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Smith Blue Sensor Mirror vs Red Sensor Mirror

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

I need a really good flat light lens.  I did a search and the consensus seems to be a Smith Sensor lens, but which one?  They make a blue one and a red one and the descriptions are nearly identical.  Is one better than the other?

post #2 of 24

Blue.....

post #3 of 24

For flat light, the blue is shown as slightly better for flat light but either would be fine. There's also gold. Mostly, I think, the difference is to accommodate varying tastes and match of frames. 

 

http://www.smithoptics.com/technology/#/Snow+Goggle+Technology/?slideID=goggleSelector&techCat=goggleSelectorTech/

post #4 of 24
Thread Starter 

Thanks, blue it will be.  I couldn't find that lens comparison gadget on their website so that was quite helpful.

post #5 of 24
post #6 of 24

This is from over a year ago, but there's some good info in the thread. You could always give @Uilleann a call at his shop to get a lens with info.

 

If you click on the picture you can read the graphs.

 

From thread:

http://www.epicski.com/t/114620/smith-optics-goggle-lens-information/30

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brian Lindahl View Post
 

Ahah... found this photo in an old thread.. it has the Sensor Mirror, as well as a few other missing lenses.

 

 

   edit: clicking on it doesn't seem to work. Go to the original and click on it to read the graphs.
   edit2: do a press 'control' and click and it opens a new jpg which can be enlarged. Very clear view.
I suspect the "Blue Sensor Mirror" may be the "Sensor" in the graph - line 'K'. If so, it would have much less blue light transmission than the others.
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uilleann View Post
 

There it is!  Thanks for digging that one up again Brian!

 

I'm surprised at the dip the Red Sensor Mirror looks to show at approx 585nm.  Although, I would expect the red/orange mirror to attenuate the spectrum in that range somewhat, those curves seem more suppressed in that range than I would have expected.  A 70% difference in red transmission is certainly noticeable between the two styles.  Remember that average human vision generally stops around 750 nm, so anything above that range really won't affect 99% of us in any measurable or meaningful way.

 

 


Edited by Tog - 1/10/14 at 1:29pm
post #7 of 24

Found these Light Transmission Graphs for Smith Lenses.

Red Sensor and Gold Sensor. Did not find the graph for the Blue Sensor.

Gold is 70% transmission and Red 60%

 

 

 

From:

http://www.smithoptics.com/cpsia.html/

 

Other lenses there too.

 

edit: Took screen shot of the previous old graph. I think the "Sensor" of line 'K' might be the current Blue Sensor Mirror.

 

Personally, I'd go for either the Blue or the Gold just because I really dislike a blue tinted lense. Don't know why, may have to do with red/green color deficiency of my eyes.

 


Edited by Tog - 1/10/14 at 1:39pm
post #8 of 24

Wow, keep finding stuff on epicski!

 

Comparison between Blue Sensor Mirror and Red Sensor Mirror Smith Goggle Lenses:

 

Yeah that Red Sensor would drive me crazy.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uilleann View Post
 

Here is a quick "as worn" comparison between the two lenses.

 

1000

Note the more visible color shift in the periphery of the red sensor mirror.  It is difficult to tell from a casual glance, but I'm not 100% convinced the base lens tints are identical after all.  Regardless, the older Sensor Mirror (blue) seems to have a more consistent visual appearance when looking through the lens as is shown above, and also tends to have a more yellow/melanin tint base.

 

The best way to decide is to physically try them on before you buy if at all possible.  That way you'll be able to determine for yourself, what feels most comfortable.

 

Bri~

 

@Finndog you still like the Blue Sensor Mirror Lense?

How does the color one sees vary from the Gold Sensor Mirror?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
 

It appears your sample picture lens' still have the protective covering on them.....  The blue does a better job in low flat light. the gold mirror does provide a slightly better contrast than the blue but this is not as useful in the open terrain.

