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binding adjustment? - Page 2

post #31 of 42

Bought new, skied six times, knows skier, knows binding has been functioning as advertised, passed on to friend with same boot size.

Bought from the Sally Anne or church bizarre .

See any difference?

 

I'm not telling OP what to do; he can decide what to do for himself, but I will say what I would do.  What I would do is check the din chart at a local resort and set it, then check the forward pressure, no different than what I would have done when I knew next to nothing about it, except now I would check the forward pressure and then I didn't know about forward pressure. 

post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by WC68 View Post

Is testing the binding release settings standard at every shop that works on bindings? Do all shops have this equipment?

Another question, lets say a shop installs a binding and sets it at the prescribed DIN, say 8. It's tested, and the test reveals the DIN is off by 1, and has a release value of 7. Is the binding then set at 9 to compensate? Or is the binding considered faulty?

 

No, that is fine, even though the window says 9, it will be torquing as it if was an 8. This is one of the main reasons to have bindings tested. 

post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

No, that is fine, even though the window says 9, it will be torquing as it if was an 8. This is one of the main reasons to have bindings tested. 
So if the skier needed a 9 DIN, you'd set it at 10?
post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by WC68 View Post


So if the skier needed a 9 DIN, you'd set it at 10?

Again. depending on the torque range, it might be a 9.5. 

post #35 of 42
And to think there use to be screwdrivers available in the lift line at Spruce in Stowe to adjust binding with......
post #36 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Griswald View Post

And to think there use to be screwdrivers available in the lift line at Spruce in Stowe to adjust binding with......

 

Still did last time I skied there...

post #37 of 42
That's amazing.
post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Griswald View Post

And to think there use to be screwdrivers available in the lift line at Spruce in Stowe to adjust binding with......

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Griswald View Post

That's amazing.

 

For snowboarders too, to tighten down their bindings.

post #39 of 42

For the few years that I've been on this site, bindings and how to adjust comes up on occasion and you get a few different responses.

 

1. Go do it yourself no problems, here's the info required.

2. Get all the testing tools and spend up to several $1000 dollars for the tools.

3. Let the pros do it only.

4. Learn and understand the risks, before doing your own let alone someone else's and get pro assistance when required.

 

My personal opinion is in the following order:

 

1. If you got to ask get a pro (or at least seek their assistance even if it costs you).

2. I am now more hesitant depending on what is ask, in pointing on where to get the information as I agree based on some of the questions, those asking aren't ready and should seek a pro.  If you understand the hint that the information is there you can find it with a bit of searching, you have likely advanced your education and may now be somewhat ready to do some of the work.

3. Finally, if you know the risks and are will to take them, along with you know what you are doing go for it (I do regularly, my own and family), BUT you also have to know when to get someone else (pro) to do the work (even for family).  I don't have the torque tool at this point so the shop checks it when I need them checked.

 

Pro's can make mistakes, so when they work on my equipment, I check and know what to look for, it's my legs and knees that suffer if a mistake is made (no offense to the Pro's here).  Fairly though, most times they do the right job and must follow rules (that are caused by the legal system and blame being laid on everyone but the fool who caused the problem in the first place) whether we like them or not.

 

The easy answer is use common sense, but as the saying goes, common sense is not as common as one would expect.

 

@ the OP, you mess up the bindings for your wife, remember you have to deal with the repercussions and she knows where you live and has keys to the door :eek.

post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post
 

For the few years that I've been on this site, bindings and how to adjust comes up on occasion and you get a few different responses.

 

1. Go do it yourself no problems, here's the info required.

2. Get all the testing tools and spend up to several $1000 dollars for the tools.

3. Let the pros do it only.

4. Learn and understand the risks, before doing your own let alone someone else's and get pro assistance when required.

 

My personal opinion is in the following order:

 

1. If you got to ask get a pro (or at least seek their assistance even if it costs you).

2. I am now more hesitant depending on what is ask, in pointing on where to get the information as I agree based on some of the questions, those asking aren't ready and should seek a pro.  If you understand the hint that the information is there you can find it with a bit of searching, you have likely advanced your education and may now be somewhat ready to do some of the work.

3. Finally, if you know the risks and are will to take them, along with you know what you are doing go for it (I do regularly, my own and family), BUT you also have to know when to get someone else (pro) to do the work (even for family).  I don't have the torque tool at this point so the shop checks it when I need them checked.

 

Pro's can make mistakes, so when they work on my equipment, I check and know what to look for, it's my legs and knees that suffer if a mistake is made (no offense to the Pro's here).  Fairly though, most times they do the right job and must follow rules (that are caused by the legal system and blame being laid on everyone but the fool who caused the problem in the first place) whether we like them or not.

 

The easy answer is use common sense, but as the saying goes, common sense is not as common as one would expect.

 

@ the OP, you mess up the bindings for your wife, remember you have to deal with the repercussions and she  has keys to the new locks:eek.

Fixed it for you. Well stated.

 

I got to thinking and realized that DIN standards are based on average, fit bodies. One of the assumptions is that the bigger--taller and heavier--you are the heavier and stronger your bones are. Unfortunately as one deviates from average things get tricky. If you are tall the higher center of gravity means you apply more leverage to your bindings, so easier to pre release, at least forward release, but you also apply more force to your bones and joints, so easier to break something at a given DIN setting. Same applies if you are fat heavy as opposed to muscular/bone heavy. Ideally there should be a wide threshold between a DIN at which you prerelease and a DIN at which you get hurt. The taller you are and the more obese you are the narrower that threshold becomes. And we all know, or should know, that there is no DIN setting for anyone at which the chance of prerelease is zero and the chance of injury is zero. The point of all this is that a  DIN setting is always a compromise and more of a compromise for some body types, and that if you want to avoid injury the best thing you can do is lose as much excess fat as you can (hard to lose height.)

post #41 of 42

@oldgoat,  Yes...even better, tnxs

post #42 of 42
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the advice. I was in shop buying other items talked to them about bindings and they recommended a setting for me and didn't charge me for the advice. Always good to deal with a local shop that has owners working it.

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