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Review of my ski technique from 4 years ago until now: Feedback

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

I am the blue jacket.  Skip centennial video 2, it is irrelevant.

 

The intent here is tipping.

 

The intent here is to make GS turns through the bumps while staying counter balanced

 

Same as Osprey #1. Make make GS turns through the bumps while staying counter balanced

 

and (4 years ago)

 

 

Any feedback would be appreciated.  A few years ago the big feedback was to shorten transition as I had a static spot as you can see from the old video.  In the 2 bump runs today, I tried less traversing per say.  I also tried to ditch the hop turn that some pointed out as unnecessary.

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 21
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post #3 of 21

Townicus, I edited your post to embed the videos.  Looks like Colorado is skiing nicely.

 

Here is a link to your 2010 thread so users can see the progress: Improving my Technique

post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Townicus View Post
 

I am the blue jacket.  Skip centennial video 2, it is irrelevant.

 

The intent here is tipping.

 

 

Any feedback would be appreciated.  A few years ago the big feedback was to shorten transition as I had a static spot as you can see from the old video.  In the 2 bump runs today, I tried less traversing per say.  I also tried to ditch the hop turn that some pointed out as unnecessary.

 

Thanks!

You look tentative in the first video but I would be too if I had a guy yelling at me to tip.  He's not going to get many tips if he keeps yelling like that. :D

post #5 of 21

Video 1

Nice carving. What did he mean by shouting "slow down"? Skiing more out of the fall line or brushing? I taught the tipping looked great. Nice clean tracks. Not everybody that think they can can do that.

 

Video 2

Not really GS turns in my book but very nice skiing. Good flow and you adapted well to all bumps randomly bumping you around. I liked the "air" part.

 

Video 3

Could be the skis but I did not like that sideways slipping down the backside of some of the bumps (downhill side). Also, turning left you countered more than turning to your right. Your right hand turn looked much better to me. Turning left you kind of forced yourself into that countered position very mechanically and your arms were too straight and forwards. That's not smooth and relaxed or looked very functional.

 

Video 4

Not bad. I actually see not much difference between the first 3 and this last video. Looked like you had been coached a bit against your nature. I think I have seen that video before.

post #6 of 21
Looks like a good improvement and you are skiing well. Your CA and CB look weak generally. I see you extending up on the new foot and moving inside to start your tipping, sometimes at the start of the new turn you pick up the inside foot and step it in rather than rolling it onto edge.
What are the success criteria you and your coaches have set for you? Do your movements achieve them? What does? What does not?
post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
I have never been coached or taken lessons. However, the intent is to become the best skier I can in the most efficient manner.

The old video feedback was to remove the static park and ride. I was trying to achieve this in the first bump run. The second bump run was to focus on CA and CB going slow. My spine is fused from T2-L2 and my friend who filmed instructed me to exaggerate the counter moves which are really awkward to me possibly because of my spine?

Thanks so far!
post #8 of 21

It sure sounds like Paul is coaching you and that you've been effectively getting coaching from books and the Internet. You've gotten good value from what you've paid for your coaching so far. Now is a good time to ask yourself how you will measure both time and money when considering what is the most efficient learning.

 

With your fused spine, you've mentioned difficulty with upper/lower body separation. How far can you rotate your hips? Standing with my feet about shoulder width apart I can rotate my hips (angle of the belt buckle) about 75 degrees each way (90 degrees would be hips perpendicular to the feet, 0 would be no rotation). Lying on your back with one leg flat on the floor and one leg raised vertically, what is the range of rotation of your foot (really the femur, but you can see the foot)? I'm old and stiff. I can rotate my feet about 75 degrees total (45 to the outside and 30 to the inside).

 

I hesitate to offer specific feedback on this skiing because you've been following a specific methodology. The feedback I would give you is subject to your ability to move and would conflict with how you've been learning and would be too long for a post. Your skiing is fine. Could the performance level be raised? Everyone's performance level could be raised. Could in person coaching using any particular teaching methodology have done better or worse over 4 years? Sure. You don't need to put down the Kool Aid (tm) and slowly back away, but could you? The $64,000 question is why come to Epic when there is forum dedicated to the methodology you practice? If your current approach is working fine, I doubt we can help you here. If not, then the $32,000 questions are:

1) what do you want to change in your skiing?

