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How to ski crud - Page 3

post #61 of 64
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cody Feuz View Post
 

This has been an interesting thread and the more I follow these threads, I become more impressed by the depth of knowledge that I find on this forum.  I have on occasion attempted to offer my "advice" in these "Ski Instruction & Coaching" forums, and a couple of times have been kindly put in my place.  :)  That is when I realized that this particular forum is really geared to the professional discussions around many of the finer technical points of skiing.  Once I realized the context, then the discussions began to make more sense. 

So, my observations as a non-professional for skiing variable snow, "crud", are the following:

1 - I personally think that the wider skis have made a big difference in how aggressively I can ski highly variable snow, (crud).  Don't know if that is a "placebo" effect, but at least in my head it seems to be the case.

2 - I tend to ski with a wider stance and this seems to be suited for skiing aggressively, (fast) in these conditions.

 

I think this video may illustrate this approach to skiing highly variable snow and terrain at a fairly aggressive approach.  (shot with GoPro, so it obviously doesn't show the body position like the prior videos, but it does let you see the skis and footwork involved).  I'd be interested in the thoughts and insights as to where this shows how to, and/or how not to ski crud.  And hopefully, this provides some content to add to the discussion taking place.

 

 

Cool video and great skiing. Also nice that you like the forum, keep posting. Yes, wider skis are definitely better in crud. Gives you a better platform and float's higher in the snow and gives you a much smoother and faster ride. Therefore promotes a wider stance. I'm stuck with narrow skis but that's another story. Well done, thanks for sharing..... maybe I should get a GoPro after all.....

post #62 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holiday View Post
 

 

Interesting,

This quote was supposed to be the point you quoted as well.

 

It makes me wonder what you expect from an internet forum.  A page on a then b then c, w/ detailed diagrams? I think the touch on technique, and tactics, mixed with "micro" descriptions is exactly what the internet forum should be good for.

I don't expect too much, actually, beyond entertainment and lively debate.  Skiing is a repeated-motion practice sport, like golf, tennis and various others.  It takes hundreds of hours to learn how to react to the conditions, manage weight, balance, body position etc.  I stand by my view that the micro descriptions are useless and pedantic.

 

Then, if there is something you don't get, you search deeper, take a lesson,

Yes, by all means, take a lesson.  And a good lesson will have you focusing on one or 2 things at a time and repeatedly practice them until they're second nature.

ask questions. Of course, that comes from a guy who has been a member for 13 years, and has posted less then 800 times total, so I"m not too verbose. 

 

I must admit, I don't think your retired instructor buddy gave you good advice, it's worth what you paid for it and makes me thinks he retired to become a knee surgeon and is looking for business. Fast and risk can become great, and the use of them should only go up as the skills are increased in my opinion.

Since you haven't seen me ski and you don't know the guy, you can't possibly know if it's good or bad advice.  His advice really was for me.  My technique isn't an impediment to anything, I just take it slower and more cautiously than I need to.  I'll over-survey to pick a line before dropping in when there's really only one line that makes any sense.  That kind of thing.  A buddy and I ski with him in Utah and his advice for the other guy is quite different.  We're both way beyond stuggling with crud, bad conditions, debates on whether 2mm more width will matter, or any of that.  The "crud" depicted in the OP's video actually looks pretty damn good to me.  

 

When I first saw the thread I was expecting "crud" to be that same snow,  2 days later in the morning, after a warm 40deg day followed by a 20deg night.  Now it's all frozen chickenheads cemented together.  Crud deLuxe, so to speak.  I do wish that wasn't a struggle, but such conditions are hard for the best of the best.

 

Of course, that comes from a skier who started skiing late (18), and proudly admits to being "more skilled then bold".

 

Cheers,

Holiday

Apart from the above, I've truly come to believe that shaped skis and intensive grooming have done 3 things:

 

1.  dramatically lowered the bar for getting people on the slopes and skiing at a good enough level to be having fun (good)

2.  caused the industry and ski instruction culture to revolve around primarily around those people carving (there are obvious exceptions, most blatantly Mad River for example).  (bad for advanced skiers)

3.  for the majority 1 and 2 conspire to actually made it harder to advance further because those people were able to largely short-circuit the basic skills that they need later but never had to get good at in the first place. (bad for intermediate/advanced skiers aspiring to get better but can't ski 20+ days a year)

 

Threads like this on Epic continually reinforce that belief.

post #63 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cody Feuz View Post
 

This has been an interesting thread and the more I follow these threads, I become more impressed by the depth of knowledge that I find on this forum.  I have on occasion attempted to offer my "advice" in these "Ski Instruction & Coaching" forums, and a couple of times have been kindly put in my place.  :)  That is when I realized that this particular forum is really geared to the professional discussions around many of the finer technical points of skiing.  Once I realized the context, then the discussions began to make more sense. 

So, my observations as a non-professional for skiing variable snow, "crud", are the following:

1 - I personally think that the wider skis have made a big difference in how aggressively I can ski highly variable snow, (crud).  Don't know if that is a "placebo" effect, but at least in my head it seems to be the case.

2 - I tend to ski with a wider stance and this seems to be suited for skiing aggressively, (fast) in these conditions.

 

I think this video may illustrate this approach to skiing highly variable snow and terrain at a fairly aggressive approach.  (shot with GoPro, so it obviously doesn't show the body position like the prior videos, but it does let you see the skis and footwork involved).  I'd be interested in the thoughts and insights as to where this shows how to, and/or how not to ski crud.  And hopefully, this provides some content to add to the discussion taking place.

 

Great video, looks like a great day!  Damn!  I really don't think you need much advice.

post #64 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by kletter1mann View Post
 

Apart from the above, I've truly come to believe that shaped skis and intensive grooming have done 3 things:

 

1.  dramatically lowered the bar for getting people on the slopes and skiing at a good enough level to be having fun (good)

2.  caused the industry and ski instruction culture to revolve around primarily around those people carving (there are obvious exceptions, most blatantly Mad River for example).  (bad for advanced skiers)

3.  for the majority 1 and 2 conspire to actually made it harder to advance further because those people were able to largely short-circuit the basic skills that they need later but never had to get good at in the first place. (bad for intermediate/advanced skiers aspiring to get better but can't ski 20+ days a year)

 

Threads like this on Epic continually reinforce that belief.

 

OK, cool.

 

Not all ski instruction is on piste, though, In my 20plus years of teaching, I have specialized in teaching people off piste skills. as you say, that is where the fun is. For 5 of those years, with all mtn ski pros, that is absolutely all we did. People came from traditional ski schools to us to see what the natural snow was all about. And, there are lots of others as well, along w/ clinics that focus on natural snow skiing at resorts that have a lot of it.

And, I do believe great off piste skiing is achievable for anyone, maybe not all steep chutes, or ugly bumps, as athleticism and acceptance of a certain degree of risk become necessary, but almost all off piste snow can be skied comfortably by most w/ good technique and training.

 

I'm glad "ski fast and take chances" was a great tip for you. Your answer leads me to believe you were/are a bit like me, more skilled then bold, and he wanted you to loosen up and believe in your skills. 

 

I still think skiers seeing good images (not unlike the one I posted of me skiing "crud") with a few technical thoughts helps to plant a seed, and the learning happens when the student is ready.

 

Cheers,

Wade  


Edited by Holiday - 2/27/14 at 5:11pm
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