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Beginner Skis after a long time off

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 

Hello all.  First post here.

 

Great forum!  Glad I found it.

 

I just came back from a 4 day ski trip at Jay Peak, VT.  Had a fabulous time.  Prior to that I hadn't skied for probably nearly 20 years.  Wife, kids and career put a damper on my downhill adventures.  A lot has changed in that time.  Anyhow, I'm looking forward to getting back into it and hopefully bringing along the rest of the family. 

 

While there, I rented a pair of Elan Exar e-Rise 140 skiis and had them paired to Dalbello boots.

 

20 years ago, I owned a pair of early 90's Fischer skiis (185's, I think) and was a decent beginner/intermediate skier.  Probably closer to the beginner since I really didn't take any lessons.  I grew up playing hockey, so the transition (if you want to call it that) wasn't huge when I went to skiis.  I'm sure my technique wasn't the best, but I managed to enjoy myself. 

 

Those Elan's were my very first experience with parabolic skiis.  They were joyfull!  On the 3rd day of skiing I was very comfortable on all the green trails on that mountain.  Since I'm now 42, I thought it'd be wise to get some instruction.  I got 2 hours a day for 3 days.  My last two days were really good.  I wish I could have stayed a few more days...  I didn't venture out on to any blue trails, but had the itch the last day.  My instructor on the last day told me what I was doing on skiis was amazing (maybe he gets paid to say that) and the only thing holding me back was confidence.  Maybe he was right.  I was taking it slow and didn't really want to rush things.  After all, my wife and kids are all newbies.  Skiing with them on the green trails as a family is a goal of mine and would make me very happy.  We're not there yet.  That being said, I'd still have to break away every once and awhile to push it a bit.

 

I suppose that still makes me a beginner, but what type of ski should I be looking at?  What length?  Should I try a shorter ski for a year and then go up?  The choices seem to be never ending.  I'm not really interested in renting. 

 

1.Where in the world are you skiing?

 

All East Coast stuff for now, primarily Vermont.  Possibly Virginia and West Virginia

 

2.What kinds of terrain do you prefer (groomed runs, moguls, race course, park'n'pipe, trees, steeps, backcountry/sidecountry)

 

Groomed.

 

3.How many days a year do you ski?

 

Right now, not many.  Realistically, in the future, probably 14-21 days.

 

4.How advanced are you as a skier?

 

Not that advanced.  Hopefully, I answered that above.

 

5.What's your height and weight?

 

6'  205-210 lbs.

 

 

I have a few ski guesses.  Looking for some input...

 

1.  Fischer Motive 74 (T/W/T 120-74-104) (150, 155, 160, 165, 170, 175)

2.  Fischer Motive 76 (too advanced???)  (T/W/T  122-76-106) (Lengths 154,161,168,175)

3.  Volkl RTM 75 (too advanced???)  (T/W/T 120-75-105) (Lengths 153, 159, 166, 173)

 

Am I completely off base here????

 

Suggestions???

 

Thanks,

 

Jon

post #2 of 35

Welcome back to skiing! And to Epic.

 

Two bits of advice:

 

1) Don't go buy a pair of skis. Rent until March, take some of the money you would use on skis and invest in lessons. Then, when you've gotten to intermediate stage, and can approximate a parallel turn, which will be around the time the spring sales show up, you might try gear reviews here or at places like Real Skiers. Trust me, your needs and wants in a pair of skis will change dramatically by then.

 

            1a) Alternative: Buy a used/demo pair at a shop or online. Do not pay more than $100. Expect to sell them next September for $50. 

 

2) Do go buy a pair of boots. At a reputable slope side shop; our "Ask the Boot Guys" forum can give you names if you tell where. You will want a pair that feel pretty snug in the shop, not street show comfy, and probably a flex around 100-110 for a guy your size, but they can fill you in on details. The brand is irrelevant since it's all about how the boot fits your foot. Each brand has its own characteristic fit. Make sure you try on several brands. Trust me on this one too, a good pair of boots will help you improve a lot faster than a new pair of skis you'll be bored with in a season or two. 

