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Avalanche - East Vail Chutes

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Sad news out of Colorado. 

1 dead, 3 injured in avalanche near Vail. 

http://denver.cbslocal.com/2014/01/07/1killed-after-4-caught-in-avalanche-near-east-vail/

post #2 of 10
Thread Starter 

Just saw this video tribute for Tony Seibert, with this note. 

Quote:
 

Tony Seibert was an amazing person. Unfortunately today (January 7, 2014) an avalanche in the East Vail Chutes took his life and hurt three others. I loved every moment I spent around Tony and so did his friends and family. He was always so uplifting and caring for others. You will be greatly missed Tony and my thoughts and prayers go out to you and your family.

May you Rest in Peace

post #3 of 10

When a young life is taken so suddenly, it's alway so sad - any life really.  

post #4 of 10
Yep, it is sad. He was the grandson of Pete Seifert, the founder of Vail.

It's also sad because he was evidently skiing East Vail Chutes, a notorious avalanche track in conditions that should've given anyone pause to think about whether that was a good idea. And his mother is a ski patroller.

Sad all around.

Mike
post #5 of 10

My heart sinks for Tony's family, friends and the entire Vail community.   There is a good article in the Vail Daily:

 

Vail founder’s grandson dies in avalanche

http://www.vaildaily.com/news/9653229-113/vail-avalanche-east-seibert

 

Quote:
The East Vail Chutes is an out-of-bounds area accessible through a gate from the lift-served area of Vail Mountain. It is popular with backcountry skiers, but has been the site of eight avalanche fatalities in the last three decades.

 

I hope this foreseeable tragedy will be the impetus for bringing that area inbounds and avy controlled, otherwise it's just a question of how long until the next skier dies back there.   

post #6 of 10
Very sad indeed. You have a young man possessing exceptional skiing abilities drawn to the most challenging terrain and losing his life doing what he loved.

A skier of his caliber and skills would never be content skiing tamer inbounds terrain. I have to believe he did not associate the level of risk the snowpack represented that day.
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

I hope this foreseeable tragedy will be the impetus for bringing that area inbounds and avy controlled, otherwise it's just a question of how long until the next skier dies back there.  

This event is very sad for everybody concerned.  However, with respect, Vail Resorts has neither the moral obligation nor legal authority to "bring..that area inbounds and avy controlled."  If you choose to ski b/c (which EVC is), regardless of how you access the terrain, you assume responsibility for whatever happens, in a situation in which control is largely illusory. I say that with some authority, having over the years survived two major avalanches b/c skiing.

post #8 of 10

My condolences to Tony's family and the Vail community but I don't understand why this happens every season.  I'm as passionate about skiing as anyone else on this site but I'm also fond of the other components of my life as well.  As much as anyone else here, I love to pursue all that the mountain and the snow has to offer but I also want to come home at the end of the day and we must be mindful of the risks we take.

 

We've lost so many good people in the last few years.  The next time you really feel like pushing it, remember the folks who want to see you come home.

post #9 of 10

"The avalanche danger where the latest deadly slide occurred is rated as considerable at or above the tree line for two main reasons. New snow over the weekend was pushed into slabs by wind, and those more cohesive layers of snow are resting on top of the relatively weak early season snowfall, said Spencer Logan of the Colorado Avalanche Information Center. The combination of a weak base layer under cohesive slabs tends to create slides that break in very wide pieces."

 

:nono:

 

I have no words for how tragic this is for the community.  This young man must have been known by just about everyone related to Vail Resorts and the surrounding area.  Oh well, hope none of my kids try to push it like that but I know they will at least once doing something they love.  We all have as younger folks and I can guarantee I'm lucky to be alive today after some stupid stuff I did in my early 20s.

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by raspritz View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

I hope this foreseeable tragedy will be the impetus for bringing that area inbounds and avy controlled, otherwise it's just a question of how long until the next skier dies back there.  

This event is very sad for everybody concerned.  However, with respect, Vail Resorts has neither the moral obligation nor legal authority to "bring..that area inbounds and avy controlled."  If you choose to ski b/c (which EVC is), regardless of how you access the terrain, you assume responsibility for whatever happens, in a situation in which control is largely illusory. I say that with some authority, having over the years survived two major avalanches b/c skiing.

 

I responded in the sidecountry thread, feeling like I never should have brought up this discussion here.

http://www.epicski.com/t/120009/sidecountry-does-not-exist/360#post_1668594

 

More approperiatly, there was a nice article about Tony in the Vail Daily today.  It sounds like he was a fantastic kid and will be sorely missed by many.  Incredibly sad.

 

Seibert remembered as great skier, friend, leader

http://www.vaildaily.com/news/9652298-113/tony-seibert-vail-family


Edited by tball - 1/8/14 at 10:11pm
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