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Is Jay Peak big enough for a weeklong ski vacation? - Page 3

post #61 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

jen do you not like the sensation of skiing? or is it a chore? do you only like groomed flat terrain? if so why do you only like groomed flat terrain? do you like finding better snow?

 

 I can ski the same mountain for years with literally 1000s of runs a year over literally 100s of days and not get bored like ever get bored. but you ski a new mountain for 3-4 days and are bored? I am just saying that maybe its time to find what you actually like about skiing and getting even better at it and start skiing the mountain like your kids would ski the mountain and I promise borderm even on the smallest hill will go away.

 

Initially I asked on the thread if Jay was too long for a week of skiing for someone who likes to ski on the trails. And the answer I received from this board was a pretty resounding yes, it is too long if I am not going to ski the woods.  So then I asked where can I go for a week or so in the east and ski the trails and the answers were:  1.  Sugarloaf, 2. Lake Placid and do other stuff in the area, 3.  Bretton Woods and ski the woods, and 4. stay in a good location and visit different mountains.  These were the suggestions from the people on this board.  There wasn't a suggestion for a single resort where someone could ski just blue/black trails for a solid week, and most people advocated visiting different mountains.  My post above was to explain one reason why we like to stick with a particular place during our longer ski trips.

 

Just to respond to the questions--Usually our schedule is: put the kids in ski school, have a cup of coffee and eat some oatmeal, ski, take a break, ski more especially through lunchtime hours, take a break and eat some lunch, get a couple of runs in before ski school is over, pick up the kids and ski with them, have hot chocolate and a snack when the lifts close and then go home. On longer ski trips we usually wind up at Killington/Pico or Stowe, along with half of NYC.  These are great, challenging mountains but in terms of the blues and single blacks on the trail map, none of them take very long and even if you do a trail over and over (which we do), by the end of day 4 we are looking for a change.  Every year I take a couple of lessons and I am always trying to improve my technique, but I am realistically never going to be an expert skier at this point and I do not want to risk injury in places beyond my ability. 

 

The people on this board are mostly expert skiers and obviously having a different experience than I do. However, I really do enjoy it even with my more limited participation.

 

Also--I know people are tagging things on this thread.  Can someone tag the reference to Plattekill?  I had never heard of it before and was excited to learn about it.


Edited by jenfromNYC - 1/10/14 at 7:31am
post #62 of 71

Jen, lots of people only ski the groomers and have great ski trips.  I ski with lots of friends some of which ski all day on the hardest stuff and others who take a lot of breaks and ski the easy stuff.  All are fun trips.

 

I think there are actually lots of eastern ski areas that you’d enjoy for the week.  I think you missed one of the more obvious ones in Sugarbush, VT.  It’s similar to Stowe in a lot of ways but something new for you to try.  Gore is another great choice.  Nothing wrong with going back to Stowe or Killington either.  Sunday River and Sugarloaf in ME would work great too but the drive is longer.  Smuggler’s Notch is a little smaller but might be worth a look too.

 

It’s not clear to me if you plan to stay at lodging on mountain or in a nearby town.  If it’s a nearby town, it’s very easy to ski a 2nd place that’s about the same distance away.  You could always ski the 2nd place only if you got board of the 1st. 

post #63 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenfromNYC View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 

jen do you not like the sensation of skiing? or is it a chore? do you only like groomed flat terrain? if so why do you only like groomed flat terrain? do you like finding better snow?

 

 I can ski the same mountain for years with literally 1000s of runs a year over literally 100s of days and not get bored like ever get bored. but you ski a new mountain for 3-4 days and are bored? I am just saying that maybe its time to find what you actually like about skiing and getting even better at it and start skiing the mountain like your kids would ski the mountain and I promise borderm even on the smallest hill will go away.

 

Initially I asked on the thread if Jay was too long for a week of skiing for someone who likes to ski on the trails. And the answer I received from this board was a pretty resounding yes, it is too long if I am not going to ski the woods.  So then I asked where can I go for a week or so in the east and ski the trails and the answers were:  1.  Sugarloaf, 2. Lake Placid and do other stuff in the area, 3.  Bretton Woods and ski the woods, and 4. stay in a good location and visit different mountains.  These were the suggestions from the people on this board.  There wasn't a suggestion for a single resort where someone could ski just blue/black trails for a solid week, and most people advocated visiting different mountains.  My post above was to explain one reason why we like to stick with a particular place during our longer ski trips.

