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MA - new season new video

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

UPDATE: post #14

 

Hi guys, so new season started and I made a vid for you guys to evaluate and help me improve !

A little bit a bout me, I started skiing last year, never did before, went on the slopes a few times (8-10 times i believe), at the start it was quite akward but later on it got a bit better.

 

Here is my vid from the end of last season:

 

 

This season I went 4 times aswell ( sadly I got sick between or I would go more ) and my goal was to improve a bit upon last season, well thats my goal all the time infact !

 

So here is vid of me today, it wasn't a good ski day however as the piste was really hard and icy ( you can see how my downhill ski loses its edge during the turn towards the cam ).

Anyway I hope you can analyse both vids, tell me if I improved a few things aswell as bad and good points about my skiing and what I need to improve and drills I need to do to improve it.

Thanks.

 

 


Edited by iLoveSkiing - 1/15/14 at 7:08am
post #2 of 27

iLoveSkiing - great, you are moving forwards and turning. That's a good start. You have a million things you need to learn but you have to choose what path to follow. My advice would be to commitment to take ski lessons and learn proper technique and build your skiing around a solid foundation. As for your ski skidding on an ice patch, never underestimate the cutting edge gear out on the market. And always keep your skis appropriately tuned.

 

A few comments. You are now turning using upper body rotation. You are leaning into the turn and pushing your hips out. Banking. Square. This is the default way people new to the sport ski because it pivots their skis around and in the other direction. However, it reduces your edge angles and works on flat even slopes. When it gets steeper and more slippery you will be in trouble. Not to talk bump, crud or deep snow. I would like to se you close your stance a bit and balance over your outside ski. You are an adult heavy person so you definitely need engaged and functional ski edges. Children get away with much less edging due to their light weight. You also need to work a bit on vertical movement.

 

You are pretty close to learning how to carve edge locked.

 

T

post #3 of 27

Well, I'm glad to see you're sticking to skiing, and I commend your intestinal fortitude in posting video here for us to break down. So, here's my break down.

 

Good:

-You are maintaining parallel skiing, and you are using your turn shape to control speed. Many beginner skiers will use a wedge or a skid to control speed rather than turn shape.

-You are engaging your edges more than the average beginner, which is contributing to your ability to shape your turns.

-Your arms are in front of your torso, not at your sides. Lazy arms will get you into trouble.

 

Not so good:

-The most apparent thing I'm seeing in your skiing is an extremely static, even rigid stance. This is fairly typical for a skier just starting out, however, it is something that needs to be developed into a more natural, relaxed stance to progress. Think about when you are walking down a sidewalk. Your posture and gait are correct, but not rigid. Same with skiing. We instructors sometimes do a disservice to our students when we stress stance a lot. Skiing isn't done from a rigid, single stance. It is done fluidly, with stance adjustments happening constantly to suit the situation. Above all else, your muscles should be relaxed and ready to move the skis. If they're locked up to keep your body in a certain position, they're not available to use for skiing.

 

-While a rigid stance isn't functional, there are some general guidelines to keep in mind. It looks to me that somebody has taught you to 'bend your knees!' quite a bit. While bent knees are crucial to good skiing, that's an incomplete picture. Not only do we want to have bent knees, but we also want to have flexed ankles as well. When you pass the camera, I'm seeing a bent knee with an open ankle. The result is that you're skiing from the back seat. I generally point out that it's rather hard to drive a car from the back seat, and the same goes for skiing. To remedy this, flex your ankles as well as bending your knee. A general rule is that you want to have your knees above the toes of your boot, your butt should be over the boot heels. If your knee is over your heel, and your butt is over your ski tails, you're too far back. Flex that ankle to bring yourself forward.

 

-The next thing, and the most minor in relation to the others, is your hand and arm position. Yes, as I said they should be in front of the torso. However, we don't want to have a zombie/Frankenstein's monster type of thing going on either. Bring your elbows down a bit. Again, this is a general guideline, and it changes as you ski, but think of your hand and arm position when you are carrying a tray of food. That is approximately where you want your arms while you ski.

 

All in all, I'd say that you have a basic understanding of some of the concepts. Now it's time to round out those concepts, and deepen your understanding of them, so you can understand why you do the things you do on skis.