 

If you cant try out go with the blue, you won't be sorry.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uilleann View Post
 

Yes, they do still have their backside protective films intact - we leave them for the patient to remove.  However, as they are clear, the color cast isn't affected for comparison purposes here.  The gold sensor mirror (which I don't have stock in hand at the moment) should skew colors towards the green/blue slightly.  This is a very comfortable feeling color to many people, though may not be an optimal choice for flat light as you mention.  I don't know about the contrast statement above, as I haven't had a pair on to compare against.  Yet...  :)

 

B~

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uilleann View Post
 

They do indeed.  Remember that any goggle lens that uses the multi-chromic mirror (different color in the middle from the edges or tops and bottoms) such as the Smith Optics Sol-X Green& Red, Sensor Mirrors (Red & Blue), most all of Oakely's Irridium line, Zeal, Anon, Dragon, Electric...they will all affect the final color cast of your visual field in a variable way as the eye moves across the back of the lens.  For many folks, this isn't a problem - but for some, it can be quite disconcerting. 

 

There is of course the steezy variable to take into account with the various mirrors when you're turning heads at your favorite mountain, and for some, I expect this is the main driving force when looking at a given goggle frame/lens color combination. 

 

Best rule of thumb with these lenses would be to try before you buy whenever you can if you have any question as to the comfort of vision once you're at the top of the run.  Make sure they look cool from the outside of course, but also that the visual experience is what you expect from the inside looking out as well.

post #9 of 24

Gold Sensor and Blue Sensor are both 70% VLT so, looking at the above graphs, I would assume similar characteristics.

post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

@Finndog you still like the Blue Sensor Mirror Lense?

How does the color one sees vary from the Gold Sensor Mirror?

 

At the risk of stepping on toes here - the gold sensor mirror would skew perception into a greenish sort of view due to it's reflectance characteristics.  Remember you're dealing with the absorption of the base tint and density, but also with the reflectance of the mirror itself, and the color of the mirror will affect things - sometimes in a rather dramatic fashion as shown above.

 

Cheers

 

Brian~

post #11 of 24

Only a bit off subject: Which goggle has the widest range of lateral vision????

post #12 of 24

@tog yes still loving them

post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carving Lance View Post
 

Only a bit off subject: Which goggle has the widest range of lateral vision????

The Big A** ones. They all make them now.

In terms of the Smith I/O goggle, the I/Ox is the biggest one with most peripheral. I/Os the smallest.

post #14 of 24

Sorry to bring this back from the dead.. but after reading several threads/articles I still cannot decide which one to keep, Blue or Red. Everyone seems to favor one way - Blue... but what are the conditions that would favor Red Sensor (60% VLT) over the Blue one (70% VLT)? 

 

This is the only link that seems to shed some light on the Red lens.. http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/smith-goggle-lens-guide/2

post #15 of 24

As per the above image I posted, the VLT is not the only item to consider.  The human eye perceives the world very differently when viewed with different tints.  The reason you keep hearing about the Blue Sensor mirror here is that, all else being equal, that lens tends to outperform the Red Sensor on the snow in just about every measurable way.  The Red Sensor lens looks steezy from the outside, the the visual experience couldn't be more different from the Blue Sensor as worn by the skier.

 

Ultimately, the choice is up to the individual skier, and if looks are your main concern, then the color of the base tint and mirror is irrelevant to your vision.  However, if you are searching for the most effective lens on the snow - particularly in flat/low light environments - then the Blue Sensor remains the lens of choice (between these two) for quality of vision.  Hope that helps clear things up further.

 

Cheers~

post #16 of 24

I must say that the Red Sensor drove me crazy because? of it's blue looking tint. This was in a snowy almost white out about 11-12,000 feet. Borrowed the goggles and they gave me a headache and made it very hard to concentrate on anything. I switched back to lenses that were too dark but didn't make me nuts. I'd never encountered anything like that but I don't try a lot of different lenses.

 

Is Blue light really that bad for us?

 

Protecting Eyes From 'Bad' Blue Light

By Andrew Karp
Monday, September 09, 2013

http://www.visionmonday.com/business/labs/article/protecting-eyes-from-bad-blue-light-vm-090913/

post #17 of 24

For my .02 are stressing too much. Both are fine for low light.

