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Skis suitable for night skiing conditions...???

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
What would be the best skis to ski on for suboptimal night skiing conditions, and what quality would lend to that?

I took my '12/13 Kästle FX94 out for a ride last night, thinking the slope condition after heavy Sat skier traffic would be less than perfect. Still, I thought the temperature would hold up so all the choppy, raily, bumpy imperfections would remain in slushy form for a while, hence my wide skis. I didn't think the temp would go down fast to have it all freeze up at night.

..and it did, and the condition rapidly turned icy hard, fast, little grip while bumpy and choppy...And I got my butt kicked.
post #2 of 20
Everyone knows black skis are no good at night.
post #3 of 20
Seriously. "Sub-optimal night skiing" is totally redundant. Where are you skiing? I have a lot of experience with sub-optimal. Need more info. Are you racing? Just masochistic?
post #4 of 20

There are no skis for night skiing, just for skiing. ;)

 

In general (where I night ski) you just factor in the lack of sun hitting the snow and an appropriate temp drop to

make you best guess what the snow condition will be. At my hill they groom everything around 6pm so daytime skier traffic is not really an issue.

 

Now if you want to talk about what goggle lens works best at night, that's another story  :D 

post #5 of 20
The glow-in-the-dark ones....
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Everyone knows black skis are no good at night.

Totally agree, unless they are the Kastle FX94's which have that blue HID headlight imbedded in the tip.

OP, did you have your high beams on?:eek

That might shed a bit of light on your query.

D1

post #7 of 20

Those old K2 Fours of twenty or so years ago--the ones with the little red lights--were pretty cool at night.... And many skiers prefer "shot-skis" at night.

 

Seriously--skis are blind. They don't care if it's light or dark. Snow is blind too. You don't really suspect that the snow conditions change from day to night, do you?

 

On the other hand, since you are far more likely at night to be skiing on groomed snow--and perhaps groomed snow that has been polished by a day of traffic--than in deep snow or moguls, a narrower, well-tuned ski that wants to carve scars into the snow surface may be the right choice for you. If you're up to it, try a slalom race ski and have some fun with G-Forces!

 

Best regards,

Bob Barnes

post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

...... And many skiers prefer "shot-skis" at night ......
+1 on the shot skis
Work great at night for skiers of all ability levels
post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hard uneven bumpy choppy ice where there is no good edge contact, with nice white ice particles sprinkled on top. You can hear nice ice shaving sound on turns... I almost pulled out my hockey skaters.

I thought about SL skis but I'm thinking the surface is just too uneven and choppy for the edge to contact the surface and grip.

No, it wasn't a race night.

Am I just being unrealistic? Should I just forget about night skiing and stay home blog on epicski over ice cold beer, rather?
post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 
...For sure I'm no level 9 skier, who can ski anytime anywhere
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post
 

Those old K2 Fours of twenty or so years ago--the ones with the little red lights--were pretty cool at night.... And many skiers prefer "shot-skis" at night.

 

Seriously--skis are blind. They don't care if it's light or dark. Snow is blind too. You don't really suspect that the snow conditions change from day to night, do you?

 

On the other hand, since you are far more likely at night to be skiing on groomed snow--and perhaps groomed snow that has been polished by a day of traffic--than in deep snow or moguls, a narrower, well-tuned ski that wants to carve scars into the snow surface may be the right choice for you. If you're up to it, try a slalom race ski and have some fun with G-Forces!

 

Best regards,

Bob Barnes

 

Well, night time sure is colder than day time, and if the day time temps were warm enough to softening the snow, the night-temp snow conditions can become pretty atrocious as the temps start to plunge.  That scenario pretty much defines night league racing here in Massachusetts.

post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 
But don't they groom the run before setting gates?
post #13 of 20
My neck of the woods,they set gates then 4-5 skiers skid behind each other to clean up line.So I guess you can call that grooming in a way
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by nochaser View Post

But don't they groom the run before setting gates?

Answer (in my league): no. But that's not the point anyway. It's the other 2 hours and fifty nine minutes of free skiing that shakes, rattles, and rolls over re-frozen crap...
post #15 of 20
... that you can't see except through a dim miasma of sodium lights and scratched goggle lens.
post #16 of 20

I don't think my race hill (Nashoba Valley) grooms before the night session.

 

In my experience, grooming the hill during operational hours doesn't really work as the churned-up new layer doesn't have the time to really bond to the firm layer underneath, so you wind up with soft snow that's sitting on top of something firm...  it's great for the first run or two and then it just gets all pushed around the place.  It doesn't ski anything like a groomer that's had a chance to "set" all night.

 

After the course is set the racers are encouraged to side-slip the course, etc, so I have a feeling that's the "grooming" that we get.

post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by nochaser View Post

Hard uneven bumpy choppy ice where there is no good edge contact, with nice white ice particles sprinkled on top. You can hear nice ice shaving sound on turns... I almost pulled out my hockey skaters.

I thought about SL skis but I'm thinking the surface is just too uneven and choppy for the edge to contact the surface and grip.

No, it wasn't a race night.

Am I just being unrealistic? Should I just forget about night skiing and stay home blog on epicski over ice cold beer, rather?

Night skiing has long been my favorite!   You can see so much better. Never flat light, and darn near every individual ice chip is visible. 

 

I would attribute a lot of my edging skills, ice skills and bump skiing skills to night skiing! 

 

Also generally not crowded!  Seriously, that ultra hard frozen stuff is excellent training!   Get a Cheater GS Ski or a Race Stock slalom  put a 4 degree side edge on 'em and let the fun begin!!!!

post #18 of 20

any near WC sl ski is probably the best bet. they handle the choppy ruttiness better than you think. 

 

When I was skiing in pa thats what I used. 

post #19 of 20

LOL I love the idea of mounting LEDs on the front of my bindings!!!

post #20 of 20
What doesnt kill you makes you better. Stiff narrow skis and a light touch on the edges
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