 

After you've mastered these things, you'll be ready to play more with upper/lower body separation, counterrotation, and really get into edging and shaping your turns. Good luck!

post #4 of 27
Thread Starter 

Was expecting more people to share their thoughts aswell as offer some advice on what to work on next and what drills they suggest.. since I need drills to do to improve miself till I can get some instructions ( atm no money for that ).

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

-The most apparent thing I'm seeing in your skiing is an extremely static, even rigid stance. This is fairly typical for a skier just starting out, however, it is something that needs to be developed into a more natural, relaxed stance to progress. Think about when you are walking down a sidewalk. Your posture and gait are correct, but not rigid. Same with skiing. We instructors sometimes do a disservice to our students when we stress stance a lot. Skiing isn't done from a rigid, single stance. It is done fluidly, with stance adjustments happening constantly to suit the situation. Above all else, your muscles should be relaxed and ready to move the skis. If they're locked up to keep your body in a certain position, they're not available to use for skiing.

 

-While a rigid stance isn't functional, there are some general guidelines to keep in mind. It looks to me that somebody has taught you to 'bend your knees!' quite a bit. While bent knees are crucial to good skiing, that's an incomplete picture. Not only do we want to have bent knees, but we also want to have flexed ankles as well. When you pass the camera, I'm seeing a bent knee with an open ankle. The result is that you're skiing from the back seat. I generally point out that it's rather hard to drive a car from the back seat, and the same goes for skiing. To remedy this, flex your ankles as well as bending your knee. A general rule is that you want to have your knees above the toes of your boot, your butt should be over the boot heels. If your knee is over your heel, and your butt is over your ski tails, you're too far back. Flex that ankle to bring yourself forward.

 

-The next thing, and the most minor in relation to the others, is your hand and arm position. Yes, as I said they should be in front of the torso. However, we don't want to have a zombie/Frankenstein's monster type of thing going on either. Bring your elbows down a bit. Again, this is a general guideline, and it changes as you ski, but think of your hand and arm position when you are carrying a tray of food. That is approximately where you want your arms while you ski.

 

- What part of the body is rigid, all over? Also doesn't the upper part need to be kind of rigid? I always read that the upper body should be very static and strong while the lower body needs to do most of the moving. How do you suggest I correct this flaw?

 

- I know about flexing the ankle, but the interesting part is that sometimes I do it but sometimes I forget about it, probably because I think about several things to do during my skiing since they are probably not automatic yet, so I think about doing this and that and sometimes forget about my ankles.

 

- I see, I will try to correct that, altho I saw alot of videos from skiers that have their arms quite open, like they want to hug someone.

post #5 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLoveSkiing View Post
 

 

- What part of the body is rigid, all over? Also doesn't the upper part need to be kind of rigid? I always read that the upper body should be very static and strong while the lower body needs to do most of the moving. How do you suggest I correct this flaw?

 

- I know about flexing the ankle, but the interesting part is that sometimes I do it but sometimes I forget about it, probably because I think about several things to do during my skiing since they are probably not automatic yet, so I think about doing this and that and sometimes forget about my ankles.

 

- I see, I will try to correct that, altho I saw alot of videos from skiers that have their arms quite open, like they want to hug someone.

 

I'm seeing rigidity throughout your whole body. No, your upper body should not be rigid when you ski. It should be quiet, and move less than your lower body, but it should never be rigid. To feel the difference, stand in your ski boots. Before you do anything, take a very deep breath in. As you breathe out, allow all your muscles to relax. Allow your shins to settle into the tongues of your boots. Let your skeleton hold you up. That's your starting point. Any use of muscles should be to perform a movement, not to hold you in a position.

 

For your ankles, think of it as a more whole body thing. As you initiate each turn, you should have a movement toward the tips of your skis. Your shoulders and hips should be moving forward toward the new turn. If you are moving forward into the new turn, you're not in the back seat, and your ankles will be closed.

 

As I said, your hand position shouldn't be static, and varies depending on the turn you are making. When you see skiers with their hands wider, its typically because they are executing higher speed turns, where the wider arms allow for more stable balance. At low speeds, the arms can be down more. For example:

*

 

vs.

 

0bf88530_DSCN5807.jpg

 

In the first image, I am making high speed, carving, long radius turns. My arms are pretty far out in that instance. In the second image, I am making low speed, skidded, short radius turns on steep natural terrain. Notice how much tighter my elbows are to my body than in the first picture.