 

IIRC  feel like I've gotten a bit more sense of depth with the red in some conditions.  The basic Sensor Mirror is the go-to lens for a gajillion people. But IMO you are splitting hairs at that point. Keep one, ski, be happy.

post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by notfound View Post
 

Sorry to bring this back from the dead.. but after reading several threads/articles I still cannot decide which one to keep, Blue or Red. Everyone seems to favor one way - Blue... but what are the conditions that would favor Red Sensor (60% VLT) over the Blue one (70% VLT)? 

 

This is the only link that seems to shed some light on the Red lens.. http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/smith-goggle-lens-guide/

 

 

 

Are you buying the goggles that will come with 2 options one low light ie red or blue and other for bright conditions? I bought these the blackout lense and red sensor and have been happy. If you ski at night I would go with red lens as it lets more light in. The differences to most eyes will be minimal. maybe try on a pair of each and see which you like. I am happy with mine.

post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

I must say that the Red Sensor drove me crazy because? of it's blue looking tint. This was in a snowy almost white out about 11-12,000 feet. Borrowed the goggles and they gave me a headache and made it very hard to concentrate on anything. I switched back to lenses that were too dark but didn't make me nuts. I'd never encountered anything like that but I don't try a lot of different lenses.

 

Is Blue light really that bad for us?

 

Protecting Eyes From 'Bad' Blue Light

By Andrew Karp
Monday, September 09, 2013

http://www.visionmonday.com/business/labs/article/protecting-eyes-from-bad-blue-light-vm-090913/

The short answer is the jury is still out - but it seems to be the new buzz word in ophthalmic circles.  At this early stage in the game, the hype seems to exceed the science...but who knows.  Probably doesn't hurt to minimize exposure - particularly on the slopes.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
 

For my .02 are stressing too much. Both are fine for low light.

 

IIRC  feel like I've gotten a bit more sense of depth with the red in some conditions.  The basic Sensor Mirror is the go-to lens for a gajillion people. But IMO you are splitting hairs at that point. Keep one, ski, be happy.

There is measurable difference between the two lenses, and their performance for an individual will almost certainly differ.  It is, of course, up to the individual to decide which lens feels most comfortable for them.  I always recommend using both lenses outside whenever possible before making a final purchase decision.

 

Cheers~

post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
 

For my .02 are stressing too much. Both are fine for low light.

 

IIRC  feel like I've gotten a bit more sense of depth with the red in some conditions.  The basic Sensor Mirror is the go-to lens for a gajillion people. But IMO you are splitting hairs at that point. Keep one, ski, be happy.

That's what I always thought before trying them in actual conditions. Simply couldn't tolerate it. Maybe it has to do with being red/green color deficient, aka color blind. Don't know.

post #21 of 24

What's odd is that nowadays the majority of IO frame/lens combos come with the Red sensor. If the Blue lens is superior in every way, why not just include it in all combos?

post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by notfound View Post
 

What's odd is that nowadays the majority of IO frame/lens combos come with the Red sensor. If the Blue lens is superior in every way, why not just include it in all combos?

mmmm.... Because they want you to BUY it. 

post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohioskier View Post

 

If you ski at night I would go with red lens as it lets more light in. 

 

If you are referring to the red sensor lens this is absolutely not true, at least according to Smith.  Smith states the red sensor has 60% VLT and the blue sensor has 70% VLT.  I bought the blue sensor lens and have used it a couple times and it is as good as it gets in flat/low light.  I also have a clear lens and it doesn't provide the depth perception the blue sensor does.

post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by notfound View Post
 

What's odd is that nowadays the majority of IO frame/lens combos come with the Red sensor. If the Blue lens is superior in every way, why not just include it in all combos?

I was going to reply to this, as this was the exact question I posed to my Smith reps a couple weeks ago at the Winter O.R. show here.  The answer is...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PAPA View Post
 

mmmm.... Because they want you to BUY it. 

^^^THIS.

 

Sad but true.  It LOOKS cool...ergo people buy it.  Remember, Oakley built an entire marketing empire on this very premise.

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