 

Just to respond to the questions--Usually our schedule is: put the kids in ski school, have a cup of coffee and eat some oatmeal, ski, take a break, ski more especially through lunchtime hours, take a break and eat some lunch, get a couple of runs in before ski school is over, pick up the kids and ski with them, have hot chocolate and a snack when the lifts close and then go home. On longer ski trips we usually wind up at Killington/Pico or Stowe, along with half of NYC.  These are great, challenging mountains but in terms of the blues and single blacks on the trail map, none of them take very long and even if you do a trail over and over (which we do), by the end of day 4 we are looking for a change.  Every year I take a couple of lessons and I am always trying to improve my technique, but I am realistically never going to be an expert skier at this point and I do not want to risk injury in places beyond my ability. 

 

The people on this board are mostly expert skiers and obviously having a different experience than I do. However, I really do enjoy it even with my more limited participation.

 

Also--I know people are tagging things on this thread.  Can someone tag the reference to Plattekill?  I had never heard of it before and was excited to learn about it.

Actually, with tens of thousands of users, I don't think most people reading EpicSki are experts.  However, those who answer questions do tend to be advanced/experts and/or instructors.  If you had asked your questions in Family Skiing or with a different title, the responses might have been a bit different.

 

You can always click on Resorts in the menu bar to look at the EpicSki Resort Page for any ski area.  Note that Plattekill is not open 7 days a week.

 

I think your family would like the skiing at Gore.  The place to stay would be Lake George for at least part of the week even if you stayed closer to the mountain for a few days.  About a 30 minute drive.  Or stay in Lake Placid and do a day trip mid-week.  About 1.5 hour drive.

post #64 of 71
Thread Starter 

Thanks again.  I have been to Gore and to all of the VT and Maine resorts mentioned.  Not the ones in NH though.  We tend to wind up at Stowe and Killiington because it is easier somehow, but we could definitely use a change.

post #65 of 71

jen it is clear to me that with the mind set you "you will never be an expert, or ever be able to ski more challenging terrain"  you wont. IMO no one of any age should ever think that will never be an expert.

 

"Whether you think you can or think you can not you are 100 percent absolutely right"

post #66 of 71

Hello Jen,

 

 

 

 

Quote:
 I really appreciate all of the advice offered on this board. I would just like to offer one more perspective.  I think many very good/expert skiers like to teach and ski with their children.  However, my family has always been a ski school family.  When they were little it was because we didn't feel confident teaching them and because we just wanted to get away from them for a little while. Now that they're older. when we go to the bigger mountains for a longer trip, we still put all of them--even the older ones--in ski school so they can continue to be challenged and improve their skills AND we want to get away from them for a little while.  So if you're the type of family that likes to banish their kids to ski school, dealing with the logistics of different ski mountains and registrations every day can be quite daunting plus the kids wouldn't get as much out of it.  I realize that this probably isn't the mindset of most of the people on this board, especially since it sounds like you guys teach the ski school.  But I wanted to point this out because it is one reason that some people look to find a single place for four or five days.

 

 

We are also a ski school family. The older kid, a solid intermediate at 7, can sometimes ski with us, but I also feel that they'd learn more at ski school, we'd get to ski more and faster, so everyone will have more fun. Agree that jumping between mountains in a ski school situation isn't great. Our morning schedule is a bit different though - get the kids out of the door the minute the ski school opens for the day, and head to the lifts immediately. I've been very sad over the fact that lifts often start running before the ski school opens. 

 

 

Quote:

Initially I asked on the thread if Jay was too long for a week of skiing for someone who likes to ski on the trails. And the answer I received from this board was a pretty resounding yes, it is too long if I am not going to ski the woods.  So then I asked where can I go for a week or so in the east and ski the trails and the answers were:  1.  Sugarloaf, 2. Lake Placid and do other stuff in the area, 3.  Bretton Woods and ski the woods, and 4. stay in a good location and visit different mountains.  These were the suggestions from the people on this board.  There wasn't a suggestion for a single resort where someone could ski just blue/black trails for a solid week, and most people advocated visiting different mountains.  My post above was to explain one reason why we like to stick with a particular place during our longer ski trips.