 

 

Remember, everything an advanced skier does is for a reason. If you don't know the reason, merely emulating them isn't going to do you much good. But that's what we're here for. We can give you the why behind the what.

post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLoveSkiing View Post
 

Was expecting more people to share their thoughts aswell as offer some advice on what to work on next and what drills they suggest.. since I need drills to do to improve miself till I can get some instructions ( atm no money for that ). 

- What part of the body is rigid, all over? Also doesn't the upper part need to be kind of rigid? I always read that the upper body should be very static and strong while the lower body needs to do most of the moving. How do you suggest I correct this flaw?

 

Yes, your whole body is rather rigid. You need to know that you can maintain your balance while moving individual body parts.  So here are some drills that can help with that.  Get pretty good at one drill before moving to the next; if this is annoying, just break the rule and move up to the more difficult drills.  Expect perfection to be annoyingly difficult.  Ski for fun too!

 

Drill #1:    Shuffle through your turns.  This will help you realize you can stay vertical, maintaining your balance, while shifting your feet forward and backward.  

               Shuffle = slide one foot/ski forward while sliding the other back, alternating while linking turns.

               Keep both skis parallel.  

               Work on getting it smooth, keeping both skis parallel as you shuffle them back and forth in the direction you are skiing.  

               Shuffling gets you centered over your skis.

               If you have difficulty, try standing up taller with hips more forward.  

               If your arms are shuffling too, work on getting them to remain stable instead.  The movement of the arms sometimes helps getting the shuffling going and is ok at first.  

 

Drill #2:    Step through your turns.  Pick up one ski, put it down, pickup the other, put it down.  March!  

               When you pick up the ski, do it with the tip lower than the tail (difficult but very very important!)   

               Keep skis parallel while you do this. 

               If your tips continue to want to be higher than the tails, you are stuck in the back seat.  Move your hips forward until you get each tip down.  

               It's a great balance drill.  When you can get your marching skis to grip the snow instead of slide around, you are golden.  

 

Drill #3a:  Lift the tail of the right ski (keeping its tip on the snow) for a right turn, and let the other ski turn you as usual to the right.  

               Put the lifted ski down, lift the tail of left ski for left turn, and allow that other ski to turn you the usual way to the left.  

               Put the lifted ski down, repeat.  

               In other words:  lift new inside ski tail, turn, put it down, lift other ski tail, turn in other direction. One lift per turn.  Lift, turn, lift, turn.   

               This will produce tighter turns.  

               It's a GREAT drill!  You cannont, repeat cannot, do this from the back seat.  This drill will get you forward, with all your weight on the outside ski. 

 

Drill #3b: Same drill, but add some upper body stuff. 

              As you turn right, keep your right hip, shoulder, and arm forward and HIGH.  If you were having difficulty maintaining your balance with #3a, this will solve it.

              Lifting that inside half (hip, shoulder, arm) and keeping it forward deletes any banking you may be doing. It will also get your whole upper body facing more downhill than your skis.    

              You are allowing your legs and skis to turn to the right more than your upper body. Another way of saying this... you are "skiing into counter."  

              Repeat repeat repeat, paying attention to keeping the new inside hip, shoulder, and arm forward and high as the skis turn below, inside tail lifted.  

              Lifting that new inside hip, shoulder, and arm should get your weight more directed to the outside ski, which will enable you to get better edge grip with that outside ski.

              It will enable you to ski steeper stuff with more grip.

 

Drill #3c:  Do the same thing but delete the lifted tail.  This is not a drill; you've moved your new skills back into personal skiing!

 

 

- I know about flexing the ankle, but the interesting part is that sometimes I do it but sometimes I forget about it, probably because I think about several things to do during my skiing since they are probably not automatic yet, so I think about doing this and that and sometimes forget about my ankles.

 

Drill #4:   Keeping that ankle flexed while working on other stuff on snow is difficult.  So work on it during all the rest of the day.  

              Practice flexing that ankle while standing in the lift line, while riding the chair with skis dangling, while standing in the lodge buying coffee, walking to the table with your coffee,

              while climbing the steps inside.  At these points in your day you aren't working on other stuff; it's a great time to work on embedding ankle-flexing into muscle memory.

 

 

- I see, I will try to correct that, altho I saw alot of videos from skiers that have their arms quite open, like they want to hug someone.

 

             **  You are carrying your poles in a retracted position, with pole tips behind your body; that is great and a total improvement over last season; keep this going.  

