or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Full tilt ski boot.What do you think?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Full tilt ski boot.What do you think?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mDhgb12QsE

 

Any experience? What you think in general?

You can't lean on your tongue anymore right?

post #2 of 23

They do make different flex tongues. But in the end it's more if the boot is for you. That particular model seemed to fit me well enough, but I did not end up in it because something felt not quite right.

post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 

But you are saying its not a gimmick. It actually works?

Also if I choose hard stiffness whats the point of this compared to regular ones?

 

Another question. Arent you prune more to foot injuries in this? Your foot is protected less no?

post #4 of 23

I skied the original (narrower) design for some time and liked it except it was tight in the toe box. It was easy to get off and on. It was warm.  It did offer a slightly different flex pattern. The forward flex was smoother than a conventional boot with more total forward flex. I found I stayed more balanced in the middle with less pressure fore or aft. Read the reviews in various magazines. The flex pattern hasn't changed much in 20 years. It's still the favorite of a number of big mountain skiers but is obviously not everyone's cup of tea.

post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwerty53 View Post
 

But you are saying its not a gimmick. It actually works?

Also if I choose hard stiffness whats the point of this compared to regular ones?

 

Another question. Arent you prune more to foot injuries in this? Your foot is protected less no?


You do realize that it was a clear plastic shell right?

post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwerty53 View Post
 

But you are saying its not a gimmick. It actually works?  Bill Johnson wore the Raichle Flexon when he won the Gold Medal in downhill at the 1984 Olympics.  The Full Tilt Classic uses the same mold as the Raichle Flexon.  So no, the Full Tilt is not a gimmick.

 

Also if I choose hard stiffness whats the point of this compared to regular ones?  I don't have Full Tilts but have a Dalbello 3 piece, 3 buckle boot which is similar.  This design is much easier to put on and, more importantly for me, to take off as I no longer have blood on my insteps after removing my boots.  The flex pattern is more linear in a 3 piece boot than in a 2 piece and some people like that while others do not.

 

Another question. Arent you prune more to foot injuries in this? Your foot is protected less no?  What makes you think your foot is more prone to injury.  I know several people who use Full Tilts and none of them have injured their feet.

post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post
 


You do realize that it was a clear plastic shell right?

I had to watch the video twice because at first it looked like an Apex sort of boot.  The second time through I could see the edges of the shell but man, that shell is really transparent.:eek

post #8 of 23

Comes in two widths, many different stiffnesses, has a moldable liner, is warm, and the lightest regular alpine boot made.  What's not do like?

 

Between the original Flexons and my current Full Tilts, I've skied on them for 19 years, and I'm one of the fastest skiers at Crystal Mtn.

 

I'm puzzled why anyone chooses a different boot (assuming they're in the market for a regular alpine boot).

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.

post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crudmaster View Post
 

Comes in two widths, many different stiffnesses, has a moldable liner, is warm, and the lightest regular alpine boot made.  What's not do like?

 

Between the original Flexons and my current Full Tilts, I've skied on them for 19 years, and I'm one of the fastest skiers at Crystal Mtn.

 

I'm puzzled why anyone chooses a different boot (assuming they're in the market for a regular alpine boot).

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.

Which one you recommend for intermediate.

 

And whats the difference between freestyle and all mountain?

post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwerty53 View Post

Which one you recommend for intermediate.

And whats the difference between freestyle and all mountain?

Nobody here can recommend a specific boot for you. Everyone's feet are different, the FT's come in either a 99mm or 102mm last(width) and you might not even like how they feel. If you're really interested in them you need to find a dealer and try them on.

The difference is that the freestyle has a rubber boot board and the all mountain has a hard boot board.
post #11 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post


Nobody here can recommend a specific boot for you. Everyone's feet are different, the FT's come in either a 99mm or 102mm last(width) and you might not even like how they feel. If you're really interested in them you need to find a dealer and try them on.

The difference is that the freestyle has a rubber boot board and the all mountain has a hard boot board.


yes I noticed. But practically what is the difference if I am going to do groomed mostly 99%.

post #12 of 23

The rubber boot board is supposed to provide shock absorption for landings.  If you don't plan to be doing any jumps, flips, etc you don't need it but it wouldn't cause you any problems if you had it.

post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwerty53 View Post
 


yes I noticed. But practically what is the difference if I am going to do groomed mostly 99%.

The difference does not matter, stop shopping for boots on the internet, go to a reputable fitter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by crudmaster View Post
 

Comes in two widths, many different stiffnesses, has a moldable liner, is warm, and the lightest regular alpine boot made.  What's not do like?