 

Just to respond to the questions--Usually our schedule is: put the kids in ski school, have a cup of coffee and eat some oatmeal, ski, take a break, ski more especially through lunchtime hours, take a break and eat some lunch, get a couple of runs in before ski school is over, pick up the kids and ski with them, have hot chocolate and a snack when the lifts close and then go home. On longer ski trips we usually wind up at Killington/Pico or Stowe, along with half of NYC.  These are great, challenging mountains but in terms of the blues and single blacks on the trail map, none of them take very long and even if you do a trail over and over (which we do), by the end of day 4 we are looking for a change.  Every year I take a couple of lessons and I am always trying to improve my technique, but I am realistically never going to be an expert skier at this point and I do not want to risk injury in places beyond my ability. 

We are not experts either - but I think, like the others pointed out, it all depends on mindset and attitude. I'm probably a slightly better skier than you are - I used to stick to groomers until a few years ago, now I do venture into bumps and woods when the conditions allow. I'm really enjoying the new terrain even though I'm not good at those bumps and woods, and can't ski those huge icy bumps on a steep slope.

 

But I definitely have a different attitude - I really, really want to become a better skier and to be able to ski everything with good technique and confidence. Will probably never be an expert (only ski 20 days a year at most) but I am getting better every year. I usually can't get enough skiing days - always sad to leave after a ski vacation - the only time when I get really discouraged is very poor weather.

 

Rather than (or in addition to) taking alesson or two, maybe pick a good book on skiing? What really helped me was "Breakthrough on the new skis" by Lito Tejada-Flores (certainly instructors here will recommend a lot more good books). I think you'll find a useful hint or a drill in a book - either ideas on how to approach bumps or something more basic, like checking that your stance is good and that you are using poles correctly. One you get into this, you'll probably find yourself skiing the same trail again, and again, and again, trying to go thru all its parts correctly.... (I remember I was stuck on a shorter "mellow black" for 3 days in a row on a big mountain, practicing a particular bit and never even looking at the scenery. Could have been on a much smaller mountain - for less money and closer to home  :))  No more boredom.

 

When you ski with your kids, do you follow them into the trails they did at ski school? When my 5-yr old said they did bumps and woods and wanted to take me there, I was all like, "If she can do it, so can I!" They would actually probably lead you into some kind of mellow trails that won't be too scary.

 

Something no-one mentioned -- do you own your gear or do you rent? I was pretty humble for quite a while, I thought I didn't need my own skis when I was "only" an intermediate and didn't ski too much. BUT once you get decent gear, comfort, technique, enjoyment and fun all go up tremendously.

post #67 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

Anybody posting here that has actually skied Jay this season?  The cold and wind isn't much of a controllable variable, but perhaps they've updated their grooming capabilities this season?  Perhaps not, but would be worth double checking before losing a deposit on whatever has been booked.

Sorry for the delayed response. I haven't been on in a while. I am actually a passholder at both Jay and Bretton Woods. I think I can offer some insight here.

 

Jay is definitely good for a week long trip if you get into the trees. If you're stuck on the groomers then forget it. The water park buys you one day of entertainment if you don't waste the novelty at night. Jay's snowmaking is mediocre and the groomers get quickly blown off, skied off, and iced up.

 

Bretton Woods is a very different mountain. There is very little wind, it is much warmer, and the terrain has little pitch. It is one of the best places in New England for casual cruisers. The ungroomed trails are also entertaining. They have lots and lots of glades of all skill levels. You can spend multiple days and still be discovering new routes in the glades. Their snowmaking is also one the best in New Hampshire along with Sunapee, Loon, and Cranmore. The crowds at Bretton Woods can be overwhelming on weekends and are new this season because they started giving free season passes to all the kids with season ski lease programs at shops throughout New England. If you're got the cash, staying at the Mt Washington Hotel is an experience.