 

Good luck! 

post #3 of 35
Go wider, 84-88mm waist.

Get Good boots first, they are the most important part.

Where do you live or plan to ski ? Find a great boot fitter in either place, I perfer the ski area town.

I have a great boot fitter if your in the Ludlow VT area. The Boot Pro is the shop. Shon the owner or ask for Geek. Both are some of the best in VT.

After you get a good boot, them demo skis.

I love my Volkl Kendo's. I'm about your size and have them in 177cm
post #4 of 35

I ski the Motive 76 and I don't think they would be too advanced for you. My experience with the Motives has been you really need to be on top of them to make them work for you.  You might want to try the Rossignol Experience 83 if you want a wider ski that is more forgiving.  If I were you I'd buy some good boots first then wait for the end of season sales to pick up skis.  You can find some nice sales at the beginning of March and still get some skiing in on your new stuff.

post #5 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

Welcome back to skiing! And to Epic.

 

Two bits of advice:

 

1) Don't go buy a pair of skis. Rent until March

 

Thanks for the reply!

 

If I rent, should I look for something specific?  Size, type, or just whatever they suggest?

post #6 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post

Go wider, 84-88mm waist.
 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by voghan View Post
 

try the Rossignol Experience 83 if you want a wider ski that is more forgiving

 

Thanks for the reply's guys!

 

What would a wider ski provide that the skinnier doesn't?  Is it a ski for room to grow?  I just figured because of my experience that a 75 ish width ski would be about right on groomed trails.  Sorry for the questions.  I'm trying to learn about this stuff as I go.

post #7 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post


I have a great boot fitter if your in the Ludlow VT area. The Boot Pro is the shop. Shon the owner or ask for Geek. Both are some of the best in VT.
 

 

Thanks for that!  I actually grew up in VT and now live in VA.  I still have family up there.  I'll keep that place in mind.  I doubt any of my local places are worth a hoot, but you never know...

post #8 of 35

I'm in the same boat as you, sort of. I skied the resorts as a kid on yearly trips with the family, loved it. Then I went into the Marines and skied every year on leave and 30 days each year during cold weather training in Bridgeport Calif. Then I went to college, had a family and somehow forgot how much I loved it.

We took a weekend trip to a small resort in Pa and I fell back in love with it. I took a beginners lesson, since it had been 20 years since I put the boots on. Two hours later I was flying down the green slopes and it all came back to me. I even ventured down one blue and had a blast. I took my kids along, their first time. They are now snowboard crazy.

I don't want to go out and buy new skis, I checked out ebay and found tons of used skis on the cheap. That seemed really iffy to me though.

I like the idea of getting good well fitting boots and then renting the skis. Seems like a sound approach.

 

Glad to be back....

post #9 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Originally Posted by HDGymRat View Post

 

 I took my kids along, their first time. They are now snowboard crazy.

 

 

Mine too!  After 3 days, 2 of my 3 kids were tearing up the bunny hill.  A blast to watch.  All of them got the toe side corners and stops, but are still working on the heal stuff.  They love it.  I wanted to take them on some green trails, but they just aren't ready.  Maybe next time...

 

Welcome back to skiing by the way.  Like you, I'd forgotten how much I liked it.

 

Will probably get the boots first and then go from there.  Lot's of choices for skis nowadays. 

post #10 of 35

Asking the store about skis, when you buy your boots may be a good opportunity; but be honest with your budget and likely these are just transition skis.

If you are still on the greens, the skis you want now aren't the ones you want later. 
You can see if there is a place that does season-leases, which is usually for beginner-intermediate level skis, or just paying out of pocket for rentals each time until you improve. 