             1.  People hold their arms in different positions at different times, as freeski just said.  Some use very wide arms (scarecrow arms); very effective for balance and even elegant.

             2.  Sometimes people hold their arms pointing more forward, as if carrying a cafeteria tray (less dramatic but very stable, especially for short turns, again as freeski pointed out).

             3.  Some alter the cafeteria tray thing a little by moving the hands wider than the elbows (assures that the hands do not move left-right as you ski).  

                  Is one more effective than another for slow easy-goes-it skiing?  Probably not.  

                  However, you are currently skiing with a rigid body and rigid arms.  Loosening up would be good.  

Drill #5:  Try each of the three methods described above.  Finding that you can maintain your balance while holding your arms in different ways will enrich your balance options.  


Edited by LiquidFeet - 1/14/14 at 8:05am
post #7 of 27
Thread Starter 

Thanks LiquidFeet, i will be doing the drills you described next time out. And don't worry its not too difficult, im not a person who gives up easily, I will do those drills in that order and move on to the next ones once I feel I mastered the one before. I have alot of work to do next time ! Can't wait !

post #8 of 27

Some history may be helpful....

other ma thread

 

bit of a tip thread

 

 

I will repeat some earlier recommendations:

1) in person coaching will be more effective than Internet coaching at this stage of development

2) ankles need to flex more

 

and add 2 more:

3) Shin-Tung

4) Tony Knows how to ski

 

Please study the ancient Chinese skiing art known as Shin-Tung (this is a joke). This is where the Shin on the leg makes contact with the Tongue of the boot. Although your weight should shift forward and backward slightly while we are skiing, at the furthest back point we generally (i.e. for recreational skiing) don't want any space to develop between the shin and the tongue of the boot. At the furthest forward point, the boots should flex because of pressure applied by the shin to the tongue. The reason we make this joke is that after you begin practicing this ancient Chinese skiing art and feel the results you will say (in a Chinese accent) "Ahhhhh - Shin-Tung!!!!!" and feel wiser when you say it.

 

When you practice Shin-Tung, your toes, knees and nose will be in vertical alignment (aka Toe Knee Nose = Tony Knows!). In your clip above your knees are behind your toes and your nose is in front of your toes.

 

You've been told this by several other posters already. Bend less at the hip and more at the ankles. Think about moving your belly button forward. When you get into a more athletic stance, you will lose the rigidity and be able to ski much easier and more comfortably. 

post #9 of 27
Thread Starter 

One more question about drill 3b, using upper body, skiing into counter.

When thinking about it a bit I can got two ways for this to happen in my head, which is the more correct one?

1. Going to the turn and pushing ur right side ( hips, shoulders.. ) forward

2. Leaving ur body more towards the fallline and turning more with the legs

 

So in the 1st case I am focusing on pushing my body more towards the fallline by pushing my right side forward, while in the 2nd case im leaving my body behind towards the fallline while focusing more on the leg turning. Both cases would lead to a similar thing, but which is more correct to focus on and do?

post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLoveSkiing View Post
 

One more question about drill 3b, using upper body, skiing into counter.

When thinking about it a bit I can got two ways for this to happen in my head, which is the more correct one?

1. Going to the turn and pushing ur right side ( hips, shoulders.. ) forward

2. Leaving ur body more towards the fallline and turning more with the legs

 

So in the 1st case I am focusing on pushing my body more towards the fallline by pushing my right side forward, while in the 2nd case im leaving my body behind towards the fallline while focusing more on the leg turning. Both cases would lead to a similar thing, but which is more correct to focus on and do?

 

"Pushing" sounds dramatic, as if your upper body needs a big change.  You don't want that - too much sudden movement can throw you off balance.

"Leaving" sounds like the upper body stops moving while your legs do their thing; you don't want that either because it will put you in the back seat.  

Ideally, nothing stops moving, and nothing moves suddenly.

It sounds to me like you haven't had a chance to go out and try this yet.

 

You want your upper body to move smoothly on its course from turn to turn, while your legs move smoothly on their course from turn to turn.  Both continually move.  

The upper body and the lower body need to be independent, not stuck together rigidly.  Sort of both sides of the coin kind of thing.  
 

It clearly will be easier if you have an instructor show you.  It's words words words here on the internet.  

Aim for smoothness.  Trial and error will be your guide until you get personal feedback from a coach's eye. 

