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Big, heavy advanced Intermediate ski

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Hello I'm a 50 year old 6ft 230lb advanced intermediate, fairly aggressive skier who'll be teaching his tween kids how to ski, and then going backside to have some alone time fun.

 

Any recommendations for a good all mountain ski?

post #2 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlenD View Post
 

Hello I'm a 50 year old 6ft 230lb advanced intermediate, fairly aggressive skier who'll be teaching his tween kids how to ski, and then going backside to have some alone time fun.

 

Any recommendations for a good all mountain ski?

Welcome to EpicSki!  Where is your family skiing the most?

post #3 of 19

private message sent

post #4 of 19

Do yourself and your kids a favor and put them in the ski school.  You will all have more fun.  Teaching your own kids or spouse is almost always a recipe for disaster.  And whatever bad habits you have will be passed along.

post #5 of 19

^^^^ Agree with this, but understand that financial reality may not. So as far as skis, here are some nice damp beefy skis that should hold up, without being too demanding or too pricey, and can work both for family stuff and backside. 

 

Head REV 85 or 90

Atomic Blackeye or Crimson Ti

K2 AMP Rictor 82 or 90 Ti

Blizzard Brahma or Bonafide

Dynastar Outland 87

 

Of these, the Blizzards will be the most demanding, the Heads the least, but all are doable for a solid intermediate of your size. 

post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 

Those examples were very helpful. With the youtube test replies I've narrowed it down the Head or the K2. Thank you!

post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 

Got my level 2 psia way back in the 80s, although it has long since expired. Sure hope things haven't changed too much. There's a perfect little hill in town call Canada Olympic Park that I've already started teaching the kids with my old Atomics. So far, so good; I haven't wanted to kill them, and they haven't wanted to kill me. I'm going to get them at least Blue run worthy, then take them to Sunshine, Lake Louise, Nakiski and Norquay to start.

post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlenD View Post
 

Got my level 2 psia way back in the 80s, although it has long since expired. Sure hope things haven't changed too much. There's a perfect little hill in town call Canada Olympic Park that I've already started teaching the kids with my old Atomics. So far, so good; I haven't wanted to kill them, and they haven't wanted to kill me. I'm going to get them at least Blue run worthy, then take them to Sunshine, Lake Louise, Nakiski and Norquay to start.

Lucky kids!  I waited until the local ski school had my daughter good enough for blues out west before spoiling her with a trip to Alta during spring break.  Tween years are a great time for trips out west.

 

Have you skied on shaped skis at all?  For those who were solid parallel skiers on straight skis, the wider stance takes a little adjustment.

post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 

Funny you should mention that; I splurged on a pair of Solomon F9s a year before Elan came out with the revolutionary "hourglass" skis (sometime in the mid-eighties) thinking it would be the last pair I would have to buy for a while.

 

Let's call that wishful/wrongful thinking # 710. And counting.

 

God, I'm old.

 

Anyway; Can't keep up with the technology, so I though I'd sign up with this community and see what happens.

 

Not disappointed! I have some great leads based on my age, weight (unfortunately), style and supposed ability.

 

Now off to the hill to test drive the new models. They'll still get that dumb blank stare when they ask me about rocker, camber, sidecut, etc. First I'll see how they feel and respond, then figure out the science behind it. I think it's called reverse engineering.

 

Thanks for you response!

post #10 of 19
I hope you have a open mind and want to learn the new movement pattern, Your feet should be shoulder width apart or there abouts. You need to pressure the tounges of the boots and drivethe skis.

If you watch some of the better skiers or some of the higher end race kids out free skiing, you should pick it up. Its so easy to ski once you get the movement patteren and the muscles learn that.

Hey you could always...take a lesson. smile.gif
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 

Toooo funny!  Now give me a paper cut and throw some lemon juice on it! God forbid I try to adapt to the new methods and technologies by asking a qualified person for direction or advice. My boots may just explode at the inquiry.

post #12 of 19

  You did get the manual when you bought the skis?

post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 

I avoid any direct contact with manuals, maps and instructions. It never ends well.

post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlenD View Post

I avoid any direct contact with manuals, maps and instructions. It never ends well.