 


I will say though having the same equipment is beneficial to learning, so you can get used to what the equipment will do and can work on your technique, rather then getting variables changed over and over again on you.   Places that do season-leases will let you come back in and swap to something else they have, will if you progress mid-season.  Typically this will still be a beginner-intermediate ski, but perhaps you can change lengths.

 

Even with beginner skis, you want to look for skis that are about chin height for beginner, and if possible has at least a little bit of rocker, and hopefully relatively new.  All the top end resorts have refreshed their rental fleets to have rocker even for ski school skis.


Once you get to at least the blues, then buying a pair of skis will make more sense.

post #11 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

 

Places that do season-leases will let you come back in and swap to something else they have, will if you progress mid-season.  Typically this will still be a beginner-intermediate ski, but perhaps you can change lengths.

 

 

Hadn't thought about this.  Any ski I should try to get or just what they have available?

 

Thanks!

post #12 of 35

if you do a season lease, you probably don't have too much of a choice.   
Beginner/Intermediate skis used for rental fleets all go by other names then what is usually reviewed or scrutinized by the general skiing public, so it's a different market.

 

You can just put your trust into the hands of the shop to advise you on the best ski they have available for you, or just try different things out, and chat them up on what you like and what you didn't like.

post #13 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtViking View Post
 

 

Thanks for that!  I actually grew up in VT and now live in VA.  I still have family up there.  I'll keep that place in mind.  I doubt any of my local places are worth a hoot, but you never know...

Welcome to EpicSki!  There are good boot fitters in DC and northern VA.  Sales will start right after Pres. Day in Feb. since the Mid-Atlantic season is usually over by late Feb.

 

Do you have any interest in short trips locally with the family?  If so, check out Bryce and Massanutten.  Both are good places to learn the fundamentals to get ready for ski trip to bigger mountains.  There will be a free demo tent at Massanutten Jan. 10-11.  My daughter loved ski school (ages 4-12).  Has not had a bad instructor.  The 90-min clinics for advanced beginners and intermediates are a very good deal.  Can get a package deal with lift ticket, rental, and clinic.  For more about Mnut:

 

http://www.epicski.com/a/massanutten-an-unofficial-guide

post #14 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

Welcome to EpicSki!  There are good boot fitters in DC and northern VA.  Sales will start right after Pres. Day in Feb. since the Mid-Atlantic season is usually over by late Feb.

 

Do you have any interest in short trips locally with the family?  If so, check out Bryce and Massanutten.  Both are good places to learn the fundamentals to get ready for ski trip to bigger mountains.  There will be a free demo tent at Massanutten Jan. 10-11.  My daughter loved ski school (ages 4-12).  Has not had a bad instructor.  The 90-min clinics for advanced beginners and intermediates are a very good deal.  Can get a package deal with lift ticket, rental, and clinic.  For more about Mnut:

 

http://www.epicski.com/a/massanutten-an-unofficial-guide


Thanks for the info!

 

Had planned on visiting Massanutten at some point.  My kids (7,8 &10) all need snowboard instruction.  Didn't realize about the demo tent this Friday and Saturday.  I don't think I'll be able to make it, but I'll try to shuffle some stuff around!

 

Any thoughts on Ski World in Va. Beach for boot fitting?

post #15 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtViking View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

Welcome to EpicSki!  There are good boot fitters in DC and northern VA.  Sales will start right after Pres. Day in Feb. since the Mid-Atlantic season is usually over by late Feb.

 

Do you have any interest in short trips locally with the family?  If so, check out Bryce and Massanutten.  Both are good places to learn the fundamentals to get ready for ski trip to bigger mountains.  There will be a free demo tent at Massanutten Jan. 10-11.  My daughter loved ski school (ages 4-12).  Has not had a bad instructor.  The 90-min clinics for advanced beginners and intermediates are a very good deal.  Can get a package deal with lift ticket, rental, and clinic.  For more about Mnut:

 

http://www.epicski.com/a/massanutten-an-unofficial-guide


Thanks for the info!