Go try and report back; see what you can come up with.


Edited by LiquidFeet - 1/14/14 at 3:02pm
post #11 of 27

there is another way to feel it possibly before you go ski.

 

lying on your back with feet lightly pressed into the wall

lift the right leg like you would while skiing

with left leg straight rotate the leg in and back to vertical position(neutral), repeat

 

bring attention to hip movement, then feel how the pelvis rolls to the right as the leg turns in, then attention to how the right ribs open and right shoulder slides up as the pelvis rolls.

 

lying on your back constrains the upper spine and you can feel where the movement between the pelvis and upper body will happen and you can go look for it later on the hill.

post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by chad View Post
 

there is another way to feel it possibly before you go ski.

 

lying on your back with feet lightly pressed into the wall

lift the right leg like you would while skiing

with left leg straight rotate the leg in and back to vertical position(neutral), repeat

 

bring attention to hip movement, then feel how the pelvis rolls to the right as the leg turns in, then attention to how the right ribs open and right shoulder slides up as the pelvis rolls.

 

lying on your back constrains the upper spine and you can feel where the movement between the pelvis and upper body will happen and you can go look for it later on the hill.

 

 

Pelvis should not roll.  

That's the whole point of upper body/lower body separation.  Keep both buttocks on the floor while you point bent knee left-right.

Movement should not happen between pelvis and upper body in the spine.  Repeat: no twisting in the spine!

When you get this skiing movement right, the femur rotates in hip joint as the knee moves; the pelvis does not rotate.

post #13 of 27

Lot's of info here and very little MA.  I would suggest to first learn to balance on your skis.  Someone in a different thread mentioned riding a train or subway without holding on to anything.  I think that would benefit you.  You are very ridged / static and the train will surely win in that situation.   I do see improvement, however it will be a longer-road if you focus on the minutia and not balancing on the skis.

 

I just thought of something else similar.  What if you were standing on a trampoline and your goal was to keep both feet stuck to the mat as your friend made unpredictable movements on the same mat?  This may give you a visual to work with to incorporate the minutia. 

 

Party on-

post #14 of 27
Thread Starter 

UPDATE

 

I went skiing today with a few goals in mind, I did not focus on my rigid stance at all nor did I focus on my arms. I skied for about 4-5 hours all in all.

I focused on 2 things:

 

1. Flexing my ankles

2. Doing the drills from LiquidFeet and trying to get better at them

 

Let me break down how it all went.

 

1. Flexing the ankles, before today I probably flexed my ankles probably about 30% of the time, 70% of the time I forgot. Today I probably flexed them 70-80% of the time, I still forgot a bit a few times when my head was preoccupied with other stuff, but I definetly improved in this aspect and hopefully I will improve further till it becomes automatic.

 

2. Drills went as follows:

 

- Drill 1 Shuffle through turns, I did 3 runs, 1st run it already went pretty decently, alltho I was a bit clumsy still and had a bit of a loss of balance at times, 2nd run went much better and by the 3rd run it was really smooth and without any problems at all, then I moved onto the 2nd drill. Overall I would rate miself at 4.5 out of 5 in this drill.

 

- Drill 2 Step through turns, I did 6 or 7 runs of this one, it was the hardest of all, 1st run was very clumsy and out of sync and balance, 2nd was a bit better but still similar, I then continued to do runs and improve bit by bit and by the 4th run my right turn was really good, skis even griped the snow at times, while my left turn ( which is also my weak turn in skiing ) was horrible, so I continued to do runs till I came to like the 6th run, then I really got the hang of it and decided to do 1 more after still. All in all this drill went pretty good alltho not perfect like the 1st one, I feel like at the end I did a fairly decent job but still room for improvement ( specialy on my left turn ), I also noticed that its easyer to lift the uphill leg while riding the downhill one, when you ride the uphill leg and lift the bottom one its quite a bit harder. Overall I would rate miself at 3 or 3.5 out of 5 in this drill, room for improvement still.

 

- Drill 3a One leg turns while lifting the inside leg, I did 5 runs of this one I believe, it was quite easyer than drill 2 to my suprize, started out so so and got better with each turn and each run, overall in the end I was quite satisfied with it, I could turn left and right while lifting my inside leg of the each turn quite well and the tips were more down than the tails aswell, alltho I feel i can get much better and smoother at this drill still. I would give miself 3.5 or 4 out of 5 in this drill, room for improvement.