 

My recommendation for you: take a week long trip to the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Compared to Vermont the crowds are much smaller, prices are much lower, and the mountain have very different vibes. The views in NH are much more dramatic as the Presidential range dwarfs anything in VT. Whereas much of VT looks like condos have been puked onto the mountain, the NH skis areas are more natural and largely lack slopeside lodging. People tend to stay in centralized towns like Lincoln and North Conway and drive to the mountains. A week in NH will be eye opening compared to Vermont.

 

Some tips:

- On the weekends stick to the quieter mountains like Black and Wildcat which rarely see lines. Wildcat only gets crowded on weekends after big dumps. Cannon gets busy on Saturdays but never on Sunday. If you're up for a little side trip, Ragged never ever gets busy.

- Split your hotel stays between Lincoln / Woodstock and North Conway. Lincoln allows easy access to Loon, Waterville Valley, and Cannon. North Conway is an easy drive to Attitash, Cranmore, Black, and Wildcat. Bretton Woods is accessible from either.

- If the natural snow / powder is good, go to Wildcat, Black, Cannon, or Bretton Woods. For snowmaking coverage go to Cranmore, Loon, or Bretton Woods.

- During Nor'easters the North Conway side (Cranmore, Attitash, Wildcat) gets more snow. During lighter clipper type systems, Bretton Woods and Cannon do better.

- Cannon and Wildcat are very wind prone. Loon, Waterville, Cranmore, and Attitash are middle of the road on wind. Bretton Woods and Black are the least wind prone.

post #68 of 71
I am in the minority here, but I am also mostly a groomers girl (although I do venture out into the trees every once in a while) and I do like Jay Peak a lot. I don't think their regular runs are all that bad; in fact, I quite enjoy them. Many are a lot of fun, although they do get icy sometimes, depending on the conditions. Their spa is also really nice wink.gif.

Having said that I would not choose to spend a full week at Jay Peak, or at any other East Coast resort either, for that matter... 3 days would be the max for me...
post #69 of 71
Nice article on Lake Placid activities in today's Times.

http://nyti.ms/1aHeBXj
post #70 of 71

Hi, I'm from Canada and I have skied Tremblant numerous times and it's very cold and icy and pact with people on the weekend. I love Jay Peak, I could easily spend a week there no problem and not get bored. Having said that my kids who are 10 and 13 love Bretton Woods. It is there favorite mountain. I will vouch for the awesome grooming and scenery. It is a groomers paradise. I would be able to spend a week there and not get bored. Also like everyone else the White Mountains have a lot to offer, Bretton Woods, Cannon, Attitash, Loon, Wild Cat, ( The lift ticket between Attitash and Wild Cat is interchangeable) Waterville Valley. You could base yourself out of North Conway for tax free outlet shopping at Settler's Green. We stayed at the Comfort inn last March, it was a great inexpensive hotel. All hills are with in 1hr drive of North Conway. Wild Cat is really spectacular, not a groomers paradise but it has the most beautiful scenery I have ever seen from a ski hill.

 

All that being said if I had to spend 1 week at 1 mountain in the east hands down it would be Sunday River Maine. The grooming is spectacular, equal to Bretton Woods, 8 peaks and 135 trails 6 terrain parks for your kids over 2300 verticle feet, night skiing is available, zip lining, ice skating, snowmobiling, outdoor heated pool you could swim in during the winter. My kids can't comment because they have not skied there yet. We alternate 1 year ski vacation, next year visit my parents in Florida, but our intention is to visit next year. I have had the chance to ski there however and I would say it is like a bigger and better Bretton Woods. It's also a little over an hour from North Conway so you could still get in some tax free outlet shopping. This place is a groomers paradise and you will be able to entertain yourself for a week I think.

 

Good Luck in your choice and happy skiing.

post #71 of 71

I think I could spend a week at Jay without being bored, but then again, I could spend two weeks skiing a little 250' vertical hill and not get bored; it's the skiing that's interesting.   There is always room for improvement, and the search for perfection in all areas of skiing is a mission for me.  Maybe it's just me; I can also recall spending hours doing nothing but continuous side-kicks on the heavy bag lot's of Saturday afternoons, or doing dozens of the same old kata I first learned as a white belt (newbie to Karatedo).  If you think you know skiing, you don't, there is always more to explore, even without impressive exciting terrain.

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