 

Had planned on visiting Massanutten at some point.  My kids (7,8 &10) all need snowboard instruction.  Didn't realize about the demo tent this Friday and Saturday.  I don't think I'll be able to make it, but I'll try to shuffle some stuff around!

 

Any thoughts on Ski World in Va. Beach for boot fitting?

Oops, I messed up.  The demo days are Jan. 11-12, Sat-Sun.

 

Mnut has a lot of snowboard instructors.  Geronimo is used as the snowboard learning area for adv. beginners since it has more pitch than the long green.  That has a quad with conveyor loading.  When Mnut expanded the training area and added a second magic carpet, they made sure that section was steep enough to get never-evers started on a snowboard.

 

My daughter did a never-ever full-day a few years ago.  Learned enough to know she was going to stick with skis.  Good thing since we go to Alta for spring break.

 

I have friends who live near you.  Let me ask where they went.  They got basic equipment at a store that was okay for beginners.  This is their second season ever and they are Special Value (Sun-Fri) pass holders at Mnut.  However, for true boot fitting I would suggest going to Freestyle of Charlottesville.  If you make it to Mnut for a demo day, you can talk to them about what services they provide for boot fitting.  If you make it to Mnut on Sun, Jan. 12, I'm pretty sure my friends will be around.

post #16 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post


1) Don'tThen, when you've gotten to intermediate stage, and can approximate a parallel turn

Those two don't go hand in hand, do they? I'm doing parallel turns now.
post #17 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtViking View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post


1) Don'tThen, when you've gotten to intermediate stage, and can approximate a parallel turn

Those two don't go hand in hand, do they? I'm doing parallel turns now.

Still not worth buying skis right now.  Ski some more and then take advantage of late season sales.  Those will start in late Feb in the Mid-A.  Online sales usually start some time in March.  For instance, could get skis used as demo skis for a season for a good price.

 

GIven that you were a hockey player and skied before when you were much younger, my guess is that you are well past the beginner stage.  Intermediate is a pretty broad category.  I skied for two seasons in middle school on straight skis.  Then didn't get back on skis for 10 years.  Even with straight skis, I didn't have any problems having fun the first day at a little mountain in NC.  Did ski much as a working adult.  First time on shaped skis in 2000 was really easy in comparison to straight skis.

post #18 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post
 

Asking the store about skis, when you buy your boots may be a good opportunity; but be honest with your budget and likely these are just transition skis.

If you are still on the greens, the skis you want now aren't the ones you want later. 

 

This is really good advice.  I bought my boots first and ended up in a pair of boots that now feel too big and are a flex of 50.  At the time I was only planning on skiing maybe four or five times a year but in reality I skied 28 times last season and already have nine days in this season.  That said, owning my own boots made a huge difference in my skiing so even though I'm going to probably replace then at the end of the season it was worth the $200 I spent on them.

post #19 of 35
Thread Starter 

Boot Update:

 

Walked into a local ski shop to look at some boots.  Talked to a gentleman for about 5 minutes or so prior to trying any on.  I wanted to make sure they actually fitted boots and were not a basic retailer.  I asked him twice and he confirmed both times that he was a bootfitter and had 30+ years experience doing it.  I read the "ask the boot guy" several times and felt I had at least a basic understanding of what to expect.

 

I tried on 5 pairs of boots and ended up buying a pair or 4 buckle Nordica boots (didn't like the 3 buckle).  I found 2 different pairs of Nordica that seemed to fit my foot right off the shelf.  All the other boots had something that didn't feel right, either the heel (lange) or the top of arch (dalberra).  So, I'm really happy with the fit of these boots.

 

The flex rating of the boots I purchased is 80.  Hope I didn't make a mistake...  After re-reading "ask the boot guy" forum again, their basic guidance is to buy a boot with a higher flex rating because it can be reduced easier than going the other way.  The other pair of Nordica's that felt good had a flex rating of 110.    