 

- Drill 3b Added upper body stuff to it, wasn't really hard ( dunno if im doing it properly ) but I just did it how I thought it felt right and natural and stuck with it. Did a few runs.

 

- Drill 3c Did the upper body counter thing while using both skis now. And had 5 or 6 runs. Overall it feels a bit different than skiing before, im feeling alot more weight on my downhill ski, also I make some turns quite well turned or countered with my hody while others are so so, still can improve alot!

I also noticed when I use the lift up I always had quite a wide stance as a narrow one made me feel out of balance and very clumsy, and now I can do a very narrow stance after these drills and feel quite in balance, I guess they affected this in a positive way.

 

Here is a vid of me trying to do it on my 2nd run ( I got a bit better at it with more runs but I feel like I can improve on it alot more ).

I was hesitant to post this vid tho cuz I plan on going skiing again in 2 days and doing all these drills again and really trying to master all of them, so would probably be better if I made a vid then, but then again at least you guys can tell me if im moving in the right direction now and if you see some improvements in terms of countering and ankle flexing from before.

 

 

btw best to mute it, cuz I added a song by mistake or w/e

post #15 of 27

video is private

post #16 of 27
Thread Starter 

sorry should be fixed now.

post #17 of 27

Try whistling or singing while you ski and shaking your arms to loosen them up. Keep them loose not stiff. Your hands should be a tiny bit lower like you are holding a cafeteria tray.

post #18 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

Try whistling or singing while you ski and shaking your arms to loosen them up. Keep them loose not stiff. Your hands should be a tiny bit lower like you are holding a cafeteria tray.

 

I will try next time, this time i wasn't focusing on arms at all, do you see any improvement in terms of flexed ankles and counter skiing compared to before?

post #19 of 27

I would still like to see you ski with more outside ski pressure. Now you simply just change direction. Its like a non tennis player picking up a tennis racquet and banging at the ball. A real tennis player takes aim at the ball, steps in and prepares for the stroke by back swinging then strikes with a brush and follows threw while using his legs and hips and wrist to add pace and spin to the ball. Same in skiing. You need to give some input if you want some output. Now you get as much out of your turn as you put in. Not much. You need to work harder.

 

You need to bend out over the outside ski. Pointing your hips into the turn. This is called angulation. Try to incorporate some up and down movement as well. Up into transition and down during the turn itself (cant believe I said that). As what comes to your arms, try to point your poles backwards. I don't think "stiffness" is your problem. Its more a position thing. Arms are stretched too far out ahead with pole ends pointing down at the snow in front of you. This is wrong. Point them back. Lower your arms and point them back. An expert tip would be to turn your wrist towards the inside. Try to point your knuckles more downwards. You should aim for a slightly rounded arm position. Air showing between your arm and torso. Now you are not making a pole plant. You should. You can get away without it when carving but in every other kind of skiing situation you should use a pole plant. It helps with your timing.

 

A traditional pole plant would be rhythmed so that when you shift your weight from your old outside ski to your new outside ski you would make the pole plant somewhere near the tip of your new inside ski. Try to isolate the movement to your arm only. The trick with a pole plant is to make it an indication when you want to turn. Not some point you are turning around. This is a typical mistake. Tap the pole and then make your turn. Then bring the arm back into position in a controlled manner. The pole plant will make you look determined and self confident. Or the opposite when done falsely.

post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLoveSkiing View Post
 

UPDATE

 

I went skiing today with a few goals in mind, I did not focus on my rigid stance at all nor did I focus on my arms. I skied for about 4-5 hours all in all.

I focused on 2 things:

 

1. Flexing my ankles

2. Doing the drills from LiquidFeet and trying to get better at them

 

Let me break down how it all went.

 

1. Flexing the ankles, before today I probably flexed my ankles probably about 30% of the time, 70% of the time I forgot. Today I probably flexed them 70-80% of the time, I still forgot a bit a few times when my head was preoccupied with other stuff, but I definetly improved in this aspect and hopefully I will improve further till it becomes automatic.

 

2. Drills went as follows:

 

- Drill 1 Shuffle through turns, I did 3 runs, 1st run it already went pretty decently, alltho I was a bit clumsy still and had a bit of a loss of balance at times, 2nd run went much better and by the 3rd run it was really smooth and without any problems at all, then I moved onto the 2nd drill. Overall I would rate miself at 4.5 out of 5 in this drill.