 

Between the original Flexons and my current Full Tilts, I've skied on them for 19 years, and I'm one of the fastest skiers at Crystal Mtn.

 

I'm puzzled why anyone chooses a different boot (assuming they're in the market for a regular alpine boot).

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.

Fit? Function? My ankle actually does not flex well with them for some reason. I'm in a 3 buckle boot, but it's Nordica.

post #14 of 23

Backstory...

 

post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by crudmaster View Post

Comes in two widths, many different stiffnesses, has a moldable liner, is warm, and the lightest regular alpine boot made.  What's not do like?

Between the original Flexons and my current Full Tilts, I've skied on them for 19 years, and I'm one of the fastest skiers at Crystal Mtn.

I'm puzzled why anyone chooses a different boot (assuming they're in the market for a regular alpine boot).

 



_____________________________________________________________________________________



How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.


Quote:
Originally Posted by crudmaster View Post

Comes in two widths, many different stiffnesses, has a moldable liner, is warm, and the lightest regular alpine boot made.  What's not do like?

Between the original Flexons and my current Full Tilts, I've skied on them for 19 years, and I'm one of the fastest skiers at Crystal Mtn.

I'm puzzled why anyone chooses a different boot (assuming they're in the market for a regular alpine boot).

 



_____________________________________________________________________________________



How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.





Because they might want less ramp angle and forward lean, or might not have foot volume commensurate to the boot, or they might have alignment issues that a full tilt can't resolve, or....
post #16 of 23

What people are saying is that getting the right boot is complicated, more than you can imagine.  

Getting the wrong boot is so much more simple.  But you pay in poor performance.

If you go buy another set of boots to get better performance, it costs you extra money too.

 

To get that right boot, you need a guide whom you trust, who is in addition trustworthy, and who is looking right at your actual foot.  

That would be a qualified bootfitter.  The best thing you can do is find a good bootfitter, not find a good boot.


Tell where you are and you might get some good recommendations.

post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 
Boston Taxatusets.
post #18 of 23

This is the closest fitter to you who sometimes posts here.

 

Phil Burgess
Ski Stop
256 Washington St
Westwood Ma. 02090
(781)329-3616
phil@skistopmass.com
www.skistopmass.com

 

There may be other qualified fitters in the immediate Boston area so you may get recommendations from others on here.  The main thing is do not go to a big box sporting goods store and expect there to be even one person who knows how to fit boots, in fact the people selling skis and boots may not even ski.


Edited by mtcyclist - 1/17/14 at 4:14pm
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post



Because they might want less ramp angle and forward lean, or might not have foot volume commensurate to the boot, or they might have alignment issues that a full tilt can't resolve, or....

 

 

Yikes!  Perhaps I'm just lucky that things are much more simple for me.

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.

post #20 of 23
Lesson 1, never assume ones personal gear choices will work for everyone else. If they did, how'd we recognize anyone in the lift line?smile.gif
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwerty53 View Post
 

But you are saying its not a gimmick. It actually works?

Also if I choose hard stiffness whats the point of this compared to regular ones?

 

Another question. Arent you prune more to foot injuries in this? Your foot is protected less no?


I am currently using FT Full Chair, the stiffest boot in their 2013 model range (10 flex or so).

 

The only problem I had with them was too little space in the toe box. My local bootfitter managed to fix it by adding volume to the inside of the Intuition liners that came with the boots.

post #22 of 23

When moulding inner boots it is always necessary to tape thin objects onto the foot in order to create space inside the boot in the locations that shouldn't be squeezed, such as toes and those protruding ankle bones.  I also think it's wise, in order to maintain a good fitting boot as long as possible, to attach little, shaped, THIN, tapered things on both sides-- laterally-- of the ball of your foot so that 2-4 years later, when the innner boot "packs out" (its thickness shrinks, really), you aren't squeezed too much there.

 

These space-buidling techniques mean that, initially at least, the boot's pressure will distributed all over the foot except the 5 or 10 percent of the area that is vulnerable, in the long run, to pressure points.

 

Amazingly, not all boot fitters bother with this level of preparation of the foot.

 

With these methods I got 7 years of maintenance-free comfort out of a 1996-vintage Intuition liner.

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

How well you are able to ski is related to how hard you are willing to fall.

post #23 of 23
A good shop will do exactly what crudmaster said. That said, I loath full tilts. I could do them with a bunch of boot shop gymnastics, but even then, I just don't like how they ski, the angles, not to mention some alignment issues that a full tilt won't resolve. Everybody else's mileage will certainly vary wildly.
Edited by markojp - 1/18/14 at 10:44pm
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Full tilt ski boot.What do you think?