 

The fitter said the rating was more important with traditional skis rather than with beginner/advanced shaped skis.  Not sure if that's true or not, but his explanation sounded reasonable.

 

 

 

Ski Update:

 

I asked the boot guy about skis.  I told him I wasn't in a position to buy anything but I wanted his opinion on which skis would be good for me.

 

He immediately steered me towards the Head Rev 75's.  He also had Volkl's, Elan's, Rossi's, K2's and a few others.  He said he had some other great skis but felt those Rev 75's would suit me.  Opinions???? 

 

Not going to buy anything... just looking for some feedback.

post #20 of 35

You're a big guy (6'  205-210 lbs) and you got boots with an 80 flex, which is all the way at the soft end of the spectrum for light (125 lbs) skiers.  You'll crush these things when you start moving faster.

I'm going to be blunt here.  See if others agree with me.  You'll outgrow them fast skiing 14-20 days per year, and boots cost a LOT to replace.

Consider taking them back.  You may need a beefier, stiffer boot.

 

You could post a description of the boot you got and your profile on "Ask the Boot Guys" and get only bootfitters responding.  They are good.

http://www.epicski.com/f/73/ask-the-boot-guys


Edited by LiquidFeet - 1/8/14 at 8:16am
post #21 of 35
Not a boot expert, but my experience is that boot flex index is not consistent between brands. I also agree that most skiers don't need or benefit from a stiff boot. Tipping your skis on edge to initiate turns is more important for a recreational skier than trigger-like responsiveness to forward pressure.

Even if the boots you've chosen are the right boots for you, plan to make a few follow up visits to your boot fitter as things shift and you notice any issues (discomfort, hot spots, loose areas; etc).

The Rev series overall are great skis (I have two pair, the Rev 85 and Rev 105). I haven't skied the Rev 75 but I've seen lot of them as rentals, so it would appear to be an appropriate ski for a developing skier.

Keep in mind that most of the skis that are typically rental models are made by one or two manufacturers, primarily Élan. I'm not sure if this is true of the Rev 75. Regardless, I don't know that you'll find much difference in performance between rental fleet skis.

Now once you try demo skis (higher end models) you will notice lots of differences in materials, shape, flex and side cut even within models with the same type of skier/skiing in mind. For now, work on the skills from lessons. Once you are progressing from basic open parallel turns to dynamic parallel, then you will be better able to feel the differences between skis when you try some demos.

Smile and have fun!
post #22 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtViking View Post

 

The flex rating of the boots I purchased is 80.  Hope I didn't make a mistake...  You did. My 11 year old, who weighs 74 lbs, skis in 80 flex boots. Return them for the 110's you liked. And his explanation is b.s.; he fit you in 80 flex because they'd feel more comfy in the store.

 

 

He immediately steered me towards the Head Rev 75's.  He also had Volkl's, Elan's, Rossi's, K2's and a few others.  He said he had some other great skis but felt those Rev 75's would suit me.  Opinions???? 

 

You'll outgrow these in a season. Start with something you can learn to carve on - meaning that a narrower ski allows you to get from edge to edge quicker, and exert more pressure with less work - but that you can also enjoy in softer light crud such as you'll get up in VT - meaning not quite as narrow for your weight as a 75 mm. 

 

There are some good suggestions already to demo; Rossignol Experience 83's would work well, as would any number of skis in the 78-83 range. Some of this is about feel, which is why several of us have recommended demoing. It's more of a spectrum, but for a gross generalization, some brands have a quieter, damper feel as they do their work. Head, K2, Rossignol, Stockli, Kastle come to mind. Some brands fall more toward the middle IMO, say Dynastar, Elan, Volkl, and Salomon. Other brands have a livelier feel with more snowfeel and pop. Fischer, Blizzard, and Atomic come to mind. And within those brands, some models are better suited to a guy your size, setting aside issues of skill level. 