 

- Drill 2 Step through turns, I did 6 or 7 runs of this one, it was the hardest of all, 1st run was very clumsy and out of sync and balance, 2nd was a bit better but still similar, I then continued to do runs and improve bit by bit and by the 4th run my right turn was really good, skis even griped the snow at times, while my left turn ( which is also my weak turn in skiing ) was horrible, so I continued to do runs till I came to like the 6th run, then I really got the hang of it and decided to do 1 more after still. All in all this drill went pretty good alltho not perfect like the 1st one, I feel like at the end I did a fairly decent job but still room for improvement ( specialy on my left turn ), I also noticed that its easyer to lift the uphill leg while riding the downhill one, when you ride the uphill leg and lift the bottom one its quite a bit harder. Overall I would rate miself at 3 or 3.5 out of 5 in this drill, room for improvement still.

 

- Drill 3a One leg turns while lifting the inside leg, I did 5 runs of this one I believe, it was quite easyer than drill 2 to my suprize, started out so so and got better with each turn and each run, overall in the end I was quite satisfied with it, I could turn left and right while lifting my inside leg of the each turn quite well and the tips were more down than the tails aswell, alltho I feel i can get much better and smoother at this drill still. I would give miself 3.5 or 4 out of 5 in this drill, room for improvement.

 

- Drill 3b Added upper body stuff to it, wasn't really hard ( dunno if im doing it properly ) but I just did it how I thought it felt right and natural and stuck with it. Did a few runs.

 

- Drill 3c Did the upper body counter thing while using both skis now. And had 5 or 6 runs. Overall it feels a bit different than skiing before, im feeling alot more weight on my downhill ski, also I make some turns quite well turned or countered with my hody while others are so so, still can improve alot!

I also noticed when I use the lift up I always had quite a wide stance as a narrow one made me feel out of balance and very clumsy, and now I can do a very narrow stance after these drills and feel quite in balance, I guess they affected this in a positive way.

 

Here is a vid of me trying to do it on my 2nd run ( I got a bit better at it with more runs but I feel like I can improve on it alot more ).

I was hesitant to post this vid tho cuz I plan on going skiing again in 2 days and doing all these drills again and really trying to master all of them, so would probably be better if I made a vid then, but then again at least you guys can tell me if im moving in the right direction now and if you see some improvements in terms of countering and ankle flexing from before.

 

 

btw best to mute it, cuz I added a song by mistake or w/e

It sounds like you had a good day with the drills.  You report that you are feeling more in balance and that's great.  Anything you can do to feel more balanced while moving different body parts around will improve your balance and get you less rigid.  When you are less rigid and more able to move this or that while staying upright and balanced, that means you can handle unexpected terrain variations.  Moving from foot to foot is a constant part of skiing, and being able to do it while lifting a foot or a tail is a strong skill.  Keep at these balance drills.

 

Getting able to handle steeper trails, the bigger forces you'll feel on steeper terrain, and getting comfortable with higher speeds depends on even more. I do see you beginning to get some upper-body-lower-body separation (where skis and legs turn more than the upper body).  The ultimate reason for this separation is to be able to get most of your weight on the outside ski in each turn.  But you can do more with this.  

 

Drill 4: This is a shift of focus for drill 3 above.  Continue to keep your new inside hip/shoulder/arm forward and up as you turn.  But shift your focus to your legs and skis.  Now think about turning your legs/skis more-more-more under that stable upper body.  Challenge:  how far can you turn both skis/legs, while keeping the upper body pointing more down the hill? .....while keeping the new inside hip, shoulder, arm up and forward?   Turn those skis more, more, more while keeping the upper body stable and pointing more down the hill than the skis. 

 

Getting the weight on that outside ski also depends on eliminating that upper body leaning business. Do you still see your torso leaning in, banking, in this video?  That's got to go.  This new focus replaces thinking of keeping the new inside hip, shoulder, and arm high (if they are down and back, that's the definition of banking and skiing square).  So do this:

Drill 5:  New focus...  as you ski, keep your jacket zipper vertical; no tilting zipper allowed.  Video will tell you if you are succeeding.   


People are concerned about the arms, because they are out pretty far and very high.  This is an easy fix.  

Drill 6: Bend your elbows.  Keep those elbows slightly in front of your jacket zipper, with your lower arms horizontal.  Almost done.  Carry your poles so that their tips are behind you; I think of this as "retracted."  Done!

