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Rub-on after a hot wax?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hey all,

 

I was wondering if rubbing on wax between hot waxes would improve the duration of a hot wax. I send my skis as needed (usually every 4-5 ski days) into the shop for a hot wax, and when it comes back, I rub on some Swix F4 (the paste form that comes in a two-sided bottle). I also rub on the Swix F4 after each ski day. Do any of you guys do this? Do you think that it preserves the hot wax longer (longer time until white patches show)?

post #2 of 7
Usally rub on's ski off in a run or two.

If your serious and your skis, invest in the tools and do your own tuning and waxing. Once you get a area set up and have the proper tools, it doesn't take long and your skis will alway have a great tune and last longer.

My Volkl Kendo's have over 90 day's on them and have never been to a shop. My AC40's have about 150 day's on them have been ground twice and still ski great, have lots of camber and lots of metal edge left.
post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoloBlizzard View Post
 

Hey all,

 

I was wondering if rubbing on wax between hot waxes would improve the duration of a hot wax. I send my skis as needed (usually every 4-5 ski days) into the shop for a hot wax, and when it comes back, I rub on some Swix F4 (the paste form that comes in a two-sided bottle). I also rub on the Swix F4 after each ski day. Do any of you guys do this? Do you think that it preserves the hot wax longer (longer time until white patches show)?


Sure it will help.  Make sure you brush with brass prior to doing any rub on waxes.  Make sure the wax says it can be used for rubbing such as Dominator Zoom etc.  After you rub it on, then you need to use a non abrasive (white) fiber pad, felt, or cork to buff the wax down with a lot of pressure and speed to create a tiny bit of heat.  Then brush well with nylon.  This is super for travel or when you don't have time for a good iron waxing.  Paste waxes can be okay, but I would lean toward a "rub on" wax first.  Take care Solo.

 

Oh yea, edit:  BTW see this video.  It is just about the same as any rub on wax although it is a budget overlay.

post #4 of 7

Get some Hertel (presumably other roughly similar waxes would work OK as well). Rub on & cork in after each day - takes 60 seconds all in. Skip the hot wax. I have several pairs of skis with dozens of days each under this regime - in conditions ranging from -12F to liquidy slush. My bases have never been in better shape. My skis are plenty fast for me. I'm not quite ready to toss my irons, but I have not plugged one in in two years....

post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
 

Get some Hertel (presumably other roughly similar waxes would work OK as well). Rub on & cork in after each day - takes 60 seconds all in. Skip the hot wax. I have several pairs of skis with dozens of days each under this regime - in conditions ranging from -12F to liquidy slush. My bases have never been in better shape. My skis are plenty fast for me. I'm not quite ready to toss my irons, but I have not plugged one in in two years....


OMG you said the "H" word!   I just won't go there!  ;)

post #6 of 7

I think using a rub-on wax for the purpose of hot wax preservation is a waste of time. White patches are a result of base abrasion, and to prevent that you need wax in the base and not some paste that sits on the surface and rubs off in a few runs. A harder wax will be beneficial here.

 

Most shops will do a wax and buff with something like a Wintersteiger Waxjet. This approach is much quicker (especially at volume), but won't last as long as wax ironed in a scraped.

post #7 of 7
There's a tendency for people to call white or gray patches base burn, when normally they just scratch off with a finger nail, which means it's just loosened wax.
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