 

So what one of us recommend to you may not be what you find you like. Head REV's are solid skis, and would work well for a bigger guy like you. Far as I know, they are all made by Head. If you want to keep them a while, and plan to hit Jay etc, the REV 80's would make more sense. Elan makes some very nice skis in this range, the Ambibio 82 XTi would be a strong choice. The Dynastar Outland 80 would also fit the bill well. On the livelier side, the Salomon Enduro 800 XT would be a good choice to check out, as would the Volkl RTM 81 or the K2 Rictor 82 XTI.

 

Eventually, this ski could become your frontside daily driver, and you could add a much wider ski specifically for powder and eastern trees. 


Edited by beyond - 1/8/14 at 8:49am
post #23 of 35

So having decided I wanted to get a pair of boots I made an appointment at a ski shop that had a boot fitter. It was an hour and a half drive, but it was through western Pa hill country, so it was nice scenery anyway.

 

After a little chat with the owner we started looking at boots. I learned things about boots I didn't know. Silly me, thought they were all about the same. For the past few weeks I've been renting and obviously grabbing boots that were 2 sizes to big. No wonder my feet and legs hurt after a few hours. And I found out that I have wide feet, who knew....

 

Started out with a pair of Lange boots, killed my feet. Then tried another type of Lange and the right foot felt good, but the left hurt like the dickens. Rossignol wasn't much better. I must have gone through 8 pair, the owner was a saint with the patience largely not seen these days.

 

Finally he pulled out a pair of Salomon XPro 100. Wow, fit nicely, no pain or discomfort. We talked about where my toe was in relation to the front of the boot, he put the boots in the "oven" and put spacers on my toe. Then maybe 15 or 20 minutes later I was sinking my feet into hot boots. After all was said and done I pulled of the spacers and put my feet back in the newly molded boots. To say they fit better than the rentals would be a massive understatement.

 

Can't wait till Sunday, heading to seven springs (closest place) to test them out.

 

Thanks for the advise guys.

 

Little edit here, I should give props to the place I went. Peak Ski and Snowboard in Gibsonia Pa. Good folks.

post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtViking View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

Welcome to EpicSki!  There are good boot fitters in DC and northern VA.  Sales will start right after Pres. Day in Feb. since the Mid-Atlantic season is usually over by late Feb.

 

Do you have any interest in short trips locally with the family?  If so, check out Bryce and Massanutten.  Both are good places to learn the fundamentals to get ready for ski trip to bigger mountains.  There will be a free demo tent at Massanutten Jan. 10-11.  My daughter loved ski school (ages 4-12).  Has not had a bad instructor.  The 90-min clinics for advanced beginners and intermediates are a very good deal.  Can get a package deal with lift ticket, rental, and clinic.  For more about Mnut:

 

http://www.epicski.com/a/massanutten-an-unofficial-guide


Thanks for the info!

 

Had planned on visiting Massanutten at some point.  My kids (7,8 &10) all need snowboard instruction.  Didn't realize about the demo tent this Friday and Saturday.  I don't think I'll be able to make it, but I'll try to shuffle some stuff around!

 

Any thoughts on Ski World in Va. Beach for boot fitting?

Oops, I messed up.  The demo days are Jan. 11-12, Sat-Sun.

 

Mnut has a lot of snowboard instructors.  Geronimo is used as the snowboard learning area for adv. beginners since it has more pitch than the long green.  That has a quad with conveyor loading.  When Mnut expanded the training area and added a second magic carpet, they made sure that section was steep enough to get never-evers started on a snowboard.

 

My daughter did a never-ever full-day a few years ago.  Learned enough to know she was going to stick with skis.  Good thing since we go to Alta for spring break.

 

I have friends who live near you.  Let me ask where they went.  They got basic equipment at a store that was okay for beginners.  This is their second season ever and they are Special Value (Sun-Fri) pass holders at Mnut.  However, for true boot fitting I would suggest going to Freestyle of Charlottesville.  If you make it to Mnut for a demo day, you can talk to them about what services they provide for boot fitting.  If you make it to Mnut on Sun, Jan. 12, I'm pretty sure my friends will be around.