2) are you ready to invest more time and money to improve your skiing performance?

post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

You look tentative in the first video but I would be too if I had a guy yelling at me to tip.  He's not going to get many tips if he keeps yelling like that. :D

 

Would you prefer e-mail?:)

post #10 of 21
I did not have the sound on, so not sure about the yelling, but it fits the clips. Do you have any video of yourself just having a blast, skiing in a way that puts a big stupid grin on your face? Personally I find that it helps to build on what I do well and/or enjoy doing, rather than trying to check off some box on a skills list. Example: "I love the feeling of arcing medium turns on firm snow, and would like to be able to move on to steeper terrain with them, tightening up the radius." Your skiing looks a little bit like you are doing it for someone else's benefit. I think you should try a few lessons with St. Francis and the birds.
post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
The Rusty-

I have never invested money. I really want to be careful what I say, but I read a pmts book because one of my clients asked me to. A good friend and ski buddy of mine is someone who practices pmts. However, I am not someone who ever adopts any specific brand, principle, or ideal that pertains to the small things in life such as recreation. I like to be objective and make my own path that makes sense.

My feeling is that there are some very hearty skiers on this forum who can, and some have shared great feedback pertaining to my average skiing. At the end of the day, I don't need to improve. I am just extremely passionate about the sport, and like everything in life, I want to be as excellent as I can within reason. But I am not investing any money into this. I ultimately enjoy the process of learning and sharing. So far, this forum has been quite enjoyable, informative, and a place I look forward to visiting.

Thanks again!
post #12 of 21

First question: Is there something wrong with your left arm? Seriously. In the 2nd Osprey clip it look way different fro the right.

 

So I like that your legs move nicely, when the timing is good you have a good ability to keep in contact with the terrain. In the tipping video, what I did not like is that if you look above the feet, it is very static, you have a left turn pose and a right turn pose and switch from one right to the other. That should be a flowing movement that never stops.

 

In the Osprey vids, I'd want to see more patience at the start of the turn. You get inside too fast, and you do it through inclination. You need more separation at the waist then you won't tip over like you do on that left footer at the start of Osprey 1.

 

Whatever you are doing in Osprey 2 isn't helping, is it?

 

edit: wanted to add that one of the key elements in the sport is to be standing on your outside ski. Inclinating makes that harder. It will also be easier to control that if you open your stance a bit. Yeah, your ski buddy will disagree with that, but it's the truth, you will be more effective with a bit more air between your legs.


Edited by epic - 1/7/14 at 6:47pm
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Townicus View Post

The Rusty-

I have never invested money. I really want to be careful what I say, but I read a pmts book because one of my clients asked me to. A good friend and ski buddy of mine is someone who practices pmts. However, I am not someone who ever adopts any specific brand, principle, or ideal that pertains to the small things in life such as recreation. I like to be objective and make my own path that makes sense.

My feeling is that there are some very hearty skiers on this forum who can, and some have shared great feedback pertaining to my average skiing. At the end of the day, I don't need to improve. I am just extremely passionate about the sport, and like everything in life, I want to be as excellent as I can within reason. But I am not investing any money into this. I ultimately enjoy the process of learning and sharing. So far, this forum has been quite enjoyable, informative, and a place I look forward to visiting.

Thanks again!

Thumbs Up I wholeheartedly share your attitude. The process of learning and sharing is almost as fun as skiing itself. By hanging on I sure have benefited much from some skiers here and elsewhere who are passionate about this brainy sport of ours.

post #14 of 21
Townie, I'm not going to comment too much on your skiing other than to say you still follow a good bit in your off piste work compared to your piste work... Watch your head... It looking exactly across the hill where you're pointing your skis.., look toward the apex of your next turn, or even more directly down the fall line, and see what happens.
Edited by markojp - 1/7/14 at 9:34pm
post #15 of 21

T2-L2! Impressive skiing Townicus.  I am not a ski instructor so my observations can be readily discarded, but hey its the internet.  Maybe you should get a a brace for your friend to wear that would lock him up from T2-L2, that is pretty massive, over half your spine is immobile and your managing bump fields.  So look where you do have mobility, the rusty already cued in on the hips, since you will have limited L spine mobility they will have to be able to do a lot of the work. The other spot as mark mentioned was your head, but not only the head, your shoulder blades.  If your head is rotated right feel what your blades do, play with squeezing one to the spine and the other away, feel what it does to the tension in your neck, better yet, stand on a pivot board and feel what the movement of the shoulder blades can do for rotating the lower body. You may not have spinal mobility but the muscles still work and influence both ends.  The more you can feel that relationship it will provide more dynamics to your skiing movement.  

post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Townicus View Post

The Rusty-

I have never invested money. I really want to be careful what I say, but I read a pmts book because one of my clients asked me to. A good friend and ski buddy of mine is someone who practices pmts. However, I am not someone who ever adopts any specific brand, principle, or ideal that pertains to the small things in life such as recreation. I like to be objective and make my own path that makes sense.