 



My father would always say, "when all else fails, read the instructions..."
post #15 of 19
Just a thought, but here goes.

I'm 5'10" and ~270. I start to notice it above a 75 waist, really above 85, and anything above is just intolerable to me.

If you are a heavier skier, the farther out the edge of your ski is away from the center of your foot, the worse it is going to push out instead of engage when you start to tip your skis. It happens with everyone I realize, but the heavy weight is a serious amplifier.


If you are 150 and pull 2 Gs you are pushing the edge at 300 lbs. If you are 300 with boots and gear, that's 600lbs. The snow just doesn't support that until you build a platform under your ski.

Get what you want, but I'd stay as narrow under the foot as you can in a ski that will still do what you want.
post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hespeler View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlenD View Post
 

I avoid any direct contact with manuals, maps and instructions. It never ends well.

 



My father would always say, "when all else fails, read the instructions..."

And forgo all those police and fire truck arrivals, and the ambulance rides to the emergency room? Never!

post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sofort99 View Post

Just a thought, but here goes.

I'm 5'10" and ~270. I start to notice it above a 75 waist, really above 85, and anything above is just intolerable to me.

If you are a heavier skier, the farther out the edge of your ski is away from the center of your foot, the worse it is going to push out instead of engage when you start to tip your skis. It happens with everyone I realize, but the heavy weight is a serious amplifier.


If you are 150 and pull 2 Gs you are pushing the edge at 300 lbs. If you are 300 with boots and gear, that's 600lbs. The snow just doesn't support that until you build a platform under your ski.

Get what you want, but I'd stay as narrow under the foot as you can in a ski that will still do what you want.

I can almost understand what you're talking about, and it makes good sense. Opposed to that, a lot of the younger, thinner testers on Youtube like something wider under foot for control in crud. I'll have to test the theory to see what's more comfortable to me. . In Alberta, like anywhere else, the mid-afternoon sun creates crud that should be labeled a widowmaker.

post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlenD View Post
 

Got my level 2 psia way back in the 80s, although it has long since expired. Sure hope things haven't changed too much. There's a perfect little hill in town call Canada Olympic Park that I've already started teaching the kids with my old Atomics. So far, so good; I haven't wanted to kill them, and they haven't wanted to kill me. I'm going to get them at least Blue run worthy, then take them to Sunshine, Lake Louise, Nakiski and Norquay to start.

New skis have changed the teaching techniques.  From my limited perspective, things have changed a lot.

post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlenD View Post
 

Hello I'm a 50 year old 6ft 230lb advanced intermediate, fairly aggressive skier who'll be teaching his tween kids how to ski, and then going backside to have some alone time fun.

 

Any recommendations for a good all mountain ski?

Well I'm 210 pounds; 6 feet; 48 years old, advanced intermediate, fairly agressive...:D... So I guess I could tell you which skis I like...

 

dynastar speed course ti in 183 cm: they stop producing them but you can still find some on e-bay: solid carver that is very versatile at our weight

Blizzard m-power 8.7 ( or 8.5) in 181 cm: same story as above: solid skis that can carve with more float than the speed course...

Kastle mx88 in 178: also solid skis but lighter than the 2 above and more float; still would like to try the 188 cm but the 178 is plenty

 

If you want fatter:

Rossignol experience 98: nice fatter carver so more float, quick for a 98mm, definitly less grip and less of a carver than the 3 before...stiff so plenty of ski in 180 cm

Volkl Mantra: fat gs ski with tons of edge grip... Fun ski but more demanding ( in 184 at least!)

 

At your weight, you could also have a lot of fun on the Nordica Fire Arrow 84 EDT !!! They are power carver skis that will put a nice smile on your face...

 

The outland 87 and the rev 85 I find to soft...

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