Here is the list of mens/unisex skis that Freestyle plans to bring to the Massanutten Demo Days Jan. 11-12.

 

Blizzard Bonafide &b Brahma

Volkl RTM 81, RTM 84, Kendo

Rossignol Experience 83, Experience 88, Soul 7

Head Rev 80 Pro, Rev 85 Pro, Supershape Magnum

Scott Reverse, Crusade, The Ski

K2 Rictor 90 XTI, Amp 80 XTI

 

Hopefully the rain will hold off until late afternoon on Sat.  Sun should be a decent day.  There is plenty of base after the last few weeks of cold snowmaking weather, so temps in the low 50's won't be a problem.

 

By the way, on Jan. 12 there will be a special Intermediate Clinic 1:00-3:00 for $30.  Will be a Level 2 or 3 instructor.

post #25 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

Here is the list of mens/unisex skis that Freestyle plans to bring to the Massanutten Demo Days Jan. 11-12.

 

Blizzard Bonafide &b Brahma

Volkl RTM 81, RTM 84, Kendo

Rossignol Experience 83, Experience 88, Soul 7

Head Rev 80 Pro, Rev 85 Pro, Supershape Magnum

Scott Reverse, Crusade, The Ski

K2 Rictor 90 XTI, Amp 80 XTI

 

Hopefully the rain will hold off until late afternoon on Sat.  Sun should be a decent day.  There is plenty of base after the last few weeks of cold snowmaking weather, so temps in the low 50's won't be a problem.

 

By the way, on Jan. 12 there will be a special Intermediate Clinic 1:00-3:00 for $30.  Will be a Level 2 or 3 instructor.

 

Right on!

 

Thanks for the info.  Really appreciate you listing the ski's they're bringing.  That helps tremendously.  I've already picked out 4 or 5 I want to try.

 

Hope I can make it Sunday.  Saturday is pretty much out for me.

 

BTW, what is a level 2 or 3 instructor?

post #26 of 35

Instructors are often "certified" by a professional organization, PSIA, Professional Ski Instructors of America.  This is a personal choice; they don't have to do this to get hired as instructors.  Many instructors are not members of PSIA, and are not certified.  They may be fine instructors even without this certification.  It costs money to go through the process of certification, and ski instruction does not bring in much pay.

 

There are three levels of certification, Level I, II, and III.  Instructors need to pay to take instructional clinics and to take exams to achieve those certifications.  Their skiing skills and teaching skills are tested.  Each level is more difficult to pass.  A level III instructor should be a more experienced and nuanced teacher than any of the others.  

post #27 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtViking View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

Here is the list of mens/unisex skis that Freestyle plans to bring to the Massanutten Demo Days Jan. 11-12.

 

Blizzard Bonafide &b Brahma

Volkl RTM 81, RTM 84, Kendo

Rossignol Experience 83, Experience 88, Soul 7

Head Rev 80 Pro, Rev 85 Pro, Supershape Magnum

Scott Reverse, Crusade, The Ski

K2 Rictor 90 XTI, Amp 80 XTI

 

Hopefully the rain will hold off until late afternoon on Sat.  Sun should be a decent day.  There is plenty of base after the last few weeks of cold snowmaking weather, so temps in the low 50's won't be a problem.

 

By the way, on Jan. 12 there will be a special Intermediate Clinic 1:00-3:00 for $30.  Will be a Level 2 or 3 instructor.

 

Right on!

 

Thanks for the info.  Really appreciate you listing the ski's they're bringing.  That helps tremendously.  I've already picked out 4 or 5 I want to try.

 

Hope I can make it Sunday.  Saturday is pretty much out for me.

 

BTW, what is a level 2 or 3 instructor?

Sunday is probably the better day weather-wise any way.  My white Smith helmet has a brim and stickers for EpicSki, Alta, Big Sky, and a red &white one for SkiSoutheast.