 

Have fun out there... when there's little snow, working on one's form is a great thing to do. 

post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 

Thats amazing Liquid, I really appreciate your help and input, it helps me alot not only in what kind of drills to do to improve but also in understanding the what and how behind proper form and skiing and what is the right way to do things.

Hopefully I can go skiing tomorrow, not sure yet.. otherwise il go monday, I will be doing all those drills from before to start off, my plan is to completely master them all ( till then I will keep doing them everytime I go skiing, at least for an hour or two ). Then I will move onto the new drills from your last post and report back how it went ! Thanks again.

post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLoveSkiing View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

Try whistling or singing while you ski and shaking your arms to loosen them up. Keep them loose not stiff. Your hands should be a tiny bit lower like you are holding a cafeteria tray.

 

I will try next time, this time i wasn't focusing on arms at all, do you see any improvement in terms of flexed ankles and counter skiing compared to before?

Ankles are better. Most of your weight is in between your toes and heels.

 

 

It looks like all of your weight is in between your toes and your heels, but your right side is back. See the gap between your right knee and the green line?  You should also be able to imagine a plane surface between the red and the green line. Your nose is behind that line. Tony Knows means that the nose has to come forward more. See how your upper back is rounded? You are moving weight forward by moving the shoulders forward. I want you to move the belly button forward instead.

 

Another check is if the angles of the lower leg match the angle of the back. The left leg is pretty good. The right leg is not bent enough. Same thing I said above.

 

With respect to counter we want to see the angle of the line between the ski tips matching the angle of the lines of the belt buckles and the shoulders. In this picture however much the right ski is leading the left ski, the right hip should lead the left hip and the the right shoulder should lead the left shoulder. From the angle of the picture it is hard to see that the green ski tip line is not parallel to the red hip and shoulder lines, but you should try to visualize those lines when you ski. The red arrow here shows where you are looking. The green arrow shows where you should be looking. The red dots indicate where your left hip and shoulder are positioned. The green dots show where they should be positioned. I can see you trying to do this in an earlier turn, but there you are turning your head instead of your hips and shoulders. And (this is the most important part), you don't get into this position by turning your hips and shoulders. You get into this position by having your lower body turn more than your upper body does.

 

One more very subtle point. I'm using this picture as an example for demonstration only. In this shallow of a turn, you don't need as much counter as I'm telling you to get. The real fix for this particular turn is to reduce the tip lead. The problem here is that although pulling back the right foot gets you into the position you should be in, it is not the movement you need to add to your skiing to avoid getting into this position in the first place. For some people the pull the foot back tactic works best, but it is a back door approach to effective skiing movements. I'm all for using the back door ... if the front door is locked.

post #23 of 27

TheRusty knows what he is talking about.  Pay close attention to what he says.

post #24 of 27
Thread Starter 

Sadly tomorrow it won't be possible to go, too bad, seems il go monday then and report back, meanwhile it do some drills and visualizations at home till then.

 

Very good advice TheRusty, ive learned alot from what you wrote and understand some mechanics much better now.

I was initiating tip lead without really thinking much about how much I should be doing it, it served as kind of a "help" to try and get the inside hip forward, now I understand tip lead should be as much as hip and shoulder lead, they should all be in the same line. It seems like thats really hard to do and you become better at it with practice, tho I doubt even when you are really good at skiing its always perfectly aligned in every single turn, or is it?

Also a very good tip about how you get into this position, because when I was trying this out I was doing exactly the way you describe is wrong "trying to push my hip and shoulder forward" instead of focusing on turning with the legs and keeping my body downhill. This tip will help alot.

post #25 of 27

There are always exceptions to the rule. And to misquote from Pirates of the Caribbean "the rules are only like guidelines anyway". If you are not getting the results you want to get, the rules are a good place to look for different options.

post #26 of 27
  • iLoveSkiing, I think your progress is commendable. Your ease and comfort level clearly increases with each video. Good Job!
post #27 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdxammo View Post
 
  • iLoveSkiing, I think your progress is commendable. Your ease and comfort level clearly increases with each video. Good Job!

 

Thank you good sir, I will try not to disapoint with my next one. I try my best, I developed a real passion about skiing and I have a clear goal in my head and I will reach it. Now its time to put alot of effort into it, on the long road to there.

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