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What makes a good bump ski for ordinary citizens? - Page 2

post #31 of 59

I have yellow pants, too?

post #32 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

I have yellow pants, too?

Still :eek

post #33 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

Still :eek

They are also a little gray

post #34 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

Still :eek

They are also a little gray

 

I've noticed that happening to me, too.

post #35 of 59
I have yellow pants as well.

Maybe I can borrow KevinF's jacket and look like a banana for a couple of runs.
post #36 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drahtguy View Post

I have yellow pants as well.

Maybe I can borrow KevinF's jacket and look like a banana for a couple of runs.

Which TheSki will you choose for the Yellow Pants run?

post #37 of 59

I will loan him the DPS 112s ... 

post #38 of 59
I'd go with the black 185. They would be the stem.
post #39 of 59

Just skied with instructor Kevin today, who was a freestyle dude back in the day. He remembered The Ski, of course, although he mentioned a couple of other major skis that were also popular for that crowd and I can't remember - was there one called the Prix? I told him I was getting the new The Ski for bumps; he was pretty enthused until I told him it was 89 underfoot, at which point of course it was obvious it wasn't anything like the original. But I think he'll go on a trip through memory lane with the topsheet graphics.

 

Oh. Oh wait, I have a problem.  I always put stickers all over my skis to make it really obvious they're mine, and as a really low bar theft deterrent.  But - I assume doing this to The Ski is sacrilegious.  What shall I do?? (Especially if there are at least two yellow pairs at A Basin, which is possible with @Trekchick there.)

post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

Just skied with instructor Kevin today, who was a freestyle dude back in the day. He remembered The Ski, of course, although he mentioned a couple of other major skis that were also popular for that crowd and I can't remember - was there one called the Prix? I told him I was getting the new The Ski for bumps; he was pretty enthused until I told him it was 89 underfoot, at which point of course it was obvious it wasn't anything like the original. But I think he'll go on a trip through memory lane with the topsheet graphics.

 

Oh. Oh wait, I have a problem.  I always put stickers all over my skis to make it really obvious they're mine, and as a really low bar theft deterrent.  But - I assume doing this to The Ski is sacrilegious.  What shall I do?? (Especially if there are at least two yellow pairs at A Basin, which is possible with @Trekchick there.)

It may be acceptable for you to put some kind of tiny sticker but DO NOT cover up the simple graphics!!!

post #41 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

I've heard horror stories about metal in bumps. Is that more for the hard charger zipper line folks, or is metal best avoided for a day in the bumps, especially if one hopes to become more aggressive over time?

 

 

The Head Rev 85 has metal, but it is also an awesome bump ski, which is one reason I bought them.  It's also easy to vary the turn radius, which makes it great in bumps when you're not just doing zipper lines or when the bumps are unevenly spaced and sized.  

post #42 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post
 

Any thoughts on the Fischer Watea 94 for bumps? They seem soft and playful but I'm not good enough to tell if they make a difference compared to others in my quiver.

 

I thought the Watea 94's were great in the bumps, also the Watea 98 (now the Big Stix 98/100).  They are indeed as playful a ski as I have tried, I love the light weight.   Caveat: not necessarily for icy bumps.  The Watea series isn't as great on hardpack, whereas the Motive series is better balanced for both hard and soft snow. 

post #43 of 59

Good thread on metal and bending skis, new vs old:

http://www.epicski.com/t/117699/can-you-bend-new-skis-with-metal-like-the-blizzard-cochise

 

That question got me wondering.  I used to bend a lot of skis, but not so much any more.  Is it me, or the skis that changed?  Sounds like probably both...

post #44 of 59

So much bad information in this thread, besides the discussion on yellow pants it is pretty much all bad. 

post #45 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by iceage View Post
 

So much bad information in this thread, besides the discussion on yellow pants it is pretty much all bad. 

 

Thank you for posting this, it too was a great addition to the thread. :rolleyes

post #46 of 59

 

 

 

 


Edited by segbrown - 3/1/14 at 8:23pm
post #47 of 59
I have never heard that a stiff carving/slalom skis is the best option for bumps. From research and personal experience i have come to beleive that soft, narrowish skis with modest to little sidecut are best. Others?
post #48 of 59

I love that picture of RachelV.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by eastern-bunny View Post

I have never heard that a stiff carving/slalom skis is the best option for bumps. From research and personal experience i have come to beleive that soft, narrowish skis with modest to little sidecut are best. Others?

 

Did anyone say anything in this thread that contradicts that point of view?

post #49 of 59
Huh? I was responding to the original entry that stated a stiff slalom skis was best for bumps according to conventional wisdom. Was your response necessary?
post #50 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastern-bunny View Post

Huh? I was responding to the original entry that stated a stiff slalom skis was best for bumps according to conventional wisdom. Was your response necessary?