 

I'm not an instructor, but have learned a fair amount from EpicSki threads in recent years.  My impression is that a Level 2+ instructor tends to have more experience and knowledge relevant to teaching intermediates and advanced skiers.  A Level 1 instructor who is working on passing Level 2 exams can also be a very good instructor for an intermediate.  That said, there are good instructors with 5+ years experience who don't get PSIA certification for assorted reasons.  As an aside, all instructors must be certified in Canada.

 

As an adult intermediate who learned as a kid, I had no idea how helpful working with an instructor could be until I did a multi-day clinic with Level 3 instructors.  The Mnut Silver Clinic is mostly taught by a Level 3 instructor.  Even with limited terrain options because Mnut is a small hill, I learned a lot last season that made a clear difference for my trips to Big Sky and Alta.

post #28 of 35
Thread Starter 

LiquidFeet, Beyond, and DesiredUsername,

 

Thanks for the boot flex thoughts! 

 

I traded the 80 flex in yesterday for the 110!  Hopefully, they'll serve me well for years to come.  The boot guy even conceded that those boots should last me awhile.

 

I also dropped down a 1/2 size to 27.0.  Apparently the 27.5 and 27's share the same shell.  By dropping to the 27, the footbed is raised giving a tighter fit.  The difference between the 27 and 27.5 was noticeable.  With the smaller boot I have more pressure on my toes at the front and definitely a snug fit around my entire foot.  They're not terribly comfortable, but my hope is that they'll break in with use and alleviate some if not all of the pressure points.  When I flex my knee over my toe, the toe pressure releases and gives me a small amount of wiggle room.  I checked the boot with the liner out.  It looks as though I've got at least 1 finger clearance in the back, but definitely not two.  The last seems to be good.  My foot measures 102mm and the boot last is 104mm.  I do have some pressure on my small toe side that causes a bit of numbness.  I put the boots on again today for a couple hours to see if it continues. 

post #29 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDGymRat View Post
 

So having decided I wanted to get a pair of boots I made an appointment at a ski shop that had a boot fitter.

 

 

 

 

Sounds like your experience was a tad better than mine!

 

Hope those new kicks work out well for you.

 

Thanks for sharing.

post #30 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtViking View Post
 

LiquidFeet, Beyond, and DesiredUsername,

 

Thanks for the boot flex thoughts! 

 

I traded the 80 flex in yesterday for the 110!  Hopefully, they'll serve me well for years to come.  The boot guy even conceded that those boots should last me awhile.

 

I also dropped down a 1/2 size to 27.0.  Apparently the 27.5 and 27's share the same shell.  By dropping to the 27, the footbed is raised giving a tighter fit.  The difference between the 27 and 27.5 was noticeable.  With the smaller boot I have more pressure on my toes at the front and definitely a snug fit around my entire foot.  They're not terribly comfortable, but my hope is that they'll break in with use and alleviate some if not all of the pressure points.  When I flex my knee over my toe, the toe pressure releases and gives me a small amount of wiggle room.  I checked the boot with the liner out.  It looks as though I've got at least 1 finger clearance in the back, but definitely not two.  The last seems to be good.  My foot measures 102mm and the boot last is 104mm.  I do have some pressure on my small toe side that causes a bit of numbness.  I put the boots on again today for a couple hours to see if it continues. 

Good move!  You will eventually want to get an aftermarket footbed for that boot.  The footbed will support your foot and increase sensitivity and performance more than you can imagine.  These footbeds come in a variety of quality and price.  You can get them for about $50 Sole up to over $300 Conformable.  Any of these will be 100x better than the stock footbed that came with your boot.  I use Sole footbeds in my street shoes and Conformable footbeds in my ski boots.  I use DPS footbeds in my snowboard boots, they are also good and cost about $150.  Footbeds don't wear out and can be easily transferred from boot to boot.

 

A well made footbed will dial in that fit between 1/2 sizes.

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