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Question about goggles

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I feel like i want to like wearing goggles when I ski, but i find that they restrict my peripheral vision and i dont like not knowing what is around me when im skiing fast downhill with other people around.  I bought a cheap pair and i wore them once and havent used them since.  do others feel this way?  also the fogging is annoying.  i usually just wear cheap sunglasses when i ski

post #2 of 12
Goggles' peripharal visions and anti fog abilities vary from model to model. There are better models out there than the very cheap ones. Sunglasses will cut it if you only ski in warm temperatures and slower speed since if the temperature drops and speed increases, your eyes start to tear up. Goggles give you better impact protection too.
post #3 of 12

I'm using an old Uvex model of goggles so I can't comment on the most recent stuff (mine is about 10 years old). What I can say is that I have no problem whatsoever with my peripheral vision. And no fog at all (if there's a lot of moisture, I may have some while on ski lifts but that goes away after a few seconds going downhill).

 

How protected are your eyes? Quick piece of advice: no matter if you use sunglasses or goggles, just make sure your eyes are very well protected when skiing (not being dazzled doesn't mean you're protected). Sorry, first thought that came to mind when I read "cheap sunglasses" although I realize it's not necessarily related. Also, make sure they can't hurt you if you happen to fall and break them. I've seen bad injuries because of bad sunglasses. Not all sunglasses are suitable for skiing.

 

Anyway, all that to say the most recent stuff should be even better than my Uvex goggles (a brand that I highly recommend btw, over Oakley or Scott but based on my previous experience of course :)).

post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonmiller74 View Post
 

I feel like i want to like wearing goggles when I ski, but i find that they restrict my peripheral vision and i dont like not knowing what is around me when im skiing fast downhill with other people around.  I bought a cheap pair and i wore them once and havent used them since.  do others feel this way?  also the fogging is annoying.  i usually just wear cheap sunglasses when i ski

 

Your problem is bolded, underlined, and italicized above. Im not a google snob. You dont need to spend $400 to get a working pair of googles. I wear a $50 pair of Scott googles, and they have worked well for me in the relatively balmy weather of NC skiing (40 degrees) as well as the relatively cold weather of northern IL (near 0). 

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

Actually they are Scott goggles :) dont remember how much i paid for them- maybe $30 

post #6 of 12

I should say I PAID $50 for my Scott goggles. Retail was supposed to be around $120 :)

Is the model you have anti-fog treated, or do you have the option to purchase anti-fog lenses? That is the other thing: having a pair of goggles that will allow you to easily swap the lens is invaluable. I have 3 lenses for my pair currently: Dark, polarized, for really sunny days. An "amplifier" lens that helps increase contrast on overcast days. And a clear lens, for night skiing. Also, they make several pairs of goggles that have a wider range of view, such as the POC Lobes, Dragon APXS, etc. Expect to pay more for these. 

post #7 of 12

Take  a look at the I\O series from Smith. The X is the oversized version. An let me tell you it's one nice goggle that covers your needs. Fogging isn't an issue with the double lens with the gore tex vent. And the range of lenses is excellent.  They even give you two lenses with each frame. Which ones depend on the frame color that you choose.  And the frame fits my face extremely well.  Even when I  wear my glasses. 

They're not cheap, but I think they're worth it.

Mike

post #8 of 12

Replaced my old Oakley's do to limited peripheral view (can't remember model), just wore my new Most Excellent $220 Oakley Airbreak's, most I've ever paid for goggles. Can hardly breath thu my nose & scratched the gnar gnar Fire Iridium lens. Miss my old old K2's

 

Lessons learned:

 

Buy good but don't pay $220

 

Bring helmet to assure proper fit

 

Don't ski thru tree branches wearing super-cala-fragilistic-expialidocious lenses

post #9 of 12

Look at some better options than what you had before. I'll second the earlier recommendation for the Smith I/O series. You really shouldn't have any field of view or fogging issues with them.

post #10 of 12
All goggles will restrict your peripheral vision, even the I/O, you just have to live with it unfortunately.

I think fogging is more of an issue of venting, not coating. My I/O has some fancy coatings that barely fogs up, but I've had instances when it's cold enough that any occasional fog instantly freezes so I ended up with layer of ice on upper 1/5 of the lens, which is a game ender since there's no choice besides going in the lodge to thaw it.

The IOX probably won't work with helmet unless your head is huge, the IO barely fits under the brim and not pressing too hard on nose.
post #11 of 12
^^similar deal with Oakley Airbrake. If the top mesh vent of the goggles is all covered by snow then it will fog up between lenses. No choice but to go back in.
post #12 of 12

I felt the same way, OP, until I realized that my eyes were paying for the nice open sunglasses, and all that nice cool air and ice whipping around at speed. You get used to goggles, and then wonder how you ever skied without them. Kinda like a helmet. Meanwhile, yep, most brands now have models with excellent peripheral vision. Of course, you lose the 60's vibe...

 

Agree the real issue is fogging. Answer, sadly, is not to wear tube face protectors that direct warm humid air upward, and learn to breathe through your nose instead of your mouth. Oh yeah, and not to put on goggles while doing serious labor, like hiking or carrying stuff. 

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