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Feet Sore When Ski Really Hard, Technique or Boot Issue?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

My feet's outside muscles (on the area where they are the widest) get's rather sore when I push myself, especially in bumps and moguls. Not aching, just felt like the kind of soreness in your legs when one runs too hard. Could it be a technique issue or it's just boot fitting? My boots are rather closely fitted with Sole heat moldable footbed and I can create more space if that's the problem. But I would like to check to see if this may be a technique issue before I start to blame equipment : P

post #2 of 10

Could be either. Impossible to say.

post #3 of 10

Without seeing in person or on video, it's tough to say, but...

 

When people feel like they're not getting enough grip with their skis, or when the boot itself is loose, they often grasp with their feet in the boot, which creates a lot of foot tension. Maybe you're pressing around to seek grip. On the flipside, you may be seeking more grip if your boots are sloppy. 

 

I'd suggest seeking a bootfitter if you feel your foot moving around in the boot. 

 

From a technique perspective, learn to release tension in your skiing from both your upper and lower body. Try sliding your feet forward and back under your body to get comfortable with making  adjustments and to feel comfortable with moving through turns rather than locking into one spot on your ski. Let yourself make some tension-free turns. Get really mobile in your joints by hopping throughout some turns. As an exercise, work on softening the inside leg, then work on softening the outside leg through the end of the turn. Do some drift turns: let your skis slide around the top part of the turn and gradually feather the edge into action. These turns may not be high performance, but you're just working on getting comfortable with sliding and moving. 

 

Again, these are some best guesses for the time being. If we could see some video, it would help. 

post #4 of 10

When you've got a tight fit, it does not take much to press on the wrong nerve and cause some pain or soreness. If you can, try some thinner socks first. If that does not help, then try asking your bootfitter or a podiatrist to try to back track the pain to where boot pressure could be causing the trouble. It could be height or width. It's probably width, but it may not be in an obvious spot and the fix may require bootfitter magic. It's not unusual for custom footbeds to need some tweaking (but do avoid footbeds that need some twerking!).

post #5 of 10

A fairly common thing, especially early in the season when your foot hasn't yet been compressed by frequent skiing. Goes away after several successive days on snow. If it doesn't, check the boots.

post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

 

From a technique perspective, learn to release tension in your skiing from both your upper and lower body. Try sliding your feet forward and back under your body to get comfortable with making  adjustments and to feel comfortable with moving through turns rather than locking into one spot on your ski. Let yourself make some tension-free turns. Get really mobile in your joints by hopping throughout some turns. As an exercise, work on softening the inside leg, then work on softening the outside leg through the end of the turn. Do some drift turns: let your skis slide around the top part of the turn and gradually feather the edge into action. These turns may not be high performance, but you're just working on getting comfortable with sliding and moving. 

 

 

Cool tips. I may have too much tension. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

 

When people feel like they're not getting enough grip with their skis, or when the boot itself is loose, they often grasp with their feet in the boot, which creates a lot of foot tension. Maybe you're pressing around to seek grip. On the flipside, you may be seeking more grip if your boots are sloppy. 

 

 

Could be I was pressing around to seek grip. The boots are definitely not loose~I am thinking they may be not wide enough. 

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

When you've got a tight fit, it does not take much to press on the wrong nerve and cause some pain or soreness. If you can, try some thinner socks first. If that does not help, then try asking your bootfitter or a podiatrist to try to back track the pain to where boot pressure could be causing the trouble. It could be height or width. It's probably width, but it may not be in an obvious spot and the fix may require bootfitter magic. It's not unusual for custom footbeds to need some tweaking (but do avoid footbeds that need some twerking!).

My socks are pretty darn thin~on the other hand, I'm not sure if my footbeds can twerk...they are not sexy enough lol

post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HardDaysNight View Post
 

A fairly common thing, especially early in the season when your foot hasn't yet been compressed by frequent skiing. Goes away after several successive days on snow. If it doesn't, check the boots.

Ok...I was thinking whether my feet's outside muscle can be strengthened like quads

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaserPower View Post
 

Ok...I was thinking whether my feet's outside muscle can be strengthened like quads

 

The small, intrinsic muscles of the feet are very involved in balancing on skis and do get stronger as the season progresses. One tends not to use them as much during the off-season and they often ache the first few days on snow. Even WC skiers notice this after a lay-off. It'll get better, trust me!

post #10 of 10

I can relate 100% to what you are experiencing and here's what I've found:

 

1)  I let me feet adjust gradually to the pressures incurred by skiing. That is, I stay off steeper, bumpier terrain until my feet have had a chance to 'warm up', so to speak. Typically I won't ski steeper, more challenging terrain until late morning, so my feet have had some time to adjust to being clamped inside my boots.  Not sure if this applies to you, but I always find the soreness (and it used to be outright pain until #2 below was diagnosed) diminishes as the day progresses. 

 

2) Alignment. I am knock kneed, which caused me to stand (un)naturally on my inside edges instead of flat on the ski. This issue and the effect it had on my skiing was not diagnosed or pointed out as an inhibitor until after many years of skiing. Since I was biasing my inside edges due to the alignment issue, it made transitioning from one turn to another much harder.

 

My skiing felt 'forced' in a way, and I had to put a lot more effort into going from one turn to the next, especially when skiing steeper terrain and/or moguls, or when skiing crud or really any snow condition beyond hard pack. This translated into more pressure on the outside of my feet causing excessive soreness and outright pain at times.

 

The difference was remarkable once I discovered boot sole planing to compensate for poor alignment. I found my skiing required a lot less energy and my feet were in much less discomfort. 

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