Well, yes, it was necessary.  I hadn't remembered stiff slalom skis being part of the discussion, and now you have explained that it was.  Right there in the OP. I see it now.

post #51 of 59

I want to know how you keep all those yellow pants clean.   :rolleyes

 

I'm about ready to switch back to black or gray.  I've already had to wash my orange pants twice this year... and that nikwash stuff is pricy!

post #52 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

I want to know how you keep all those yellow pants clean.   :rolleyes

 

I'm about ready to switch back to black or gray.  I've already had to wash my orange pants twice this year... and that nikwash stuff is pricy!

 

We have to wash our pants???:D

post #53 of 59

Yellow pants are not clean. Unless you don't use them.

post #54 of 59

I saw someone Sunday wearing bright yellow pants but with sort of a thin linear camo design (like twigs) on them, brown maybe. Brilliant. Excellent way to hide car filth.

post #55 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

I want to know how you keep all those yellow pants clean.   :rolleyes

 

I'm about ready to switch back to black or gray.  I've already had to wash my orange pants twice this year... and that nikwash stuff is pricy!

 

Black isn't much better.  Everytime, I lean against my car to get stuff out/in, they are filthy.

post #56 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmr40 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

I want to know how you keep all those yellow pants clean.   :rolleyes

 

I'm about ready to switch back to black or gray.  I've already had to wash my orange pants twice this year... and that nikwash stuff is pricy!

 

Black isn't much better.  Everytime, I lean against my car to get stuff out/in, they are filthy.

 

I have both insanely bright yellow and black, as well as a swirly pastel and another that's burnt orange. I promise you, black gets just as filthy, but it's not nearly as visible.

post #57 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

For a bump ski, I would look for something with fairly minimal sidecut, fairly minimal (or zero) early rise/rocker tip and tail.  Mid flex, maybe on the soft side of mid flex (like the BW).  The BW is a pretty good choice (as is the Magnum 8.5ti: a little stiffer, but the tail works well in bumps, as there is fairly generous flex in the tail).  

Another awesome bump ski that is an all-mountain ski: the Head Rock n' Roll. 95mm underfoot, no metal, super low early tip and tail rise, great flex pattern.  This is probably the best ski in bumps I have been on over 85mm.  Actually, the newer REV series (85/90/98) all fit that mold well.  

Lots of rocker/early rise is not what you want in bumps.  Minimal is OK, but add too much, and things can feel unpredictable.  Better to have a traditional camber ski or close to it, not too stiff.   

Great recommendation, Dawg! I have always found your reviews extremely informative, particularly as we are very close in build and skiing style. So, I simply had to look into the Rock'n Rolls. Being a discontinued ski, there are only a few pairs left around the internet, and only at or below 173 cm. Of course, the closeout pricing to be found only made them all the more interesting. I bought a pair at 166, the lower end of my range, and got them out at Mammoth last weekend. In a word: WOW! They excel at everything, at least everything I want to do on a mid fat ski. They carve trenches on the groomers, there's a YouTube video of Mr. PMTS doing just that. They motor (sorry, couldn't resist) through 4 day old Sierra cement that could only be charitably called crud. And they rock in the bumps, which is, after all, why I posted the initial inquiry in this thread. What I particularly liked was how I could feather the edge in and out on steeps, like Mammoth's Avalanche Chutes, to point them at just the right bump to turn on. For that, they are very confidence inspiring.

They are so versatile, in fact, that I'm seriously thinking about selling both my Bushwackers and Bonafides. They are as good or better in bumps as the BWs: 166 vs 173 certainly doesn't hurt there. But, they don't give up anything to the BW's greater length: If they have a speed limit, I haven't found it. And not for lack of trying. They give up just a smidgen to the Bonafides in crud, but I shouldn't be skiing crud that fast on either ski anyway. Move over Gotamas: I have a new all-time favorite ski. And they are joining you in the traveling quiver.

Sorry @bounceswoosh, I just wanted to nudge this thread back on subject wink.gif
Edited by cosmoliu - 4/12/14 at 3:55pm
post #58 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

I do not think anyone truly thinks stiff SL type skis are the best in bumps.

 

the bushwacker is a great choice its the best no twin tipped/non bump ski I have tried, some twins I have tried have been even better. Your last paragraph is spot on.

do you think that the bushwhacker is much softer than a Kendo or a Prophet? Flex ratings aside and all.  I know you commented on another thread about adding to my quiver and this may be a great option.  Minor hijack.  sorry guys

post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by thekidd326 View Post
 

do you think that the bushwhacker is much softer than a Kendo or a Prophet? Flex ratings aside and all.  I know you commented on another thread about adding to my quiver and this may be a great option.  Minor hijack.  sorry guys

The Bushwacker is definitely softer than the Kendo.  Not sure about the Prophet. 

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