My feeling is that there are some very hearty skiers on this forum who can, and some have shared great feedback pertaining to my average skiing. At the end of the day, I don't need to improve. I am just extremely passionate about the sport, and like everything in life, I want to be as excellent as I can within reason. But I am not investing any money into this. I ultimately enjoy the process of learning and sharing. So far, this forum has been quite enjoyable, informative, and a place I look forward to visiting.

Thanks again!

Townie,

 

Because of community management issues that we will not discuss publicly, EpicSki has strict limitations on what can be discussed about that particular teaching system or your good friend.

 

There is an old saying that time is money. There is another old saying that you get what you pay for. I've said that you have received great value for what you have paid money for. I'm suggesting that you could get greater value from the time spent. With this skiing there are a lot of opportunities for comments and suggestions. How are you going to filter through all of the suggestions and come up with a plan?  How are you going to translate between the terminology you have already learned and the different terminology/semantics used by PSIA/the rest of the world? What are you going to do about suggestions that directly contradict what you have already learned? These problems can all be solved in time, but there is no guarantee that they will. As  a fitness trainer, you should know that there are times when getting a coach is the most effective solution.

 

I'm here to help, but my ability to help is limited by what you bring to the table. With that caveat my suggestion is for you to focus on developing more directional separation between the upper and lower body. Let the hips and shoulders face the inside of the new turn before the edge change.

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Townicus View Post

I have never been coached or taken lessons. However, the intent is to become the best skier I can in the most efficient manner.

The old video feedback was to remove the static park and ride. I was trying to achieve this in the first bump run. The second bump run was to focus on CA and CB going slow. My spine is fused from T2-L2 and my friend who filmed instructed me to exaggerate the counter moves which are really awkward to me possibly because of my spine?

Thanks so far!

 

   While I am sure that a fused spine is a disadvantage, I feel that you misunderstand what parts of the body it occurs in. It happens in the hip sockets and femurs not the spine. There is much to be said and debated about how but, I believe there is consensus about where it happens.

   Wether you are receiving paid on-site coaching or not, with your chosen path I believe it would be very helpful for you to be able to discuss your movement goal setting and your success or lack thereof and why . If you are not meeting your goal reel it back until you have success. Example, two of your videos evaluate a certain goal in tough terrain that you do not demonstrate on a very gentle pitch, Why would you expect it to be there when it gets tougher? I'd go back to the gentle terrain until you repeatedly and consistently model the chosen movement and then progress incrementally.

   I hope that doesn't sound like I am beating you up, your skiing is fine.

post #18 of 21
Thread Starter 

Here are a few videos of just having fun.  8 Inches on top of moguls.  I have committed to performing drills to correct CB/CA.  This seems to be a problem as I tend to incline (banking).  Usually it works for me because I ski much faster than these videos and speed covers up this problem.  But as I have slowed down to work on things, every now and again I will fall over mid turn to the inside.  It seems the CB is non-existent.

 

 

 

Thanks for all the continued feedback.  The skiing here in central Colorado has been going off!

post #19 of 21

Nice skiing!   One obvious suggestion: keep you hands up and out.  You are consistently dropping your hands.

 

See @MrSnowPlow's hand position in this fun video:

 

He originally posted this here: http://www.epicski.com/t/121144/new-technical-skiing-video-on-youtube

 

Hopefully Colorado looks like that again soon!  A week without snow reminds us of how spoiled we are :)

post #20 of 21
A focus on fundamentals seems to be reaping it's rewards. Nice job!
post #21 of 21

That's great development in 4 years. In your old clip, your skis take you for a ride down that bucking bronco; in the new clips, you're more often taking the skis for a ride!

 

I'd say two opportunities for development, which I believe should be valid across teaching systems: 

  • Become more mobile in your skiing. It's really visible in your tipping video - you lighten and tip the inside ski (good), and then remain in that position (bad). High end skiers don't ski into positions - you should be creating constant movement through those lower joints, and making adjustments in different directions (front-back, side-side, up-down, rotationally) to manage your balance and the pressure underfoot. Once you're moving those lower joints, it'll be easier for you to find your center again as well. 
  • Constantly turn. This is related to the point above. You should constantly be moving through a turn - no traversing, no hanging on to an old turn. If you're not constantly turning, every turn is going to be like your first turn of a run. This issue surfaces in your exercise videos the most, but it's also evident in the bump videos. 

 

But wowee, is that ever great development for 4 years. 

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