I think I've stated that at least once.  Whether or not you can go see a fitter at 8pm is another issue.

post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 
What do you guys think of the "Surefoot" boot fitting process?
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by UTVols View Post

What do you guys think of the "Surefoot" boot fitting process?


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